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Going on Vacation With (and Without) Your Geckos

gecko travel cage

As much as we love our home and our pets, sometimes we just need to get away.  Whether you own a single gecko or have a large, multi-species collection, plans must be in place for care and feeding of your pets while you’re gone.

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When considering care for geckos, the most important thing to remember is that reptiles are not mammals.  They don’t require the same amount of calories and  frequency of intake that mammals need because reptiles don’t burn calories to maintain a specific body temperature.  Adult reptiles are rarely fed every day and can survive for longer without food than their mammalian counterparts.  There are 3 aspects of care to consider for all geckos:  food, hydration and habitat management.  Many older juveniles and adult geckos can go without food for 10 days to 2 weeks, though this is not ideal under normal circumstances.  All geckos require more consistent hydration.  Geckos that have humidity, temperature and lighting needs that differ significantly from the “outside” environment will easily become stressed if these conditions are not maintained.  Babies and hatchlings are more delicate and require more frequent and precise feeding, hydration and habitat management.

Taking Your Gecko With You

Some people choose to bring their geckos with them when they go away.  This is not recommended for geckos that can’t be handled, those who are very sensitive to changes in their environment or for short, weekend vacations.  Obviously, it would be difficult and impractical to transport large collections.  Most public transportation systems such as airlines or trains won’t permit live reptiles to be transported and sneaking your reptile on the airplane would be a very poor choice.  If you’re going away for a week or more and will be in a single location during this time, pack up the gecko the same way vendors do when taking their reptiles to a show: place the gecko in a deli cup with holes punched, put the cup in a secure place and transport the cage separately.  This will insure that the gecko isn’t harmed by falling items in its regular enclosure if there’s a sudden stop or an accident.  The gecko will be fine if its exact temperature requirements aren’t met temporarily although running the air conditioning in the car will probably not be appreciated.  Many people have been known to transport their geckos this way if they are going away for the summer or during long college vacations.  I even heard of one person who drove from northeastern United States to Florida with a reptile incubator plugged into her cigarette lighter, though this is a little extreme.  On arrival at the vacation destination, set up the gecko’s enclosure and return the gecko to it.  If the trip will take several days, the gecko can either spend one night in the deli cup (I do this with my geckos when I take them to shows that are a distance away) or can be put into its enclosure overnight.  It’s best not to feed geckos who are going to travel.  Although many will do well, some do regurgitate (maybe they get carsick!).

Leaving Your Gecko at Home

If the gecko or geckos will be left home when you travel, some care will have to be arranged.  As a general rule, most geckos can survive without any intervention for one or two days.  If you plan to be away for a weekend, it’s probably safe to leave your gecko alone, though it’s always a good idea to have someone available in case there’s a  household emergency such as a power outage that will impact the geckos. For longer absences, there are a variety of choices for gecko care:

— the “kennel” approach:   some pet stores, pet sitters or other animal facilities will board your gecko for a daily fee.  The advantage to this solution is that there is experienced personnel on site for extended periods of time and, if you’ve chosen wisely, quality care.  The disadvantages are that it’s expensive and there’s no way to insure that quarantine from other reptiles on the premises will be carried out to your standards.  If you have a friend who’s knowledgeable about geckos and is willing to house your pet while you’re gone (and quarantine it appropriately from any reptile he or she may own), you may be able to overcome all the disadvantages.  I had a very positive experience caring for a pair of leopard geckos that needed medication for several weeks, after responding to a request on craigslist (I don’t recommend this method, but it did work out for me and the gecko owner).

— limited care in the home : For medium length vacations of 1-2 weeks, your gecko can survive without food, though this is not ideal.  Your gecko should do well if there is someone who can come in every day or so, provide water and check to make sure the heat is working adequately.  The “gecko checker” should be comfortable opening the cages and filling water bowls or misting, if necessary.  He or she should have contact information for the gecko owner or other knowledgeable person and should be told what to do in case of emergency such as a power outage, flood or fire.  Back in the days when I had only 1 leopard gecko, my house-sitter agreed to provide water for her when I had to take a 10 day trip across the country.  Although she wasn’t fed during my absence, she was fine when I got back (that was 6 years ago and I still have her) with no obvious weight loss.

— experienced care giver : This alternative is essential for those who have large collections, geckos with special or specific needs, eggs due to hatch or hatchlings.  An experienced gecko caregiver can be paid to come into your home every few days (or daily if you prefer) to provide the care that your collection requires.  The care giver can be a professional pet sitter, a fellow herper, or even someone that you have trained.  It’s essential that you prepare thoroughly.  Cages should be labeled with species and names if appropriate.  Food, including feeders and supplements should be labeled as well.  Provide detailed, written instructions about exactly what you want done with each gecko.  As in the case of the “limited care” described above, be sure to provide written suggestions for how to proceed in case of an emergency and contact information.  If your geckos are under the care of a reptile vet, provide this information as well.  I have found this method to be very successful.  I have a friend who is comfortable and experienced with animal care.  She comes in every 2-3 days on the rare occasions when I go on vacation and provides care according to my written specifications.  She has also checked my incubator for eggs and moved new hatchlings to their enclosures which I had prepared ahead of time.  I’ll never forget her text message to me about a newly hatched leopard gecko that looked different from all the other ones she’d ever seen.  My first super snow!

Going on vacation with or without your gecko is a balancing act.  When deciding how to deal with the situation, you need to weigh your needs and resources against the degree of stress put on your gecko by changes in its habitual routine.  Remember, as you consider all the factors, that both you and your pet are capable of being flexible!

care collection gecko heat trip vacation

What do you think?

gecko travel cage

Written by Aliza

Aliza is a home care speech therapist living in the Boston area. She successfully bred a variety of gecko species between 2005 and 2017. She currently cares for a large number of geckos as well as a few frogs and bearded dragons. Other interests which she pursues in her copious free time include work in ceramics, practicing aikido and surfing the internet.

91 Comments

Me and my husband just got a white lined gecko. We are about to leave for vacation for a week or two. Now we have heard we can put live crickets in there jus enough for him to eat hes an adult so. We have a humidifier n we have both that and the lamp for his heat set at certian times for it to come on so sofar its been working good he wont eat the dry or dead meal worms n crickets so should we jus put enough crickets in there for if he gets hungry he can get them. The crickets like to hide up top where there is a crease between top on tank near lamp you think he will be fine? If were only gone for a week or two. Is there anything specific we should do to make sure hes good. Or ok while we are gone

My get go got out and we can not find him, he is in the house somewhere. Any ideals on how to find him and how long will it live without food

Read this article in Gecko Time: http://geckotime.com/finding-an-escaped-gecko/

Some can go for months because they find bugs in the house.

Hi Aliza…

Just wanna ask,is it stressing the gecko when we bring it to travel….?? Its now 3 months old…more less,but if I left it in my house(no one is in my house during that time) what should I do? Put many mealworms? AND IT JUST ARRIVED IN MY HOUSE YESTERDAY..

Should I bring… OR Should I left…. ???????

Thank you..:-)

If there’s no one to take care of it while you’re gone, and you’re going away for more than a weekend, you will need to bring it with you unless you can bring it to someone else’s house while you’re gone. Hopefully you’re going to a single vacation spot where you will be staying. If that’s the case, travel with the gecko in a deli cup and set up its home when you get to your destination. If you’re going to be on the road for awhile with many stops, please find a friend to care for it or a pet store where you can board it.

If you are going on vacation do not leave a lot of crickets in with your gecko This is because the crickets will get hungry and can possibly eat the geckos eyes or tail off which could get infected and this will be harmful to the gecko or possibly kill the gecko So whatever you do, do not just put a bunch of crickets in the turrarium with the gecko if you go away. Thank you for reading

I just bought a leopard gecko Saturday a baby. He won’t eat.He has blue on his stomach was thwre when I bought it. I heard it was impacted? I’ve tried warm baths and stomach massages and he still doesn’t eat. And when I try and give him the meal worm or crickets he backs away or kinda lays down?

The blue may just be some of its internal organs. It’s not unusual for a new gecko not to eat for awhile. For now, leave it alone and just keep providing the food. Check back in a week if it’s not eating after that.

I have had my babies for about 2 years. I am actually moving to Japan in 6-7 years and I want them to go with me. But I’m worried that flying isn’t the best option. Any recommendations?

A lot of things can happen in 6-7 years with your babies, with flying laws and all sorts of stuff. I recommend that when the times gets closer, you investigate the laws about what you’re allowed to take with you and look at your options then. Remember, that every time a gecko is shipped from one place to another, it goes on a plane.

Hi Aliza! I will be getting an AFT about 4 months old, still considered young.

About once or twice a month, I’ll drive to visit family who live 2 hours away from town. I am wondering if she can come with me so I can feed her every day and provide fresh water? I would be stationary at home.

I would recommend you time it so you give your AFT a chance to settle in before you travel with her. If you’re going for a weekend or so, you can really leave food and water for her and she’ll be fine. If you really want to take her with you, get a small carry container, small enough so she won’t slide around in it too much, for transport. Set up a cage for her with your family so she can transfer to a “permanent” enclosure while she’s there. In general, she’ll probably do better staying at home.

Hi!! I have had this adult leopard gecko, and i took her in the car with me for the day, and i think she is having a carsick… she didn’t vomit, but she is sleeping non stop for few hours already, and i am worried because she might be stressed

She may be less active because she got stressed, or even because she got cold and it slowed her down. Try not to worry about it. Leave her alone and give her some time to relax. Stress isn’t the worst thing in the world and eventually she’ll get over it.

Hello! I was wondering if it is okay to take my gecko around with me on my shoulder for the day. One of my friends brings his bearded dragon around and just puts her on his shoulder. I was wondering if it is okay to do that with a gecko. Mine is about a year and a half old and is sometimes a bit sensitive but other that that, he’s fine.

I’ve had leopard geckos that have been comfortable on my shoulder. Remember, though, that it’s easier to feel a beardie getting restless than a leo so you have to be really aware of when it’s had enough.

I will be going on a four day vacation and I am pretty sure I’m going to take my gecko with me, but the trip to the hotel is about 4 1/2 hours will she be okay?

Get a deli cup or other small plastic container. Put your gecko in there for the trip and bring along a set-up for the gecko while you’re on vacation (don’t drive with the gecko in the cage; it will slide around too much). If you stop for a meal, don’t leave your gecko in the car because it will get too hot. Get a canvas bag, put the deli cup in the bag and bring it into the restaurant. Don’t make a big production about having a gecko in the bag. There’s no reason for anyone to know what’s in there. Enjoy your trip.

Hi there, I am moving away and I will be taking a three and a half hour plane ride and I really want to take my leopard gecko with me. I have no idea how old he is but I’ve owned him for about 5 years now. I’m really worried about him getting too stressed out on the plane as the company says he will have to be put in the cargo area I’m just worried he could stress to the point of passing away. Will he survive ?

There are 2 ways you can get the gecko to your new destination: 1. check out “Delta Dash” which is an air service that will transport your gecko to an airport near you. 2. package up your gecko and mail it to the FedEx hub nearest you and have them hold it for you In either case, check out http://www.shipyourreptiles.com for instructions about how to package up your gecko for shipment. If you follow those directions, you may even be able to send your gecko along with you in the cargo hold (the gecko will be traveling in the cargo hold for both of the two options above and next day air shipment of geckos is very common and safe).

I’m going on a 10 day vacation tomorrow and I’m leaving my leopard gecko at home with no one coming to take care of him. I just bought him 15 large crickets so he won’t be hungry while I’m gone. I’m not sure if I should leave the heat lamp on the entire trip or keep it off. Also, will he be fine with not having the water cleaned/changed daily? And can you tell me more about what misting is? My brother gave him to me late last year and he wasn’t very good with handling Raj (my lizard). Can you give me some advice on how to start actually holding him? He’s tried to bite my finger once and I’m afraid he might do it again. Thank you. It’d be helpful if you replied tonight, because I’m leaving tomorrow. 🙂

The food isn’t as important as the water. Leaving the crickets is fine. Can you possibly get someone to re-fill the water bowl every few days? It doesn’t have to be daily. Ideally you should be using an under tank heater as opposed to a heat lamp because the heat lamp will dry out the air a lot, but that’s for another day when you’re not leaving. Misting: this means spraying the cage with water. You don’t need to do that with a leopard gecko, so don’t worry about it. Handling: When you get back from vacation, talk to him every time you feed him. Let him see that you’re the one feeding him. See if he’ll let you put your hand near him. If you can, eventually, slide your hand under him and lift him gently, supporting his body. Just hold him a few inches above the cage floor and then put him down. When that seems to be working well (after a couple of times), try making a little cave for him out of your hands when you pick him up and lift him to the top of the cage. Good luck and enjoy your vacation.

No :/ I’ve tried asking a few people I trust but most of them are in vacation. I know that the water won’t dry out, but he likes to walk in the bowl sometimes so it gets dirty fast. Another question, ive heard other owners say they bathe theirs? How is this supposed to be done and is it required? I’m trying to be a good caretaker. Thank you.

He’ll be OK. They’re desert animals so don’t need bathing unless they have stuck shed. If you need more info about taking care of the gecko, read some of the articles on this site (www.geckotime.com/archives – check out the list of articles that have been written) or read my personal care sheet: https://geckcessories.wordpress.com/leopard-gecko-care-sheet/

This is a tough spot to be in! Luckily I have a friend/business partner that can keep everything taken care of for me when I leave. There should be another article on here about what to do with a collection during a storm since a lot of people had to learn this the hard way with the hurricane we just had.

Hi, I am wanting to get a Crested Gecko, i travel just about once every month for work and will be gone each time for a week. Will my gecko be okay if i leave it for a week? Or is it absolutely needed for it to have someone mist/water it. I would like to take it with me at least sometime, the drive is 9 hours, will it be okay that long of a car ride in the container?

It can probably survive without being misted for a week (especially if there are live plants to hold the humidity and a water bowl) but it would be best to get someone in halfway through the week to mist, in my opinion.

You could also consider getting an automatic, programmable mist system (e.g. mistking.com)

Hello Aliza. Your advice and tips are wonderful! Thank you for spending time responding to our many questions. My daughter purchased a gecko yesterday, and in our excitement forgot about leaving for a couple of days for the holiday. I am unclear about the lighting. Do we leave the black night light on, or the daylight on, or nothing on. ??

Why kind of gecko did she get? Is the light the only source of heat? If she got a leopard gecko, they don’t really need light at all as long as they are getting heat from the bottom of the enclosure and there is ambient light in the room. In any case, it’s easy to get a timer for the lights if you feel the gecko needs them.

I have a young African Fat Tail Gecko (not sure of the exact age) and I will be leaving for a 4 day trip. I am trying to make things as simple as I can for the neighbor who has agreed to take care of her while I am gone. I will ask her to mist the cage and change the water daily, but my question is about lighting. I have an under tank heater, and I switch between a white light during the day and a black light at night. Do I need to have her switch lights, or would it be okay to just have one or the other while I’m gone?

If you don’t have the lights on the timer, just turn them both off as long as there is some ambient light in the room. Otherwise, you could have the neighbor turn the white light on and off. Unless there are live plants in the enclosure, the gecko doesn’t really need the lights at all and certainly doesn’t need the black light.

Hi, I am going on vacation for 5 days and I was wondering if leaving my gecko with mealworms, a water reservoir, under tank heat mat plus the vitamin D on a dish would be enough for those days? I have no one to look over him and Im really worried. Also, in terms of its poop. Will leaving the poop in the cage for a few days be an issue of bacteria? All of this gets me worried.

I would highly appreciate your thoughts on this. Thank you.

5 days is probably the longest period that works adequately. I’ve had to do it a few times this year. Usually I get someone to check in once and mist the tropical geckos (I have a lot of geckos), but once this winter the person forgot to do it and everyone was fine. Geckos can easily go quite awhile without food. Be sure you have a deep enough water dish so it doesn’t dry up (and even if it does, it probably won’t be till the last day or so). The poop is fine in the cage for that amount of time. Enjoy your vacation.

Thank you so much Aliza. Also, for the quick response. Very helpful. Thanks again.

I’m planning on getting a Crested Gecko, but I need to set up a travel plan first. I have a 1-week vacation every six weeks, and I have no clue what to do with it. I’m not sure I will be able to take it with me, or if somebody could keep an eye on it. I know all they need is a gecko-smoothie, so is there a way I could create a week’s worth and leave it in the tank? Will misting be a problem for 1 week? Or is there some sort of 5-gal travel tank I can bring (I have a 10-gal)?

Do you go away for the whole week every time? Do you go to the same place? How do you get there? I have left my geckos for a maximum of 5 days. The crested geckos did fine without being misted in that time (I misted them well right before I left). If you could get someone to mist even once in a week long period, it would probably be fine. If you go to the same place and could have an enclosure for him there, and if you drive, or take a bus or train to where you’re going, you could put the gecko in a deli cup, and then put it in the “vacation enclosure” when you arrive. If you’re planning to get a very young one, by the way, a 10 gallon will be fine, but you’ll need something bigger for an adult (though a 10 gallon at the vacation location will do fine).

I am getting a leopard gecko and will be leaving to go on a 4 day vacation in an RV. I was planning on just leaving him home and was curious if that was okay to do.

I have left my geckos for 4-5 days without a problem. Make sure you feed it right before you leave and have a water bowl deep enough so you don’t run out of water while you’re gone.

Hello, I’m going to travel across the country from Colorado to Michigan, so its about a 20 hour drive. What are the recommended traveling precautions i should take, as in what should he be in while i travel? Also will he be okay without the UV light for 20 hours straight? i will not have the a/c on as it does not work. Thanks in advance

I’m not sure what kind of gecko you’re talking about, but I’d assume a crestie. I’d recommend putting him in a deli cup with holes punched. If you’re going to be staying places overnight, get a small cage so he can be a bit less confined overnight. The absence of UV is not a problem. Don’t leave him in the car if you make a stop for lunch or something. Get a small canvas bag, put the deli cup in there and don’t say anything to the restaurant people. Have a good trip.

If I pick up a leopard gecko as I am leaving vacation, will it be able to stay in the car for 30 hours? It’s a baby no more than a couple weeks but if I put it in a well insulated container during the summer will it be ok?

It depends on what’s going to be happening for those 30 hours. If you mean you’ll be driving somewhere and making stops, you could keep it in the car but whenever you get out I recommend you take the gecko with you (put the container in a canvas bag and don’t advertise what you’re carrying. If you mean can you leave the gecko alone in the car that’s not traveling for 30 hours, I wouldn’t recommend it.

Hello, I want a crested gecko, i never travel much, only 2 hours away every 3-4 months. I dont know. And am away for one night, a few times a month, and what is (in your experience the best choice of food for cresties.?) I have heard they don’t need much floor space as a cage just more heighth. Is that correct? Do they need heating lamps? Or cooling systems?

Thank you! I

You’re correct that they are arboreal, so they need a taller cage. As long as the temperatures in the room are reasonable for humans, it should be OK for the crested gecko. Generally, temperatures above the low 80’s (F) aren’t recommended, though in my experience a day or two of high heat should be OK. Crested geckos mostly eat some form of re-hydrated “Crested gecko diet” (CGD) and also enjoy crickets. They don’t need to eat every day so going away for a night isn’t a problem. Based on the questions you’re asking, I highly recommend you read a care sheet or a book about crested geckos before getting one.

I have a a trip next week for about four days and my gecko is still growing, it is not exactly an adult yet. should I just give it water and leave? I need advice please.

Give it a generous feeding and water before you leave. It will probably be fine.

So I have been really reasearching crested geckos and I really want to get one, but in the summer I am going away for 10 days and cannot bring my gecko with me. I can ask my family to mist them while I’m gone, but they don’t know anything about geckos and I’m afraid they might do something wrong. Also, would it be ok if I just left the food in the cage for the duration of my trip?

This is my opinion: one solution would be to wait to get the gecko until you come back. You can also check in to local boarding opportunities (some of the non big-box pet stores may do this). If you decide to get the gecko before vacation and can’t find a place to board it, it will be really important not to get a young juvenile. An older gecko would do better. I think you can teach someone how to mist the cage; it’s not that hard. I also think the gecko, if provided with enough humidity and hydration (which they get with the misting) would probably be OK without being fed for that period of time. It’s not ideal, but I think it could work out.

I have a question for you. Can I bring Phoenix (crested gecko) in Arizona. I little bit concerned about temperate is 120 degree. Can kill any reptiles? Thanks Aliza.

Are you asking whether you can take the crested gecko to Arizona for a vacation, or whether you can have a crested gecko in Arizona? In my experience, if the temperature is high for a few days (I live in New England and have no AC, so it can get into the 90’s in my living room in the summer on occasion) the crested gecko will probably be OK. If it will be in 120 degree temperatures for days and days, it might not do well. If it gets really hot I put ice packs in the cages. If you send a few more details, I may be able to give a better answer.

Leading up to the trip should you feed them the same amount of food that you would normally or should you feed them more ?

They’re only going to eat as much as they have room for, so it kind of doesn’t matter. If you’re going to be away without feeding them for awhile, you could put some extra in there to tide them over, though they do fine fasting for a short time.

I read a suggestion about a tupperwear container with a hole, like a moist hide, with mealworms in it. I’m going on a cruise this winter and I’m looking for options. Thoughts? I’m also an SLP!

If you get a container, make holes in it for air and put powdered grain gutload in it, the mealworms will be fine for the duration of the cruise.

Hello, I am going home for Christmas for 3 weeks and I have no one to feed my leo gecko while I am away. Therefore, I plan on taking him with me, however, I am unsure what precautions I should take. The trip is approximately 4 hours away and the last hour and a half is a pretty bumpy ride. My gecko is pretty cool with anything and loves being handled, however, does not do so well in small spaces, therefore, I don’t think he will be okay in a deli cup. I live in -20 degree weather, so i know ill have to have the car heated before I bring him out, but, I am looking for any more recommendations for my trip. Thank you!

I have driven from Boston to NY in January with a car load of geckos to do a show, so I know it can be done. If you feel your gecko won’t do well in a deli cup, get a 6 qt. plastic tub with a lid (or larger if desired). Cut a square hole in the lid and hot-glue some mesh over the hole, or else just make some holes in the sides (a soldering iron works really well). Put a very light weight hide in there as well. Even if you get into an unheated car, it will be warm within a few minutes so it’s not really a problem. It would be great if you can take a more permanent enclosure with heat along for your stay. Your gecko should be fine, even the bumpy part of the ride.

I am going to Texas over the summer and I’m planning to get a leopard gecko with all the necessary accessories. However, it will be a juvenile leo and I’m not sure how to go about carrying it. The drive will be 18 hours and for three weeks, so I was planning on bringing a pack of mealworms and calcium but should I have a little carrying cage or my 24x24x18 cage in the car? It would be rather awkward carrying it considering I’ll have 3 others in the car with me. Any help would be greatly appreciated. I was planning on using the little portable hand held cage but I’m not sure how I’d go about heating/cooling it. Thanks.

I’m assuming you’re going to Texas for 3 weeks and it’s an 18 hour drive each way? If that’s the case you have several options. I recommend you get a 10 gallon traveling cage. Get some Zoo-med 11′ heat cable (pretty cheap on Ebay) and some Nashua tape from Home Depot or equivalent and get a thermostat. When you’re driving, keep the gecko in the 10 gallon with a lightweight hide, so it won’t get hurt if something slides. If you stop for lunch or something, don’t leave the gecko in the car because it will get too hot. You should have either a deli cup with holes or a small critter keeper that you can put the gecko in. Put that smaller enclosure in a canvas bag and don’t tell the restaurant people that you’re carrying a gecko around. When you get to your stop for the day, plug in the heater and feed/water the gecko. It may not eat too much but it should be OK. Alternatively, you could look into finding someone to care for it while you’re gone.

I am going out of town for five days and may not have someone available every day to check on my Leos. The big issue here for me is that there won’t be anyone to switch over their night and day lights. Would it be detrimental to leave the night bulb on while I am away? Or is there a better way to go about this? Thanks for the help!

If there is light in the room where they are, I don’t see any need to do anything with the lights in the cage. If there is no light in the room where they are, if you could get a lamp and a timer and have it on for 12 hours and off for 12 hours that should do it. I have a lot of leopard geckos and none of them have any lights except for daylight coming in through the window and everyone is fine.

I’m going on a trip that requires a bit of driving… I was hoping I could bring my young crested gecko along with me. I got the little one at repticon and it (not 100% sure on gender yet) didn’t seem to have any problems with the car ride home and actually fell asleep. I would be at a beach and then the mountains and it’s about a eight-ten day trip (not sure on exact return date). I have a lot of anxiety on vacations and Chimera (my crestie) has been my own little support gecko. This also means that I’m not as “out and about” as the rest of my family members on vacation. I would be in the place we’re staying often, but I will be going out to the beach occasionally or on hikes in the mountain which would leave my crested gecko alone for an hour or so. The temperature isn’t extreme where we’re going and we’ll have a thermostat as well. I was thinking of using the 10 gal enclosure I have with the substrate I usually use. I would provide a small hide since Chimera is pretty small and I may even cut in half a roll from paper towels. I have things for climbing that I can also place in the enclosure that are light and pose no threat if they fall over. Would this work out or should I try and find someone to watch the little one? Most people I trust with my animals won’t be around when I’m away which is why I rather bring Chimera with me, but if it could put Chimera in danger I would want to know. I also would love suggestions on how to improve my enclosure plan. I may also have two geckos by our next trip and have two enclosures I can set up like this, I was hoping to get someone’s advice to see if my plan would be okay. Thank you heaps!!!

I have my leopard gecko on a day and night cycle light where I have to switch it every twelve hours. I’m going on vacation and don’t have someone to switch his lighting or do anything for him. What do I do about that

Go to Home Depot or equivalent. Get a timer that you can plug your light into and then plug the timer into the wall. Set it the way you want and you can use it all the time.

It sounds fine to me. I tend to feel that most geckos are pretty hardy and can take lots of changes. Other people will feel differently.

i am going on a trip to the beach from sunday morning to wednesday night i have no one to watch Hoops “my gecko” so i got the whole lighting system to work, i used automatic lights, but my question is can my leopard gecko go that long without food, could i feed him sunday morning and wednesday night because then it would only be two days without food. but the problem is i don’t know how old he is except that he is 5 to 6 inches long would you be able to determine the age please?

I have no way to determine age. However, I have geckos that don’t eat (by choice) for weeks. I have left my geckos, even when I had juveniles, for that long before with no problem. Just give them extra before you go and if you think their water will get dry, find a deeper water bowl.

I am going on vacation to Cali. around October, and I have a leopard gecko named Max. I will be gone for about 4 days, and not sure about what to do with my gecko. Will Max be okay if I don’t feed him for that long? Also, I’m not sure what to do about his lamp and if I should leave it on or off. Should I feed him extra before I leave and extra when I come back? I really appreciate any help, this is my first pet and I want to make sure to do the right thing. Thanks!

If you’re also heating with an under tank heater, and there’s light in the room he’s in, leave the light off. If you need the light for heat (under tank heater is better), get a timer and set it up. If you can get a deep enough water bowl so he’ll have water, use that. Put some food in right before you go and he’ll be fine.

I’m leaving for 2 days for my birthday would it be okay to leave my crested gecko without someone to mist them? I dont know anyone where I live she also has 2 eggs so I’m super worried

I have left my crested geckos for up to 4 days without misting. When you say that she has eggs, do you mean that she’s gravid and hasn’t laid the eggs yet, or that she has laid the eggs and they’re buried in the substrate? In the wild, there are probably times when it doesn’t rain so much, so I would imagine you’re OK

I am going on a long weekend trip for 4 days. I have a approx 3 month old Leo — I do not have anyone that can come check on it while I am gone. I have done a little bit of research short of calling my local pet shop for their advice. Some sites say a baby leo cannot go an extended period of time without eating and others say they would be fine for that length of time. What do you suggest?

My only other option is to bring my leo to my sisters house and have her geckosit, but I feel that could be excessive with moving his enclosure around.

In my opinion, it’s not ideal but it’s doable. I’ve done it before with a houseful of hatchlings during the summer. Find a water dish deep enough so the water will last. Put in extra feeders. It should be fine.

I just purchased a fancy gecko several days ago that has yet to eat. I purchased a feeding starter kit that consisted of dried/dead crickets, calcium powder and dried mealworms(a separate container of dried mealworms in a separate bottle also)…I understand that it may be temporarily stressed but also read that you should avoid feeding them any insects that aren’t alive? What do you recommend?

I don’t know where you read that you shouldn’t feed them any insects that aren’t already alive. Most leopard geckos will not eat anything that’s not moving, so it’s not surprising that the gecko won’t eat the dried insects. You need to get live mealworms and/or crickets. Two things to be aware of: –it is true that some leopard geckos can take a week or more to settle into a new place and may not eat during that time –some people do say that any live insects left in the cage after 15-30 minutes should be removed so they don’t hurt the gecko. In my experience, this does not usually occur and, especially with a new gecko, it’s a good idea to leave the feeders in the enclosure to give the gecko time to feel comfortable enough to eat them. I also recommend you google some more leopard gecko care sheets and see what they have to say about care and feeding.

Helloooooo this is a cool website thanks for all the tips!!!

Im moving to Alaska with a gargoyle gecko. Will the temperature be ok for him?

can my beardie be left at home for 27 days without care?

I wouldn’t recommend it. How will he get water? What if the light burns out? I think he can be OK enough with minimal care which would include him being checked on at least once a week, fresh water provided (I know beardies don’t usually drink from a bowl, but they can, and, obviously if he doesn’t get any food he won’t have any source of hydration), either live feeders or greens provided. Some pet stores board beardies and you may also be able to pay someone to do this minimal care, which is what I do when I go away.

Are you asking about the temperatures while you’re transporting him or the temperatures when he’s living in Alaska with you? Presumably you will be in a house where the temperature is comfortable for you, meaning, at least in the mid 60’s. If that’s the case, he will be fine. If you’re going to have things colder than that, you will need to give him a heating pad or a ceramic heat emitter to keep the inside of his cage at least n the 60’s

My female leopard gecko has not eaten for a few months after summer into fall and winter.

It’s not unusual for geckos not to eat for awhile. Mine stuff themselves from August into early September and all of a sudden most of them stop eating very much at all. If the gecko isn’t visibly losing weight it’s probably fine.

Hi! I really want a Crested Gecko, but my parents want to know if / how the Gecko will survive a 9 hour car journey, + how the gecko will thrive when we arrive without a terrarium (since there is no room in the car with 5 people plus luggage ), before I can get one. I also need to know what to do with the gecko when I have arrived at where we will be a few days / weeks, depending on the holiday / events. If I can travel far and short with the gecko without problems, and be in another place possibly without his / her terrarium, I will be allowed to buy the gecko, according to my parents. I hope you have some good advice! I really want a Crested Gecko because I have wanted it for a long time, and I need a little friend who can support me in everyday life. Thank you so much for the tips!

I’m not quite sure of the exact situation. Are you saying that if you get a crested gecko, you’ll be making a 9 hour trip the same day, or that when you go on vacations it’s usually 9 hours away. So here’s my general response without knowing the exact situation: a crested gecko can travel in a deli cup with holes punched in the sides for air. This keeps the gecko from suffocating in the plastic. You can buy deli cups with holes punched in the sides of the actual cup or you can make small holes in the sides of a 16oz deli cup that you could buy from a food store that sells things in cups like that. The gecko will be able to tolerate the drive as long as you don’t leave it in the car for more than a few minutes when you make a stop (it will be too hot in the summer and too cold in the winter with the car not running). The best way to deal with this is to put the deli cup in a nice canvas bag, take it into the restaurant or hotel, and don’t make a big deal about what you’re doing. Once you arrive you will need some place to keep the gecko. You can do this for awhile by getting a plastic tub with a cover from a store like Target. While you’re traveling, take the cover off the tub and put other luggage inside. Read up on the things that need to be in the “terrarium” and have those separately as well. When you arrive, set up the temporary vivarium. When you’re ready to go back home, pack it up the same way.

Hi! I have to be out of town from Thursday-Sunday (leaving Thursday afternoon and returning Sunday night). I have a ~4 month old leopard gecko with no one to feed her while I am away. Will she be okay if I leave extra food in her dish before leaving tomorrow (and of course filling her water)? How many mealworms should I leave in her bowl? Thank you!

Fill her bowl with mealworms (don’t worry how many), and fill the water bowl. If the bowl is shallow use a bigger one. It should be fine.

I’m going in vacation for about a week and can’t bring my leopard gecko with me. Is it ok for me bring her to a friend’s house so they can watch her for me? I have a second cage that’s a little smaller that she can stay in while she’s there

It should be fine. Just make sure there’s heat in the smaller cage.

Hello I love your website.I am think about getting a leachianus gecko and I am wondering how long can they go without food if i go on a vacation?

The most important thing is that they get access to water, which means that the cage gets misted at least every other day (when you’re home, they get misted every day but if you’re away every other day should do it). My leachie seems to go quite awhile sometimes without eating, even when food is offered, so I don’t think that’s too much of an issue. It would be important to find someone to come in and mist the cage every other day or to find a place to board it if you can’t find anyone to take care of this in your home.

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Gecko Advice

How to Travel with a Leopard Gecko (8 Easy Steps)

*This post contains affiliate links, if you buy through a link on this post we may receive a commission.

Traveling with a Leopard Gecko may seem daunting. Nonetheless, with the correct planning and know-how, your gecko can travel safely, and your journey can remain stress-free. Find all suggestions, tips, and advice here. 

Traveling to a vet, on an extended holiday, or moving house may result in your leopard gecko being transported by car, train, or plane. Proper fore planning and carrier familiarisation are crucial, along with after-travel attention and maintenance. 

gecko travel cage

Table of Contents

Traveling with a Leopard Gecko

Before arranging your travels, it is essential to consider the type of care you require and what mode of transport is needed. 

Consider the degree of care needed

Your Leopard Gecko is always happiest when left in its enclosure at home. When it comes to the health and wellbeing of your gecko, the less disruption to their environment, the better. 

Your Leopard gecko can survive a day or two with no intervention. A weekend away should not cause them any harm, but if you have someone that can pop in, in the case of a power surge, that would be best.  

If it is possible to leave your Leopard Gecko at home when traveling, then do so. A fully prepped family friend or fellow Leopard Gecko enthusiast would be first prize, but there are local vets or pet sitters that can also assist. 

Although more expensive, local vets and pet sitters charge daily to care for your geckos. A trained sitter with detailed instructions is essential if you have multiple geckos with special needs. 

However, leopard geckos do not get lonely so don’t worry about their emotional health. The only reason to get a pet sitter would be to make sure they are fed and watered regularly.

Airplanes, trains, and Leopard Gecko travel

Few airplanes and trains permit reptiles, and those that do are expensive. Airplanes will insist on having your Leopard gecko checked in as cargo. 

I would only recommend traveling in a plane if you are relocating, as flying can be stressful for you and your geckos. 

Proper carrier labeling is imperative, and if you can maintain a carrier temperature of approximately 27 degrees Celsius (80 degrees Fahrenheit) for the trip, this would be optimal. 

Try to book a nonstop early morning or late night flight to avoid the heat of the day and start getting your Leopard Gecko accustomed to its carrier at least a month before you intend to travel. 

Steps for traveling by car with your Leopard Gecko

Car trips can be short or long-distance overnight journeys. Both need a degree of preparation to ensure that you and your Leopard Gecko have a peaceful, stress-free trip. 

Seeing that car journeys are far more commonly taken with Leopard Geckos than plane or train rides, we will outline some essential steps and precautions when planning a trip. 

Step 1: Consider how to transport Leo

It may be tempting to transport your Leopard Gecko in their existing enclosure. However, there are a couple of factors to be aware of. 

Existing enclosure travel concerns

If your gecko’s current enclosure is glass, I would, for obvious safety reasons, avoid transporting them in it.  

You would also need to remove all enclosure décor or objects that may tip over and injure Leo during a trip. A larger enclosure also increases the risk of Leo sliding and injuring themselves with any sudden car movements. 

A smaller carrier is best

When transporting Leopard Geckos in a car, it is usually advisable to place them in a smaller well-ventilated plastic container or Tupperware. Any plastic container can be used as long as it has air holes, or you can poke air holes in it. 

Take care to select a large container to allow Leo to move around but not too large that they are flung about with movement. I would strongly advise against any open-topped containers. You can purchase reptile travel carriers online and in pet stores if you want something sturdier. 

Step 2: Set up the travel carrier

Add carrier floor covering.

It is advisable to add a covering to the bottom of your travel carrier. This will provide extra protection and security during travel, and if the weather is cooler, some added warmth. 

Depending on your required insulation, you can use newspaper, pads, paper towels, or blankets. This will ensure that your Leopard Gecko does not slide with any car movement and will add some added grip. 

Add extra warmth

Leopard geckos can go up to 90 days without heat so additional warmth for a short trip to the vet will most likely not be needed unless you are dealing with extreme weather. 

A more extended trip may call for some added heat to keep your Leopard Gecko comfortable. Heat packs or hand warmers are great for keeping your gecko warm for several hours. You can purchase reptile-specific hand warmers made explicitly for travel online and in some exotic pet stores. 

On shorter trips, many gecko owners have successfully used a hot water bottle for added heat.

Covering or wrapping your carrier with jerseys and blankets will also help with heat loss.

On the flip side, if you are concerned about too much heat, you can wrap the carrier with insulated bubble wrap to block out the sun and prevent heat absorption. Bubble wrap can be cut to size but also remember to add some air holes. 

Step 3: Travel carrier familiarity

Purchase your travel container or carrier at least one week before leaving for your trip. You need to provide enough time for your Leopard Gecko to familiarize themselves with the carrier before leaving. 

Incorporate a couple of minutes of travel carrier time into your Leopard Geckos’ regular schedule. Do this daily and keep adding a few extra minutes until they are happy spending up to 30 minutes daily in the new carrier. 

One week of getting accustomed to the travel carrier is sufficient, but if you have the time to start earlier, it will only help. Getting your Leopard Gecko used to the carrier will help to reduce their stress levels during travel.

Step 4: Pack your travel essentials

A short drive to your local vet will not need the same planning as an extended trip away. 

Here is an extensive checklist of essentials for your next car trip.  

  • Plastic container / Tupperware / carrier 
  • Insulated bubble wrap or blankets and jerseys
  • Food, water, and calcium
  • Small plastic containers
  • Vehicle harness
  • Emergency contact list: vet numbers

Optional – long-distance trips

  • Newspaper, paper towels, or pads 
  • Hand warmers, heat packs, hot water bottle 
  • Gloves, cleaning supplies, hand sanitizer
  • Spray bottle with water 
  • Thermometer

Overnight travel

  • Basking light 

Step 5: Secure and prep the carrier

Before leaving, you must prep and secure the carrier or container for the journey ahead. 

This would involve securing your carrier to the car with a harness, insulating the carrier with blankets or bubble wrap, and ensuring you have all the essentials on hand. 

If you decide to add hides to the carrier, ensure they are secured down with duct tape or something similar. 

Many Leopard Gecko owners prefer to secure their carriers in the front passenger seat so they can better keep an eye on their geckos during the trip. 

If this is not possible, the backseat or a secure spot on the floor can also work. Ensure that wherever you position the carrier, there is no risk of them toppling over or items dropping on them.  

Try to position the carrier where direct sunlight will not cause a problem or use bubble wrap as protection. Close off or position your carrier away from aircon or heating vents to protect them from getting too hot or cold. 

Step 7: In journey checks and safety 

It is important to remember not to remove your Leopard Gecko from its carrier for the duration of the journey unless necessary. This will add unnecessary stress to an already agitated gecko. 

You will need to check up more frequently on your Leopard Gecko on longer journeys. Look out for abnormal behavior and try to stick to their usual schedule as much as possible . 

Check that your Leopard Gecko is eating and drinking enough, and on extended trips, stick to housekeeping schedules by clearing out any feces or left-over food. 

You do not need to be too concerned if your Leopard Gecko does not want to eat or drink unless this continues for an extended period. Leopard Geckos can go without food for up to 10 days. Although this is unhealthy, a day of not feeding will not kill them.

It is normal for geckos to temporarily refrain from eating when stressed. If you are concerned about them not eating or they are behaving oddly, it may be time to pull your emergency list out and give your vet a call for some advice. 

Step 8: Post-travel care

Travel can be stressful for Leopard Geckos.  Being placed in a new environment with new smells, sights, and sounds can be unnerving. 

Once you arrive at your destination, give your Leopard Gecko time to settle into its new environment. Your gecko may be scared. If it shies away from your presence, refrain from handling them until they are comfortable in their surroundings. 

A Leopard Gecko can exhibit signs of stress for seven days up to a month. Typically, they will return to normal within a week or two, but more time may be needed in severe cases. 

How to tell your Leopard Gecko is stressed

A stressed or anxious Leopard Gecko may not eat or drink and may even regurgitate its food. They may become lethargic , change color, or hide in the corners of their enclosure. Their defecations may also increase, decrease, or alter in appearance. 

You may notice bruises, inflammation, swelling, or sores if they have been injured during travel. In more severe cases, they may struggle to walk, look disorientated, or battle to breathe. Excessive saliva or bubbling from their nostrils may indicate a breathing issue. 

If any of this behavior persists or is of concern, it is always best to visit a local vet or arrange a telephonic conversation if still journeying.  

Final thoughts

Your Leopard Gecko may feel part of the family but leaving them home when taking a trip is usually a safer choice. A gecko enthusiast or prepped family member or sitter can help ease any anxiety when traveling for an extended period. 

If you must journey with your gecko, careful planning before leaving is vital to ensure a safe and stress-free trip. Knowing how to handle your Leopard Gecko after a journey is as crucial as putting their carrier and essentials in order before leaving. 

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Furry Folly

10 Best Leopard Gecko Carriers for Safe Travel: A Comprehensive Review and Buying Guide

Are you planning a vacation and feeling guilty about leaving your beloved leopard gecko behind? Or maybe you have to move to a new city and are worried about how to transport your pet safely? Whatever the reason may be, traveling with a pet is no easy feat, especially when it comes to reptiles like leopard geckos. They require a delicate and secure environment to ensure their wellbeing during transit.

Fortunately, there are numerous leopard gecko carriers available in the market that can make traveling with them a breeze. In this comprehensive review and buying guide, we will walk you through the top 10 leopard gecko carriers that provide a safe and comfortable transport option for your pet.

Leopard Gecko Carrier

  • 1 Best Leopard Gecko Carrier
  • 2 1. Zoo Med ReptiBreeze Open Air Screen Cage
  • 3 2. Exo Terra Breeding Box
  • 4 3. Lee’s Kritter Keeper
  • 5 4. Reptile Tubs
  • 6 5. Komodo Habitat Moss Box
  • 7 6. Exo Terra Faunarium
  • 8 7. Leew Pet Reptile Carrier
  • 9 8. Exo Terra Faunarium Large Flat Home
  • 10 9. Lee’s All-Purpose Animal Carrier
  • 11 10. Zoo Med ReptiHabitat Leopard Gecko Kit
  • 12 Conclusion

Best Leopard Gecko Carrier

Bearded Dragon Carrier,Lizards Carrier, Small Animal Travel Carrier for Hedgehog Rat Parrot Bird Guinea Pig, Portable Guinea Pig Travel Carrier for 2(Grey)

1. Zoo Med ReptiBreeze Open Air Screen Cage

The Zoo Med ReptiBreeze Open Air Screen Cage offers a spacious and breathable environment for your leopard gecko to travel in. It comes in varying sizes, with the small 16x16x20 inch size being the most suitable for transport. The lightweight mesh material allows for ample ventilation, reducing any concerns about overheating. The cage has a secure locking door mechanism and is easy to assemble and disassemble, making it a convenient option for travel purposes.

2. Exo Terra Breeding Box

The Exo Terra Breeding Box is designed with compactness and portability in mind. It is structured like a shoebox, making it easy to carry around without taking up too much space. The box is made of sturdy plastic that can withstand any bumps and jostles during transportation. It has a secure snap lock lid, ensuring your leopard gecko cannot escape or fall out during the journey. The Exo Terra Breeding Box comes in two sizes, with the small one measuring 7.8×5.8×3 inches, ideal for short trips and easy storage.

3. Lee’s Kritter Keeper

Lee’s Kritter Keeper is a see-through plastic container that offers excellent ventilation for your leopard gecko during travel. It comes in various sizes, with the large 11×7.6×8.3 inches size being the best option for transporting adult geckos. The container has a snap-tight lid, keeping your pet safe and contained, and the plastic material is sturdily built to avoid cracking during transport.

4. Reptile Tubs

Reptile Tubs make for an easy and affordable travel carrier option without compromising on convenience and safety. They come in different sizes, and the smaller ones, like the 6.5×7.5 inches, are perfect for short trips. The tubs offer ample ventilation and are straightforward to assemble, clean, and sterilize. They are made of durable plastic that can withstand any external impacts during transit.

5. Komodo Habitat Moss Box

The Komodo Habitat Moss Box may look like an unusual carrier option, but it has all the features necessary to make traveling with your leopard gecko comfortable and secure. The moss inside the box provides humidity control during the trip, preventing your pet from dehydration. The box is made of high-quality plastic that is resistant to heat and impact, and it comes in varying sizes, with the 20x12x14 cm being ideal for transport.

6. Exo Terra Faunarium

Exo Terra Faunarium is a versatile carrier that offers flexibility in housing other pets like tarantulas, chameleons, etc. It comes in compact sizes, with the medium size measuring 8x12x7 inches, making it easy to handle during travel. The faunariums are constructed with sturdy plastic that can withstand the rigors of travel. They have a locking mechanism to prevent accidental opening, and the lid provides excellent ventilation, reducing any concerns about suffocation.

7. Leew Pet Reptile Carrier

The Leew Pet Reptile Carrier is designed with portability in mind. It has a lightweight and compact design, with the collapsible feature making it easy to pack in a bag or store away after use. The carrier’s interior is made of breathable mesh fabric, promoting proper air circulation, and the exterior is constructed with durable waterproof material that makes it easy to clean. The Leew Pet Reptile Carrier is available in two sizes: small and medium.

8. Exo Terra Faunarium Large Flat Home

The Exo Terra Faunarium Large Flat Home offers ample space for your leopard gecko to move around during the journey. It is made of durable plastic that can withstand jostling and impact during transit. The carrier has two lockable openings that allow for proper ventilation and easy access. The flat bottom design makes it easy to pack away, and the carrier is dishwasher safe, ensuring hassle-free cleaning.

9. Lee’s All-Purpose Animal Carrier

The Lee’s All-Purpose Animal Carrier is a transparent plastic carrier designed to make transportation a breeze. It is built with durable plastic that can withstand any external damage during travel. The carrier has a locking mechanism to keep your leopard gecko safely contained, and the louvered vents at the top ensure ample air circulation. The Lee’s All-Purpose Animal Carrier is available in different sizes, and the small 9x6x5 inch option is ideal for short trips.

10. Zoo Med ReptiHabitat Leopard Gecko Kit

The Zoo Med ReptiHabitat Leopard Gecko Kit is a complete transport solution that comes with all the necessary components to make traveling with your leopard gecko comfortable and secure. It includes a glass terrarium, an under-tank heater, a digital thermometer, a hide, fake plants, and a care guide. The kit allows you to provide a complete and safe travel environment for your pet without taking up too much space. The Zoo Med ReptiHabitat Leopard Gecko Kit is available in different sizes, with the small size, measuring 10x20x12 inches, being the most suitable for transport.

With the varying options available in the market, choosing the right leopard gecko carrier can be overwhelming. However, this comprehensive review and buying guide have highlighted the top 10 carriers that provide a safe and comfortable travel experience for your pet. Remember, when selecting a carrier, always consider your leopard gecko’s size, the duration of the journey, and the convenience of packing and cleanup. With the right carrier, you can ensure that your leopard gecko travels safely and stress-free.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=05bp7q-OKjo

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Reptile Hero

How to Travel In a Car With Your Gecko? [6 Dos and 2 Don’ts]

Geckos are one of the easiest reptile pets to care for and are relatively low-maintenance – however, there are a few key things to keep in mind even if you’re only going to bring them along with you for a short trip to your exotic vet’s clinic. So how can pet parents properly and safely travel with their geckos in a car?

Regardless of the purpose and total time of travel, consider the following when traveling with geckos: 1) carrying container, 2) familiarity, 3) provisions, 4) temperature control, 5) covering, and 6) placement for security. It’s inadvisable to take your gecko on long trips with frequent stop-overs and loud music.

Come with me as I discuss all there is to know about car rides with geckos in greater detail!

Car Travel with Your Gecko: Start with the Basics

Let’s face it, life’s full of surprises and uncertainties. So as gecko keepers, we must always be ready to adjust and make changes in life as they come and go. In the same way, we should also know how to come and go while on trips with our lovely little reptile babies.

6 Things to Consider for a Car Ride with Your Gecko

You might go back home for an extended period or take a month-long vacation somewhere else. Ideally, you’d have someone else close to home that could take care of your baby for you.

Of course, you also need to need to move to a state miles away or regularly visit your local veterinary for a routine check-up. In all of the aforementioned situations, you will probably consider and need personally transporting your gecko while you travel by car.

I’ve briefly touched on this topic in a previous article on what to do with your geckos when you’re planning to go on vacation . But now, I’m going to give you the lowdown on traveling with your gecko!

car ride with gecko 6 things to consider

#1 – Carrying Container

In reality, transporting reptiles, geckos included, is actually an easy and straightforward task. You could safely go on a trip with them without having to worry much about adversely affecting their health aside from possibly stressing them too much on your journey. That is, as long as you keep them in a good carrying container.

There are plenty of options available in your local supermarket, pet store, online shop, and even at home! Good options for temporary carrying containers include all-purpose pet boxes ( here on Amazon), deli cups, plastic terrariums ( here on Amazon), plastic bins, stacking drawers, and even food storage boxes.

Gold tip: Make sure to poke a few holes on the sides or in the lid for proper ventilation . These should be small enough so your gecko can’t escape through them.

If there are no locks on the container, you could also tape the lid to two opposite sides so it doesn’t suddenly pop off. Then, line the bottom with a paper towel for easier cleaning and replacement of temporary substrate.

Geckos should be kept in a well-ventilated small plastic container to restrict their movement and prevent injuries. Such temporary housing must be devoid of clutter if possible that could potentially harm your gecko (e.g., rocks, branches). Additionally, the bottom should be lined with a paper towel instead of a loose substrate.

gecko travel cage

Some owners have also brought their geckos along for the ride in their original tanks. However, I personally wouldn’t do this nor recommend it to you because it’s too spacious and might crack in case of an abrupt stop. Seeing as the car will constantly be on the move, they might get thrown all over the place. Plus, vivariums usually have a lot of decor in them that could move around and hit – or even crush – your soft-bodied friend.

I mean, sure, you could put a few essential things in there like a makeshift hide from a few crumpled papers or an even smaller plastic box. Soft plants are okay too to make it homier. Other than those, they don’t really need anything else.

I’ve also heard from a friend that he once saw a gecko owner bring their gecko to the vet using a foldable cat carrier. The gecko seemed pretty chill about it but I don’t think I’d try doing that anywhere in the near future.

#2 – Familiarity

Reptiles, geckos especially, are known to need quite a bit of adjustment time before behaving as they normally should when placed in a different enclosure.

So even if you don’t have plans of moving or going on a trip anytime soon, I suggest you prepare a carrying container for your gecko well in advance.

Have them familiarize themselves with their temporary tanks to reduce the risk of stressing them out once you do have to take them on a car ride. Ideally, they should be given at least a week to try out their temporary homes.

Let your gecko spend a few minutes a day in its carrying container. You can start with 15 minutes. Increase time increments for each session until your gecko is okay with staying in there for an hour or so. This is not necessary, but will limit the stress your gecko will undergo in such a travel, especially if the journey is many hours long.

Other than that, let them go about their day as they normally would. Let them eat, sleep, drink, and explore in their original vivariums. Keep their routine relatively consistent.

Don’t leave them alone in a separate room when you do though and do make sure that they don’t get too hot or cold. They might start associating their temporary carriers with negative experiences if you do.

#3 – Provisions

You might think that you should pack food and water for your geckos if you’re going to bring them with you while you travel by car. That, however, isn’t actually the case. Geckos, and most other herps, don’t need water and food especially on trips that take less than a day to complete unless ambient temperatures reach 86°F (30°C) [1].

Most people advise against feeding geckos two days before traveling as well as feeding them while still on the road to prevent indigestion and regurgitation of food. It might sound cruel but it actually isn’t. Remember, geckos, much like every other lizard, can last a few days without being given food and water .

Still, I do understand that most, if not all, keepers would prefer to stay safe than sorry and bring along a bunch of provisions for their reptile companions. There’s water, food, additional paper towels, other cleaning supplies, and many other things.

For short car trips (less than 24 hours), geckos do not need water and food. For long car trips longer than 24 hours, water and food should be supplied to them.

I would advise against placing a water dish in their carrying container when traveling. Just bring a small spray bottle to mist them every so often, they can lick off the condensation if they need to. If it’s hot out and in the car, moisten the paper towel lining the bottom as well.

Also, if you’ll need to pack food for your gecko, you could opt for freeze-dried live feeders like this one on Amazon for less hassle and mess. You won’t have to deal with the nightmare of having live feeders hopping and crawling all over the car.

#4 – Temperature Control

As you probably know by now, geckos are very sensitive to changes in temperature since they are considered “ cold-blooded ” animals. Meaning, they rely heavily on their surroundings to regulate their body temperature.

Geckos don’t need heating and/or cooling materials while traveling by car unless the car temperatures are below 65°F (18°C) or above 90°F (32°C). Most often, a normal ambient temperature of about 75°F (24°C) in your car is safe for geckos.

You can’t exactly bring all their heating equipment in the car to make sure they’re comfortable. Since they’ll be confined in a much smaller space, doing so isn’t safe either. They could get thermal burns and dehydrate much quicker. So how do you heat and cool them up while traveling by car? Well, there are a few ways you could try out.

Use a shipping warmer pack ( here on Amazon), hot water bottle, or a warm bag of rice to help your gecko warm up while traveling in cold weather. Conversely, other solutions can be cold compress ( here on Amazon), an ice pack, a frozen rice packet, or a bag of frozen coconut oil to help your gecko cool down while traveling in hot weather.

Make sure none of the aforementioned materials come into direct contact with your gecko [1]. Wrap a few layers of paper or cloth around them first and then place them outside their carrying containers. Some people put it on top or below the containers. However, an acquaintance who worked for a large reptile shop says that doing so often causes death for animals being shipped.

It would be much better to position the heating or cooling element on a single side so that there is a temperature gradient within the small box. Don’t forget to monitor the temperature inside their temporary tank using a thermometer. Go the extra mile by placing their temporary tanks in an insulated shipping box, polystyrene foam cooler, insulated lunch bags, or with a simple thick towel.

#5 – Covering

Although there aren’t really many studies to explain and back up the theories behind it, several keepers and breeders have experienced seeing extremely stressed out geckos when they are kept in temporary carrying tanks that are all clear and see-through.

It’s highly possible that the ever-changing scenery, as well as the intense light entering the car, are enough to overwhelm and freak out your gecko.

To make sure your gecko doesn’t get upset by these, you can keep their tanks in another layer of insulation as I’ve previously mentioned.

You could also simply cover up all but one side of their tanks with dark tape or paper to make them feel much safer. By doing so, you can still check up on them even while you’re driving. Tote bags, pillowcases, and towels are great options as well.

Take it a step further by installing a few window shades inside your car. Better yet, have your windows tinted.

#6 – Placement for Security

From all the previous factors I’ve pointed out so far, it’s quite obvious that the placement of your gecko’s carrying tank is quite important.

Experts recommend placing temporary carrying containers either on the passenger seat or on the floor right in front of it. By doing so, you can readily check on your gecko.

It should preferably be kept away from places that received direct sun exposure like the dashboard. Placing it right in front of the air conditioning (AC) unit isn’t advisable either.

However, you shouldn’t keep it in the back because it will be harder to check on them in that way. They could be gaping from overheating and they might’ve even escaped without you noticing anything wrong.

Think about sudden breaks and speed bumps too – the shaking, tumbling, and all that. Even if you make sure to address all the 5 points I’ve listed, your gecko and its tank could get thrown all over the place if not tightly and securely restrained.

Use the seat belt, a rope, some harness, or a couple of bungee cords, to safely secure your gecko’s carrying tank in the car. Placing a pillow or thick towel below or around it can also provide additional cushioning.

2 Things to Avoid When Traveling with Your Gecko via Car

There are three major don’ts you should never do when traveling with your gecko. Although none of these will necessarily harm your geckos, it’s still best to give them a stress-free trip if you could. Remember, tail dropping is a common consequence of extreme distress.

#1 – Frequent Stop-overs

Though I have heard of rare cases where gecko owners have successfully transported their geckos, along with their many other pets, via car in as long as 3 days, it’s not something you’d hear frequently.

Even in those rare cases, they don’t drive straight continuously for days on end. Pet parents would usually check into pet-friendly hotels so they can rest. This gives them time to feed and check on their babies too.

Others recommend bringing bigger tanks for geckos to stay in at night but I think that would just exacerbate the stress they’re probably already experiencing. I mean, just imagine it – you’re kept in a dark box for hours but each time you’re taken out of your temporary home, your eyes are greeted by another strange and unfamiliar sight.

Why prolong the agony? The sooner your trip ends, the faster your gecko can get back to doing its normal routine. Stick to short trips with your gecko in tow, if you can’t don’t bring them with you.

#2 – Music on Full Blast

Who doesn’t want music blasting from the speakers during road trips and playing car karaoke? Well, your geckos might not be the biggest fan.

You could try and argue that the insulation you’ve wrapped your gecko’s temporary housing in would be enough all you want. But really think about it. If you have a neighbor that’s belting out his heart and soul while you’re trying to get some rest in bed, it can be pretty bothersome even when you try to block out the ruckus by covering your ears with a pillow.

Despite having ears that are less sensitive to sounds than humans, and most other mammals, geckos don’t do well with extremely loud sounds regardless if they’re abrupt or sustained.

Learn more about how geckos hear and their sound sensitivity by reading this article we’ve already published.

What to Expect After a Car Ride with Your Gecko

Understandably, your gecko may show mild signs of stress after taking a ride in your car for the first time. They may not eat anything or explore as much as they normally would for a day or two after arriving at a new place or getting back home.

Some owners say their little gecko dragons seem to take a liking to car travels after a couple of rides, however, others also say that their geckos never seem to get comfortable while traveling.

To make it easier for them to re-acclimate themselves, other pet parents said that slowly exposing them to their new environments has done wonders. They don’t wave their tails defensively or anything at all. Don’t be so quick to get them out. Instead, slowly take off the covers on their carrying tank before handling them.

Can Your Gecko Get Car Sick?

gecko travel cage

Newsflash – geckos can experience car sickness from traveling [2]. It hasn’t really been well-documented but there is some evidence for it.

At first, I thought that was just some sort of old wives’ tale within the reptile-keeping community. However, once I delved deeper into the topic, I found out that there was some truth to this claim.

Geckos, like humans and many other animals, may suffer from motion sickness. Signs include gasping, lethargy, and vomiting. In extreme cases, it could lead to death.

Because the information on this is scarce, I’m really not sure what causes this. I mean, they’re known to have sticky feet that allow them to basically defy gravity, right? Hopefully, in the future, more scientists will investigate this so we know how to prevent and treat it.

Taking all of that into consideration, I highly advise against frequently bringing your gecko round in a car for travel unless you actually need to.

If you need to travel by car anywhere with your gecko, give them a dedicated carrying container, let them familiarize themselves with it, bring necessary provisions with you, monitor and regulate for temperature, provide them some covering, and secure them in place.

Don’t go on long trips with frequent stop-overs and insanely loud music if your gecko is with you.

Geckos can experience motion sickness.

[1] https://environment.des.qld.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/90614/cp-wm-captive-reptile-amphibian-husbandry.pdf

[2] https://academic.oup.com/jtm/article/2/3/182/1853034

gecko travel cage

Andrea, the found of reptile hero, is a guy that by emerging his scientific background (in his past life earned a Ph.D.) and passion for his little reptile companions can put in one place science and his (and more) experience to help others in caring for their little friends.

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How to Travel With a Leopard Gecko 13 Helpful Tips

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How to Travel With a Leopard Gecko 13 Helpful Tips

When planning a weekend getaway or a big move across the country, as a pet owner, it’s crucial to consider your leopard gecko’s well-being. These little creatures are happiest when left alone in their cozy homes, thriving on minimal maintenance. However, life sometimes requires us to take our spotted friends on a journey, whether it’s a short trip to the vet or needing a ride for a longer duration. Typically, they can handle being away from their familiar environment for 2-3 days without any harm. As you prepare, remember that while it might be a small change for you, it’s a significant shift for your gecko.

Table of Contents

How to travel with a leopard gecko.

Travelling with your spotted friend, a leopard gecko, can be a smooth experience with the right approach. If you’re planning a trip for a few days or longer, beyond a usual weekend vacation, it’s vital to ensure your gecko can survive and thrive. When relocating far away or if it’s impractical to leave them behind, consider asking a friend or a pet sitter to come by and check on your reptile child. They will need to provide water, clean the waste from the tank, and ensure proper feeding.

Leopard geckos can generally survive without food for up to two weeks, but we recommend not going more than three days without feeding. They need water every 24 hours to stay hydrated. If human friends or sitters can’t be found and you must bring your gecko along, know that while they prefer to stay at home, they can tolerate a short trip of less than three travel days. Always take necessary precautions to ensure a safe and stress-free drive for your gecko.

How To Transport A Leopard Gecko

Leopard geckos are not particularly fond of changes in their environment, and moving them can be quite stressful. The best alternative is often to avoid travelling with your gecko, but sometimes, taking your little buddy along is unavoidable. Thankfully, there are different ways to transport your gecko successfully. Whether you choose to travel by plane, car, or train, the requirements for a safe and comfortable experience remain consistent. It involves thorough research and meticulous planning, ensuring that every aspect of the journey, from the mode of transportation to the travel carrier, aligns with the needs of your gecko. By addressing these factors, you can make the journey less daunting for both you and your pet.

Step 1: Choose A Travel Carrier

The first and most important step in travelling with your leopard gecko is selecting a sturdy and secure travel carrier with proper ventilation. While you might choose to modify your gecko’s regular enclosure, it’s crucial to make changes to make it safer for travel. This includes removing loose substrate to prevent it from sliding and potentially smothering your Leo, or causing them to accidentally inhale or ingest it.

Objects and décor pieces that could move or fall over should also be taken out to prevent accidents and injuries. If possible, securely attach a heavy hide for your gecko to retreat into if they feel stressed. Alternatively, you can opt for a small container, such as a large Tupperware, which you can purchase online for transporting small pets. Ideally, the space should be adequate for your gecko to move and stretch without too much room to tumble during a sharp turn or if you hit a bump. It’s important to ensure there are enough ventilation holes for air, but not so big that your lizard could escape.

Step 2: Familiarize Your Gecko With Their Travel Carrier

When using a newly purchased travel carrier or a container that your gecko is not yet familiar with, it’s crucial to allow them time to become familiar with the space they’ll be travelling in. This can be achieved by gradually introducing them to it over a few days before your adventure. Start by placing your gecko inside the carrier for short periods, like just a few minutes, and then increase this time to around 30 minutes. This approach helps make your gecko comfortable with their new travel setup, significantly minimizing their stress levels throughout the journey.

Step 3: Line The Bottom

To stabilize your gecko and prevent them from sliding around during travel, it’s a good idea to line the bottom of their container with a material that provides a firm grip. A great option is a non-toxic shelf liner, known for its effectiveness. Alternatively, paper towels can be used, as they offer a textured surface suitable for your gecko’s little feet. This simple step can make a significant difference in ensuring your gecko’s comfort and safety on the move.

Step 4: Monitor Temps

When it comes to managing the temperature during your trip, especially considering the weather and distance, you need to take specific measures to control it, ensuring it doesn’t fall below 65 degrees or rise above 90 degrees Fahrenheit. In hot weather, keep the space cool by running the air conditioning in your car, but avoid placing the carrier directly under the vent to prevent your gecko from getting too cold.

Conversely, when it’s cold outside, maintain a comfortable environment in your car by using the heat. As an additional tip, you can use a heating source like a heating pack or hand warmers to provide warmth. Wrapping the carrier in a towel or blanket can create an insulated and cozy space. This not only keeps your gecko warm but also shields them from flashing lights and outside stimuli that could potentially bother them, helping to keep their stress levels low.

Step 5: Pack All Of The Essentials

When getting ready for transport with your leopard gecko, it’s a good idea to gather all the necessary items to ensure its well-being. Whether it’s shorter trips or longer journeys, being prepared for unexpected situations starts with a thorough checklist. Food and water are paramount; pack their regular food along with supplements and a dish for easy feeding.

Heating sources are crucial for maintaining ideal travel conditions; include heating pads or hand warmers to keep them warm. A thermometer is essential to monitor the temperature inside the travel carrier, ensuring a comfortable range for your pet. Blankets or towels create a cozy, safe environment inside the carrier, with additional covering to minimize stimulus for your Leo.

Don’t forget cleaning supplies like paper towels to maintain cleanliness. In case of emergency, having contact information for a reptile veterinarian is vital, ensuring you’re covered for any emergencies or concerns. If you’re staying overnight, overnight equipment such as a UVB source, basking lamp, and a hideout ensure a comfortable overnight setup. For powering these, a USB port or cigarette lighter adapter can be handy in your car. Remember, having these essential items for your trek keeps your gecko happy and healthy. It’s better to be over-prepared than under-prepared for any situation.

Step 6: Secure Their Carrier

unit or cage effectively. It should be strapped firmly to a seat or contained in a way that prevents movement. A great place for this is on the passenger floor, as it reduces the risk of the carrier being knocked off the chair if you have to slam on the brakes suddenly.

Additionally, having the carrier on the passenger floor allows you to check on your gecko often during the travel, ensuring they are safe and not overly stressed. Properly securing their carrier is crucial for their safety and your peace of mind while on the road.

Step 7: Consider Their Ears

When travelling with your gecko, it’s essential to prevent exposure to unnecessary noise and stimuli that could stress them. Blasting loud music or driving with the windows down can create an unsettling environment for them. Instead, maintain a calm and peaceful environment by listening to tunes at a reasonable volume and keeping the windows rolled up.

You can also cover the carrier with a blanket or towel to block out flashing lights and distractions that could bother your gecko. This approach, as mentioned above, will significantly reduce their stress and create a more comfortable journey for your scaly companion.

Step 8: Minimize Stops

When you’re able to, it’s best to keep the number of stops to a minimum while travelling with your leopard gecko. The sooner you reach your destination, the quicker your gecko can return to their usual habitat, where they are happier.

Plan your trip to ensure a smooth journey with as few interruptions as possible. This careful planning helps in reducing the stress on your gecko and ensures they remain comfortable throughout the travel. A well-thought-out route with minimal stops not only benefits your gecko but also makes the journey more relaxing for you. Remember, a happy gecko makes for a peaceful trip, so thank yourself for the extra effort in planning!

Step 9: Stick to the Road

When travelling with a leopard gecko, adopting a ‘less is more’ approach can be better, especially regarding stops. Ideally, you should aim to reach your location within 24 hours or less to minimize disruptions. It’s important to withhold food for a couple of days before the trip to help your gecko feel better during the ride.

If your trip lasts longer than a day, you must spritz them with water to keep them hydrated, and if it extends beyond three days, you’ll need to provide food. Reducing the number of stops not only streamlines your journey but also helps in maintaining a stable environment for your gecko, ensuring their comfort and reducing stress.

Step 10: Monitor Your Leo

How to Travel With a Leopard Gecko

When on the road, don’t forget to check in on your Leo from time to time. It’s essential to keep a close eye out for any unusual behaviour that might indicate they are feeling uncomfortable or stressed.

The longer the journey, the more attention your gecko needs. Make sure they are still doing ok throughout the trip. This means observing them for signs of distress or discomfort and adjusting the environment as needed. Your vigilance is key to ensuring their well-being, especially when they’re out of their usual habitat and relying on you for their safety and comfort.

Step 11: Limit Their Exposure to Stressful Stimuli

When travelling with your leopard gecko, especially if it’s for more than 24 hours, consider how each aspect of the journey may impact their stress levels. Some gecko parents opt to return their lizard to its enclosure for the night during a stop at a hotel, but this can cause more stress as you pack up and leave the next morning.

Leopard geckos often dislike being in clear containers where they can see changing environments. A simple fix to this problem is covering their temporary shuttle with a loose-fitting towel or placing them in an insulating container like a cooler. These measures can significantly reduce their exposure to stressful stimuli, making the journey more comfortable for them.

Step 12: Introduce Them to Their New Environment Slowly

When you arrive at your travel destination, it’s important to introduce your leopard gecko to their new surroundings slowly and with patience. Instead of letting them out immediately, give them some time to see and acclimate to the new place from the safety of their carrier. Once they seem less timid, allow them to climb out and explore at their own pace.

Being patient and not forcing or rushing this process can help your gecko feel at ease in an unfamiliar environment. This gentle introduction can significantly reduce their stress and make the transition smoother for your scaly friend.

Step 13: Return Your Gecko To Their Habitat Quickly Upon Arrival

Upon arrival at your destination, make it a priority to return your leopard gecko to their familiar habitat as soon as possible. This helps them settle back into their normal routine with ease. After the transition, keep a close eye on your Leo, watching for any signs of stress or illness in the days that follow.

Be vigilant for any dramatic change in their behaviour, appetite, appearance, or abnormal urate and faeces . If you notice anything wrong within a few days, it would be wise to reach out to the nearest reptile veterinarian for advice. Prompt attention to their post-travel behaviour is crucial to ensure their health and well-being.

Can You Bring A Leopard Gecko On A Plane?

How to Travel With a Leopard Gecko

Unfortunately, when it comes to travelling by air, bringing your leopard gecko on a plane is often not an option, as most airlines prohibit reptiles in the cabin. However, some lizard-friendly carriers do allow nonvenomous reptiles to be shipped as cargo under specific guidelines.

This means your Good pet gecko might still be able to fly in the belly of the plane if you coordinate their transport according to airline cargo safety requirements, which are similar to those for car travel. The International Air Transport Association (IATA) has set rules to ensure pets have a comfortable and safe journey during flight, which include guidelines on food, water, carrier size, and temperature requirements.

If considering this option, be aware that if the airline believes your pet could be at risk, they won’t allow them to fly. Each airline has different rules based on routes, aircraft type, and the number of pets allowed in their cargo space. Airlines like American Airlines, Air Canada, Aegean Air, Air Europa, Alaska Air, Finnair (which uses a third party), and WestJet are known to facilitate such travel.

It’s always a good idea to call and check the rules before attempting to fly with your Leo. Additional information about each airline’s rules and regulations for transporting pets in cargo can usually be found through the links provided on their websites.

Can You Bring A Leopard Gecko On A Train?

Much like airlines, many train companies also don’t allow live reptiles to travel onboard with their owners. However, due to the different train services available in various parts of the world, there might be exceptions. If you’re considering taking your leopard gecko on a train, it’s advisable to contact your local train company well in advance of your trip.

Make sure to inquire about their specific policies regarding travelling with pets. Each company may have its own rules and regulations, so understanding these beforehand is crucial for a hassle-free journey with your gecko.

How to SAFELY Travel with Pet Lizards in a Car

Traveling with a lizard in a car can seem like a daunting task filled with many questions about how to transport them properly. To ensure your gecko stays warm and secure, you’ll need to pack the right equipment. With proper preparation, the process becomes surprisingly straightforward.

Whether it’s a quick trip to the vet or a longer journey due to moving house, good planning is key. Some useful tips include using a suitable carrier, maintaining the right temperature, and ensuring minimal disturbance. By following these guidance steps, you can ensure that your lizard arrives at the destination both safe and sound.

How do I travel with a leopard gecko?

When travelling with a leopard gecko, it’s crucial to start by researching the best travel method and planning ahead. Ensure your gecko becomes familiar with their travel carrier, pay close attention to their well-being upon arrival, and pack all essentials like food, water, and heat sources to keep them safe and secure.

Can you take a leopard gecko on a road trip?

Your gecko will be fine on a road trip, even if exact temperature requirements are not met temporarily. While running air conditioning in the car is not always appreciated, many people transport their geckos when going away for summer or during long college vacations.

Can you fly with a leopard gecko?

While most airlines do not accept reptiles in the cabin or as checked baggage, it’s possible to ship your reptile as air cargo in a proper container, provided you use a compliant carrier. Be aware, each airline has different rules, so this should not pose a problem if guidelines are followed..

How do you move a leopard gecko?

To move a leopard gecko, buy a reptile-carrying container that’s big enough for them to move around but not so large that they get thrown asportation. Ensure the container is unbreakable and has small air holes for ventilation.

Conclusion 

Travelling with a leopard gecko is not ideal, but sometimes necessary. Your reptilian buddy will require being outfitted with appropriate travel accommodations. A smaller carrier, secured on the cooler floor of the car to ensure it doesn’t tip over, can put your lizard at ease. It’s crucial to limit stressors like external stimuli and extreme temperatures, especially colder than 65ºF. This preparation helps in reducing their discomfort and anxiety during the journey.

While driving, ensure it’s a safely navigated ride for your gecko. Upon arriving at your destination, it’s best to make as few unnecessary stops as possible. Hold off on offering food and water until you are situated at your destination to prevent car sickness and accidents. By following these steps, both you and your leopard gecko can enjoy the ride with minimal stress.

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Are you a jubilant owner of a leopard gecko? Do you want to ensure your pet is living in a happy and healthy environment? 

One of the most important things you can do for your pet’s well-being is to provide them with an appropriate cage setup. 

In this blog, we will explain why leopard gecko cage setup is crucial for their happiness and how to create the perfect habitat for them.

From choosing the right substrate, lighting, temperature, decor, and accessories, we will cover everything you need to know about keeping your beloved pet comfortable and engaged.

We will also discuss common issues that may arise during the setup process and provide troubleshooting tips. So, if you want to ensure that your leopard gecko lives its best life possible, read on!

What size tank does a leopard gecko need? Leopard Geckos, cherished for their unique charm, thrive in a spacious and enriching environment. A tank size of at least 10 gallons provides ample room for exploration, promoting physical and mental health. This ensures these captivating creatures can exhibit natural behaviors, fostering a fulfilling and contented life.

Leopard Gecko Tank Setup Ideas: Set Up A Leopard Gecko Humidity

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Proper leopard gecko habitat is important for the physical and mental health of these reptiles. A well-structured environment reduces stress, encourages natural behaviors, and promotes their ability to thermoregulate.

Mimicking their natural habitat in their enclosure setup is key to promoting instincts, feeding, and breeding behaviors.

Besides, creating an environment that aids in their overall welfare helps leopard gecko owners ensure the happiness of their pets.

Considering the best way to set up the cage without sharp edges and providing suitable substrate options are important factors.

Understanding the impact of direct sunlight and maintaining optimal temperature levels in the enclosure are also essential for creating a healthy environment for these lizards.

Creating an ideal leopard gecko tank setup involves several key elements. It’s important to establish a warm side, and a cool side, and ensure adequate substrate depth for the gecko’s comfort and natural behavior.

Including live plants, natural hides, and basking spots enriches the tank environment and promotes the gecko’s well-being. Proper lighting, temperature gradient, and humidity levels are vital components of the tank setup to mimic the gecko’s natural habitat.

Using substrates that encourage natural behaviors and minimize health issues is essential for the gecko’s optimal health.

Ultimately, a well-equipped tank setup offers leopard geckos a safe and comfortable environment, leading to better overall health outcomes.

Enhancing the leopard gecko habitat involves incorporating various tank accessories such as water dishes, moist hides, and artificial plants.

It’s crucial for leopard gecko owners to provide appropriate water bowls, heating sources, and lighting accessories, ensuring a safe and stimulating environment.

Smooth-edged accessories are essential to prevent health issues, and heating mats, heat lamps, and UVB bulb lighting contribute to the overall welfare of the geckos.

Suitable tank accessories promote natural behaviors and grooming, mimicking their natural habitat and creating a comfortable living space.

Preparing a bioactive reptile enclosure involves establishing a self-sustaining habitat that supports a natural ecosystem.

This setup utilizes live plants, clean-up crews, and natural substrate to foster a healthy, low-maintenance environment for leopard gecko owners.

The bioactive elements provide mental stimulation for the geckos, promoting natural behaviors and activity while reducing stress and supporting natural feeding.

These enclosures offer geckos a more enriched environment, contributing to their overall well-being. It’s a great way to ensure that leopard gecko habitat is engaging and promotes their health.

Leopard geckos require essential elements for their cage, including a moist hide, fresh water source, and proper heating.

Natural hiding spots, a substrate for burrowing, and climbing structures are also crucial.

Providing varied temperature gradients, appropriate lighting, humidity levels, and feeding areas contribute to their wellness. A well-equipped and enriched cage allows geckos to thrive.

Selecting The Best Substrate For The Cage

When considering the best substrate for your leopard gecko’s cage, it’s essential to prioritize their health.

Preventing impaction and digestive issues is crucial, which makes choosing a quality substrate paramount.

By replicating their natural environment, substrates like reptile carpet, moss, or wood chippings can promote natural behaviors and reduce stress for your gecko.

Selecting the best substrate ensures your gecko can maintain proper hygiene and health within their enclosure, supporting their natural habitat and behaviors.

As leopard gecko owners, creating the right environment with suitable substrates is the first thing to address for their overall good health.

When considering the enclosure size for leopard geckos, it’s important to provide ample space for them to move, climb, and explore.

A spacious enclosure allows geckos to exhibit natural behaviors, reducing stress and health issues while promoting their physical and mental well-being.

The dimensions of the enclosure directly impact geckos’ activity levels, feeding behaviors, and overall health, contributing to their comfort, natural habitat representation, and overall well-being.

Ensuring the right tank size is essential for leopard gecko owners to create an environment where their pets can thrive. 

Setting up the habitat for leopard geckos, and selecting suitable substrate options is crucial for their wellness and comfort. Options like reptile carpet, slate, or natural moss enhance the geckos’ environment and enable natural digging, burrowing, and thermoregulation, replicating their natural habitat.

These substrates also promote hygienic conditions and support the geckos’ overall health. Opting for safe, moisture-retaining substrates from pet stores or regular shops further contributes to the geckos’ health and natural behaviors.

Choosing appropriate substrate options is a great way to ensure the comfort, hygiene, and well-being of leopard gecko owners’ pets and enhance their overall habitat.

Gecko owners benefit from incorporating adequate hiding spots, both moist and dry, to create a sense of security and comfort within the leopard gecko’s enclosure.

Well-placed hiding spots promote natural behaviors and reduce stress levels, contributing to the overall health of the geckos.

The inclusion of hiding spots is particularly crucial for leopard geckos, considering their unique tail anatomy.

These hiding spots also provide options for thermoregulation, supporting the geckos’ physical well-being.

Properly positioned hiding spots not only enhance the enclosure setup but also play a crucial role in fostering natural behaviors and the overall health of leopard geckos.

Creating The Ideal Lighting And Temperature Conditions

Leopard geckos, with their special anatomy that helps them blend in, do well when they have the right light and temperature setup.

Proper lighting is vital for the natural habitat simulation of leopard geckos. Maintaining optimal temperature levels is crucial for their health, requiring a balance of heat and cool areas in their enclosure.

Leopard geckos benefit from a temperature gradient, allowing them to regulate body temperature effectively.

Also, UVB lighting supports calcium metabolism and prevents health issues, essential for the well-being of leopard gecko owners.

When making the ideal lighting and temperature conditions, it’s important to consider the best way to provide these elements within the leopard gecko’s habitat, ensuring they are safe and free from sharp edges or direct sunlight.

Leopard geckos benefit from access to a natural day-night cycle, which is essential for their well-being. UVB lighting supports calcium metabolism, preventing health issues. 

A basking spot with moderate heat aids warmth and digestion, while a dimmable, natural daylight lamp supports their natural rhythm.

It’s crucial to provide lighting that does not emit heat, as it supports their health and well-being. Owners should ensure the lighting mimics their natural habitat, promoting the best way for geckos to thrive in their leopard gecko habitat.

To ensure the good health of your leopard gecko, it’s crucial to create a habitat with a warm side and a cool side, allowing them to regulate their body temperature effectively.

Adding a heat mat or heat lamp will help maintain the necessary temperature gradient in the enclosure.

Monitor the temperature levels daily with a thermometer to ensure that your leopard gecko’s habitat remains within the optimal range. 

Providing a temperature gradient is essential for your pet to thermoregulate effectively. Aim for a warm side temperature between 88-90°F and a cool side around 70-75°F to create the perfect environment for your leopard gecko’s enclosure.

In creating a comfortable leopard gecko habitat, heating devices like heat mats or heat lamps are essential for providing the necessary warmth.

Likewise, cooling devices such as ceramic heat emitters help maintain consistent temperature levels within the enclosure, promoting the overall well-being of leopard geckos.

It’s important to ensure proper insulation around heating devices to prevent direct contact and potential harm to the geckos.

Establishing a thermal gradient within the enclosure is crucial, as it allows leopard geckos to regulate their body temperature effectively.

Typically monitoring of temperature levels is also important to ensure the comfort and health of leopard geckos in their enclosure.

Selecting Decor And Accessories For Enrichment

When setting up a leopard gecko’s enclosure, it’s important to include stimulating decorative elements.

Artificial plants can provide hiding spots and enrichment for leopard geckos while incorporating live plants can promote their natural behavior and health.

In addition, essential accessories such as a water dish, moist hide, and dry hide are crucial for their well-being.

Creating an engaging habitat with safe decorative elements and accessories is the best way to ensure your leopard gecko thrives in its environment. As responsible leopard gecko owners, it’s our duty to ensure that the habitat is comfortable, safe, and enriching for our pets.

Incorporating safe and stimulating decorative elements is essential for their well-being while creating a leopard gecko’s enclosure.

Natural-looking decor with rounded edges should be used to prevent injury and ensure the safety of the geckos.

Adding naturalistic backgrounds can enhance the visual appeal and provide stimulation for the geckos.

To mimic their natural habitat, non-toxic, artificial plants should be included in the enclosure. Geckos also enjoy exploring and climbing on safe, natural wood and rock decor, which promotes their physical and mental well-being.

By providing secure and stimulating decor, leopard gecko owners can ensure an enriching environment for their pets.

When setting up a leopard gecko’s enclosure, it’s crucial for leopard gecko owners to consider the best way to create a stimulating environment for their pets.

An easy way to achieve this is by using substrates like reptile carpet, moss, or slate to provide engaging surfaces for geckos.

Terrarium accessories such as ledges, branches, and hides not only offer hideouts but also climbing opportunities for these lizards.

Including natural, live plants in the enclosure is a great way to enrich the leopard gecko habitat. It’s important to include water dishes, moist hides, and dry hides on a regular basis to support the geckos’ health and behavior.

Leopard gecko owners can ensure a comfortable and engaging habitat by considering the best way to set up a leopard gecko’s enclosure.

It’s important to avoid sharp edges and select the right gallon tank and screen lid. Providing a variety of substrates like loose substrates and incorporating natural elements is a great way to promote exploration and mental stimulation.

Besides, creating a balanced habitat that does not expose the geckos to direct sunlight and monitoring the enclosure regularly is key.

This easy way helps in mimicking the gecko’s natural habitat while also ensuring their safety and well-being.

Regularly tending to your leopard gecko’s enclosure is pivotal for their well-being. Daily spot-cleaning to remove waste and soiled substrate maintains a hygienic habitat, safeguarding your pet’s health.

For reptile-safe cleaning products to ensure a safe and sanitized environment. Additionally, regularly refreshing the substrate fosters a clean and healthy setup, preventing potential health issues.

By upholding a stringent cleaning routine, you are actively promoting a flourishing and comfortable environment for your leopard gecko.

Leopard geckos thrive in environments that mimic their natural habitat. Understanding their behavior and needs is crucial for leopard gecko owners.

Providing a moist hide supports proper shedding and hydration, while a warm, sandy substrate replicates their natural environment.

It’s essential to be aware of their feeding, temperature, and humidity requirements for a healthy enclosure.

Creating an enriching environment with natural elements promotes their well-being. Meeting these specific needs is the best way to ensure the happiness of pet geckos.

Understanding the right humidity levels for your gecko’s enclosure is crucial. A temperature gradient in the terrarium is essential for your gecko’s health, and providing a moist hide is necessary to maintain proper moisture levels .

Regularly monitoring calcium levels is important for your gecko’s bone health, and offering a variety of substrates can help prevent impaction issues in your gecko.

This ensures a healthy and comfortable leopard gecko habitat, replicating their natural environment.

By incorporating these measures, leopard gecko owners can create an optimal living space for their pets, promoting their well-being and longevity.

Observing the feeding habits of your leopard gecko can offer valuable insights into its overall health and well-being.

Noting its body temperature and basking behavior allows for adjustments to heating settings, ensuring a comfortable habitat.

Regularly monitoring moisture levels within the gecko’s enclosure is crucial to maintaining its health.

Paying attention to your gecko’s activity throughout the day provides essential information for making setup adjustments.

Observing shedding patterns can indicate the effectiveness of the enclosure setup, guiding necessary modifications.

Implementing these observations is the best way to ensure the habitat meets the specific needs of your leopard gecko.

When enhancing your leopard gecko’s enclosure, consider incorporating live plants to create a more natural environment.

UVB lighting helps maintain calcium levels and overall health, while a bioactive gecko enclosure offers a natural habitat.

Natural substrates like moss or slate contribute to your gecko’s comfort. Implementing a temperature gradient with heat mats and lamps mimics sandy deserts, resembling the gecko’s natural habitat.

These advanced tips elevate your leopard gecko’s habitat, ensuring a stimulating and healthy environment.

Leopard gecko owners can create the best habitat by following these guidelines and understanding the importance of a well-designed enclosure.

Leopard geckos require a spacious cage for movement and exploration. To maintain the ideal temperature of 88-92°F, a heat source like an under-tank heater or heat lamp is necessary. Providing humid hide boxes for security and moist hides for shedding is essential. Substrate options include reptile carpet, paper towels, or tile.

How Should A Leopard Gecko Tank Be Set Up?

To set up a leopard gecko tank, ensure it’s at least 20 gallons in size and has a heat source like an under-tank heater or heat lamp. Provide a hide box for privacy and use safe and easy-to-clean substrates such as reptile carpets or paper towels.

Do Leopard Geckos Like Big Cages?

Leopard Geckos thrive in big cages that allow them to move, explore, and hide. The recommended minimum is 10 gallons per gecko, but bigger cages offer more space for activity and reduce stress. A spacious setup with ample hiding spots promotes a healthy and happy gecko.

Do Leopard Geckos Need 3 Hides?

Leopard Geckos benefit from having at least two hides – one for warmth and one for coolness. Adding a third hide in the middle of the enclosure, providing a humid retreat, can enhance their mental and physical well-being. Multiple hides reduce stress and increase activity levels.

What Kind Of Habitat Is Perfect For A Leopard Gecko?

A vivarium with a warm basking area, a cooler side, and hiding spots is the perfect habitat for leopard geckos, as they are nocturnal and need a comfortable environment to thrive.

Providing a suitable habitat for your leopard gecko is crucial for its overall well-being.

Regularly assessing and adjusting the enclosure setup ensures your gecko’s health and happiness.

Understanding the specific needs of leopard geckos is key to creating an ideal habitat.

Enhancing the leopard gecko cage setup contributes to its physical and mental stimulation.

Proper monitoring and care of the gecko’s environment are essential for its longevity and quality of life.

By prioritizing these aspects, leopard gecko owners can create the best possible habitat for their pets, promoting a healthy and fulfilling life for their beloved lizards.

About the author

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My name is Neamul A. Shumon. For over a decade, I’ve been passionately writing about nature and the intriguing world of cold-blooded reptiles. My deep love for nature and fascination with wild animals have driven me to embark on this writing journey.Exploring the wonders of nature has always been a part of who I am. for any quarry you can send an email [email protected] and to know more about me Click Here

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How To Travel With A Leopard Gecko: Everything You Need To Know

How To Travel With A Leopard Gecko

If you have a leopard gecko as a pet, you probably know that they’re typically happiest when left alone in their cozy little homes.

They require such minimal maintenance that they can even handle being left alone for a few days at a time. If you’re planning to go away for a weekend, 2-3 days to itself won’t do your leopard gecko any harm.

But, life happens, and sometimes you’ve got to take your little spotted friend with you, whether it’s simply a visit to the vet or a big move across the country. So, if you find yourself needing to take your leopard gecko along for a ride, you might ask:

How do I travel with a leopard gecko?

Traveling with a leopard gecko involves researching your travel method and planning ahead, allowing your gecko to become familiar with their travel carrier, and paying close attention to their well-being during and after arrival. You’ll want to make sure their travel carrier is safe and secure, and pack essentials like food, water, and heat sources.

In this article, we’ll explore all there is to know about how to travel with a leopard gecko, covering the main modes of transportation. Let’s get started!

How To Transport A Leopard Gecko

Leopard geckos aren’t fond of changes to their environment, and the process of moving them around can be quite stressful for them. Unless there’s no other alternative, it’s best to avoid traveling with your gecko.

However, sometimes traveling with your little buddy is unavoidable, so thankfully, there are a few different ways you can take them along with you.

No matter how you choose to travel – by plane, car, or train – the requirements for taking your leopard gecko along remain the same. It’s all about research, planning, and ensuring that your gecko has a safe and comfortable travel experience.

Here are some things you can do to help transport your leopard gecko successfully:

Step 1: Choose A Travel Carrier

The first and most important thing you’ll need is a sturdy and secure travel carrier that allows for proper ventilation.

Should you choose to use your gecko’s regular enclosure, you’ll want to make a few changes to it first to make it safer for travel.

Remove any loose substrate so it doesn’t slide around and smother your Leo, causing them to accidentally inhale or ingest any of it.

Also, be sure to take out any objects (décor pieces) inside that could move around or fall over. This will help to prevent any accidents or injuries to your gecko while you’re on the move.

However, if you’re able to securely attach a hide, or have a hide that is heavy enough that it will not fall over, it’s good to leave one of those in there for your leo to hide in if they feel stressed.

Alternatively, you can opt for a small travel carrier or container, like the ones you can purchase online for transporting small pets, or even use a large Tupperware container.

Ideally, you want a space small enough that they can move and stretch out a bit but not have enough space that they can tumble around if you make a sharp turn or hit a bump.

It’s also important to make sure that there are enough ventilation holes in the container for your gecko to get air, but you don’t want them to be big enough for your lizard to escape.

For a visual idea of how to pack up and move a leopard gecko, check out this video of someone moving 3 leopard geckos and a crested gecko to their new home!

Step 2: Familiarize Your Gecko With Their Travel Carrier

If using a newly purchased travel carrier or a container your gecko isn’t familiar with, allow them some time to become familiar with the space they’ll be traveling in. You can do this by gradually introducing them to it in the days before your adventure.

Start by placing your gecko inside the carrier for short periods, like a few minutes at a time. As the days go by, gradually increase the time to about 30 minutes or so.

This approach will help your leopard gecko become more comfortable in their new travel setup, minimizing their stress levels during the journey ahead.

Step 3: Secure The Carrier

If traveling by car, you’ll want to make sure you can secure the carrier in your vehicle so it doesn’t move or slide around. If you’re able to, buckle it in using one of your seatbelts.

It’s also a good idea to make sure there are no items above or around the carrier that could fall into or on top of it causing damage to your gecko or its carrier.

Step 4: Line The Bottom

To help stabilize your gecko itself and keep them from sliding around, it’s a good idea to line the bottom of the container with something that provides a good grip.

One option is using a non-toxic shelf liner, which works really well. Another option is to use paper towels or something else that has a textured surface for your gecko’s little feet.

Step 5: Monitor Temps

Depending on the weather and the distance of your trip, you might need to take some measures to control the temperature. It’s important to avoid extreme temperatures below 65 degrees or above 90 degrees Fahrenheit.

If it’s hot outside, you can keep your space cool by running the air conditioning. Make sure not to place the carrier directly under the air conditioning vent, though, because this could quickly cause your gecko to become too cold.

If it’s cold outside, you can keep the temperature comfortable in your car by turning on the heat.

Also, you can use a heating source like a heating pack or hand warmers to provide warmth for your gecko’s carrier, or you can place a towel or blanket over the carrier to keep it insulated and cozy. (Additional tip: this is also a great way to keep flashing lights or outside stimuli from bothering your gecko, helping to keep their stress levels low.)

Step 6: Pack All Of The Essentials

When getting ready to transport your leopard gecko, it’s a good idea to gather all of the necessary items you might need to ensure their well-being along the way.

For shorter trips, you can stick to the basics, but for longer journeys, it’s wise to be prepared for any unexpected situations. Here’s a checklist of what you should bring:

Food and water – Make sure to pack enough of your gecko’s regular food , any needed supplements, and a small dish for water.

Heating sources – Depending on the weather and travel conditions, you might need to pack heating sources such as heating pads or hand warmers to keep your gecko warm.

Thermometer – This will help you to monitor the temperature inside your leopard gecko’s travel carrier and ensure it stays within a comfortable range for your gecko.

Blankets and towels – These items will come in handy when creating a cozy and safe environment for your leo (if you’re covering their carrier to minimize stimulus, keeping them warm, etc.)

Cleaning supplies – It’s always a good idea to have some cleaning supplies and paper towels on hand to maintain cleanliness in your leopard gecko’s travel carrier.

Emergency vet contact – Have the contact information for an emergency reptile veterinarian on hand in case of emergencies or if you have any concerns along the way.

Overnight equipment – If you’ll be staying somewhere overnight, you’ll want to bring additional equipment like a UVB source , a basking lamp, and a hideout to provide a comfortable overnight setup for your gecko.

You may even want to consider using a USB port or cigarette lighter with an adapter to power any necessary electronics while in your car.

By packing these essential items, you’ll be well-prepared for a long trek to keep your leopard gecko as happy and healthy as possible. It’s always better to be over-prepared than under-prepared when it comes to situations like this.

Step 7: Be Mindful Of Stimulus

Think about how certain things like blasting loud music or having the windows down can create unnecessary noise and stimuli that might stress your gecko out even more.

To prevent this, try to keep a calm and peaceful environment by listening to tunes at a reasonable volume and having the windows rolled up.

You can also cover your gecko’s carrier with a blanket or towel to block out flashing lights and any other distractions that could bother your gecko (as mentioned above).

Step 8: Minimize Stops

If you’re able to, it’s best to keep stops to a minimum. The sooner you can reach your destination and get your gecko back into its usual habitat, the happier it will be.

So, try to plan your trip in a way that allows for a smooth journey with as few interruptions as possible. Your gecko will thank you for it!

Step 9: Monitor Your Leo

Don’t forget to check in on your leo from time to time. Keep an eye out for any unusual behavior that might indicate they’re feeling uncomfortable or stressed.

The longer the journey, the more attention you should give to your gecko to make sure they’re still doing ok.

Step 10: Return Your Gecko To Their Habitat Quickly Upon Arrival

Once you arrive at your destination, make it a priority to return your leopard gecko to its familiar habitat as soon as possible. This will help them to settle back into their normal routine and feel more at ease.

Keep a close eye on your leo and watch for any signs of stress or illness in the days that follow. This could look like a dramatic change in behavior, appetite, appearance, or even abnormal urate and feces .

If you notice that something seems to be wrong with your leopard gecko after a few days of arriving, it would be wise to reach out to your nearest reptile veterinarian.

Can You Bring A Leopard Gecko On A Plane?

Unfortunately, when it comes to traveling by air, bringing your leopard gecko on the plane alongside you is not an option as all airlines prohibit reptiles from traveling in the cabin.

However, there are some “lizard-friendly” airlines that do allow nonvenomous reptiles to be shipped as cargo, as long as they meet specific guidelines. This means your pet gecko might be able to fly with you in the belly of the plane if you coordinate your travel that way.

When transporting your leopard gecko via airline cargo, many of the safety requirements are the same as they would be if traveling by car.

In fact, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) has put together a set of rules for all airlines that ensures pets have a comfortable and safe journey on any flight. These guidelines address important aspects like food and water, carrier size, temperature requirements, and more.

Ultimately, if the airline believes your pet could be at risk, they won’t allow them to fly.

It’s also important to note that different airlines have different rules based on their routes, aircraft type, and number of pets allowed in their cargo space. That’s why it’s always a good idea to give your airline of choice a call and check the rules before attempting to fly with your leo.

To help get you started, some airlines that currently allow nonvenomous lizards in cargo are: American Airlines , Air Canada , Aegean Air , Air Europa , Alaska Air , Finnair (uses third party) , and WestJet .

You can find more information about each airline’s rules and regulations around transporting pets in cargo by clicking on the links provided.

Can You Bring A Leopard Gecko On A Train?

Like airlines, most train companies don’t allow live reptiles to travel onboard with their owners.

However, since there are so many different train services in various parts of the world, there may be some that do. It would be a good idea to contact your local train company in advance of your trip to inquire about traveling with your leopard gecko.

Final Thoughts

With a little preparation, traveling with your leopard gecko can be a smooth and relatively stress-free experience.

Just take the time to do some research, prepare the necessary supplies, and pack essential items for the journey ahead. Once you arrive at your destination, monitor your gecko for a few days to make sure they’re settling back in ok.

With these simple steps, and by following the recommendations given in this article, you should be all set for a safe and successful adventure with your scaly friend.

Safe travels!

About The Author

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Stephanie Barreto

All Gecko

6 Best Leopard Gecko Setup Ideas

Both children and adults like keeping leopard geckos as pets. They are little, silent, colorful, and simple to handle, but they need the right surroundings to survive, just like other reptiles. 

A leopard gecko’s health and general happiness in your care depend on having a correctly constructed enclosure. Especially for new reptile keepers, establishing a leopard gecko environment can be complicated because of the need for the right lighting, temperature, humidity, and decorations.

A leopard gecko’s tank layout should closely resemble the animal’s natural environment. The first thing to remember is that leopard geckos are native to Asia and can be found in Pakistan, Afghanistan, Western India, Iraq, and Iran. These regions all share a characteristic–they are all hot, bright places that resemble deserts.

Look through this guide for leopard gecko tank setup ideas if you need help setting up your leopard gecko’s environment!

Leopard Gecko Tank Setup

terrarium with brown sand and tropical plants

Due to their resilient and adaptable nature, leopard geckos thrive in various enclosures and tank types. They are used to surviving in various difficult environments, including cracks between railroad ties and holes on the banks of arid riverbeds. 

When selecting a tank, there are many options available. There are differences in the materials, size, ventilation, and insulation between tanks.

Fortunately, selecting the ideal tank for such a leopard gecko is simple. Leopard geckos don’t have a particular preference for their habitat. Despite this, a few factors still distinguish some tanks from others.

Your gecko can live in a vivarium that is approximately 86 x 37.5 x 42 cm in size. To keep your gecko inside, and any potential predators (like cats) outside, and give your gecko access to enough fresh air and lighting conditions, ensure your tank has a screen lid.

Using a heat mat for reptile tanks can help you regulate the ground temperature within the vivarium. These can be purchased online or at any pet store.

Basking Lamp

Your leopard gecko must receive the proper kind and amount of light throughout the day. To do this, utilize a basking lamp since the environment must resemble your gecko’s native habitat.

Make sure to include a UV gradient. With the aid of a solar meter, the gradient can be determined to be Ferguson zone 1 with a UV index range of 0 to 0.7.

Infrared Heat Lamp

Using an infrared heat lamp, you can keep the air temperature stable at night.

The humidity in the tank can be measured using a hygrometer. If it is too high, consider using a smaller water bowl and boosting airflow through the tank; if it is too low, use a larger water dish or raise the level of wet moss in the tank.

Thermometer 

Within your leopard gecko’s vivarium, there must be a temperature gradient, with one side of the tank maintained warmer than the other. Monitor its vivarium temperature with a thermometer on both sides.

Paper Towels

A reasonable and simple choice that is especially suggested for juvenile geckos is paper towels. They may be shredded and need to be changed frequently, but they do not endanger your gecko’s health.

Reptile Sand Mat

Since all the “sand” particles are attached to the mat like gentle sandpaper, there is no chance of impaction. However, this texture could make cleaning difficult.

Tile made of slate is simple to remove, clean, and is excellent at retaining heat. They are also better looking than paper towels.

Leopard Gecko Tank Setup 1: Hideouts

A leopard gecko outside its hideout

A leopard gecko necessitates a large number of hiding places throughout its habitat so that it can hide there throughout the daytime to feel comfortable and secure. These hideouts can range from being as straightforward as Tupperware containers to as intricate as a real timber log or rock cave.

They also require a moist hideout to aid in shedding and hydration, in addition to basic hideouts. Three hideouts are a minimum requirement for a leopard gecko’s tank. One should go on the warm side, one on the cold side, and one in the middle. Your leopard gecko may thermoregulate by basking in a warmer or cooler environment thanks to its three hideouts.

Even while three hideouts are the minimum, adding more will give them a sense of security and more room to roam. Aim to disperse between four and five hideouts around the tank.

Warm Hideout

Most of the day will be spent in this hideout by your gecko. Put this immediately over the substrate that is covered in a heat mat.

Moist Hideout

Wet moss, paper towels, or EcoEarth should be used to maintain the moisture of this crucial hideout. When it comes time to shed skin, your gecko will look for a wet spot. Therefore, the middle or chilly side of the enclosure would work well because the water won’t evaporate as rapidly.

Optional Hideout

Adding a second hideout to the cage is not required, but it is preferred because it allows your gecko more alternatives for controlling its temperature and selecting the right environment.

Leopard Gecko Tank Setup 2: Plants

A leopard gecko hanging on the twig of a plant

Numerous plants, rocky outcrops, bushes, and rocks are present in a leopard gecko’s native habitat to help them blend into its surroundings and give cover. They will feel more at ease and secure in their tank if decorated.

A fantastic enhancement to a leopard gecko’s habitat is live plants. They imitate their original habitat, release oxygen, control humidity, provide shade, and give off a native feel and look. The greatest plants can endure warm, dry conditions while remaining small.

Real Plants

Due to a lack of light and moisture, most genuine plants cannot grow in a leopard gecko habitat, unlike tropical vivaria. Air plants are one of the uncommon exceptions. These rootless, slightly-alien-appearing plants can be affixed to rocks or walls and require little upkeep. At least some light should be present, and misting should occur once or twice weekly.

Even if choosing a terrarium with less light would make it challenging, some advise succulents without spikes. Additionally, vulnerable to stagnant air are succulents. The risk of exposing intruders outweighs their affordability and ease of use. Your leopard geckos could get sick from worms, mites, or other microscopic invertebrates.

Artificial Plants

A lot of settings involve fake plants. Whether or not you want artificial plants for your terrarium is a personal choice. There are some quite lifelike fake plants available. When performing routine terrarium maintenance, give elaborate models a good wash because they can easily become dusty.

Appropriate plants include:

  • Holiday Cactus
  • Prickly plants
  • Animate stones

Leopard Gecko Tank Setup 3: Substrates

A leopard gecko on a sand

For leopard gecko substrates, there are some nice and not-so-good options. Sand is, however, sometimes advertised as a suitable substrate for leopard geckos at pet retailers. Unfortunately, this is among the most damaging piece of false information regarding caring for one and is untrue.

Sand should not be utilized as a leopard gecko’s substrate since impaction is quite likely. The following are the ideal substrates for a leopard gecko enclosure:

Bioactive Substrate

A mixture of clay, organic soil, pebbles, and sand is a bioactive substrate. It is a great option because it closely resembles their natural substrate.

Stone tiles are quick, inexpensive, and a beautiful substrate that is easy to maintain while creating a natural appearance. The roughness of patterned stone and the way tiles retain heat to appeal to many lizards. A simple and inexpensive solution that is more difficult to maintain than tiles is a reptile sand mat.

For those who don’t mind their leopard gecko’s setup having a more industrial appearance, they make a terrific, simple substrate.

Leopard Gecko Tank Setup 4: Temperature

A red light bulb on a white background

Leopard geckos are ectothermic, which means their environment influences their internal temperature. Due to this, you must give both a temperature gradient—a warmer and a cooler area inside the terrarium—and a relatively consistent temperature in their tank. When they need more heat, leopard geckos will bask in a hot spot, but they will move to the opposite area to cool off if they grow too hot.

Leopard geckos, like all reptiles, benefit from a temperature gradient in their terrarium.

  • Basking surface temperature: 94-97°F (34-36°C)
  • Hide temperature: 90-92°F (32-33°C)
  • End temperature: 70-77°F (21-25°C)

Leopard geckos like to spend the daytime in warm hiding places to “charge” themselves for activity at night. To aid thermoregulation, a leopard gecko’s enclosure should contain at least two hideouts in various locations: one on the warmer end close to the heat source and another on the cool end.

Your leopard geckos can be heated in various ways: 

Suitable Lights 

Reptile lights in black or red provide heat and hidden lighting. They work best with heated pads and shouldn’t be utilized as the only heating source.

Ceramic Heaters

In their place, ceramic heaters are used. In contrast to bulbs, they do not produce any light. In all typical situations, they must be capable of heating.

Heating Pads

Simple heaters, called heating pads, are placed beneath the tank. They use little power and are affordable. They are positioned beneath one area of the tank, allowing you to establish a crucial temperature gradient.

Never use direct heating or heat pebbles since they could burn your gecko’s delicate, silky skin.

A thermometer must be used to check the temperature in both the hot and the cooler sections to ensure that the tank remains in a good range.

Leopard Gecko Tank Setup 5: Lighting

Two different light tubes on a blue background

It’s a frequent misperception that UVB light is unnecessary for a leopard gecko’s lighting arrangement. They are solitary and primarily active at night, so people presume this.

Although leopard geckos are nocturnal, they require a light source during the day to simulate a cycle of day and night. The leopard gecko’s lighting system on a timer should provide ten hours of lighting and 14 hours of darkness. It will maintain their health and assist in controlling their circadian rhythm.

It has been demonstrated that UVB lighting enhances vitamin D and calcium absorption, lowering the likelihood of vitamin deficiency and metabolic bone diseases. 

Place a T8 or T5 UVB fixture with a 6.0 to 10.0 bulb solely on a single end for your leopard gecko’s arrangement. A typical daytime basking bulb should be used with a UV light fixture.

Leopard Gecko Tank Setup 6: Decorations

A leopard gecko on a rock

Leopard geckos require some tank decoration to add complexity and enrichment to their habitat. Incorporating decorations toward the tank is acceptable as long as enough room remains for them to move around. Not only will decor improve the aesthetic appeal, but it will also add a sort of stimulation to the mind and body.

Bogs and Rocks

Bogs and rocks are crucial components of the decor. You may arrange your leopard gecko’s home with rocks and wood, giving critters shelter and climbing areas. The only thing that matters is adhering to particular safety regulations.

Any rock constructions you build must be tightly fastened to other rocks or the terrarium’s walls. Silicone glue is a straightforward method.

Always choose softer rocks over harder ones. In contrast, nature only sometimes provides smooth rocks, and your gecko may find it challenging to scale entirely smooth rocks. It is better to use your judgment when determining what kind of rocks to place in your terrarium.

Among the most popular pet geckos worldwide is the leopard gecko. They are adored for their simple setup, maintenance, and amiable attitudes. These lizards are indigenous to the deserts of Southwest Asia and the Middle East in the wild. Many inhabit rocky cracks and caves.

Leopard geckos make good pets and don’t require a complicated setup. Every hour of every day, your leopard gecko will engage with his terrarium surroundings. A good setup is crucial for your gecko’s quality of life.

Also important to consider is the vivarium’s aesthetic appeal as a decorative addition to your leopard gecko’s home setup.

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Searching for a new reptile terrarium is exciting! Picking out the perfect reptile terrarium to decorating it and filling it with everything your pet reptile could ever need is a fun process. Pet parents who want to find the best selection of reptile terrariums and tanks can do so at PetSmart. Here, we understand just how important your pet is and want to help you give them the best home possible. 

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6 Best Crested Gecko Terrariums, Cages, Tanks and Enclosures

Before you bring home a pet crested gecko, you will first need to choose an enclosure, cage, terrarium, tank, or whatever else you may call it. A good tank is essential to keeping a healthy and happy crested gecko. But, not all crested gecko enclosures are the same.

Crested gecko tanks should be spacious enough to support their arboreal activities. It also needs to be secure and well ventilated without costing a fortune.

Finding a terrarium for a crested gecko can be hard. They range in price, design, safety, and durability. Crested geckos kept in the wrong enclosure can suffer injuries and higher stress that can result in a shortened lifespan.

In this post, we give reviews of the six best crested gecko enclosures. Each terrarium has different features and is a bit different from others, but each one of them is right for geckos in its own way. By the end of our guide, you will be able to pick the best terrarium for crested gecko.

A Quick Comparison of the Best Products

The Six Best Crested Gecko Cages

Below are detailed reviews of the best terrariums for crested geckos. The reviews are based on our personal use of the tanks and customer feedback on official websites.

1. Best Overall: 2’x2’x2′ PVC Panel Reptile Enclosure

zen-habitat-enclosure-for-crested-gecko

Zen Habitats is a US-based company that specializes in manufacturing reptile enclosures. We have been using their products for quite some time now. They offer enclosures for almost every reptile and amphibian.

The 2’x2’x2′ PVC Panel Reptile Enclosure is our favorite enclosure for crested geckos. Made of 1″ anodized aluminum, bamboo printed PVC panels, front swinging acrylic doors, a galvanized steel screen top, and galvanized screen top.

The steel screen top is equipped with screen support bars and wire grommets, allowing you to place your lighting fixtures either within or outside the enclosure.

The Non-reflective surfaces reduce anxiety . This is especially helpful if you have a male crested gecko because they are territorial and do not like their own reflections.

This enclosure measures 2’x2’x2′ which is equal to 60-gallons of space for your gecko to climb, run around, and exercise. The extra space also gives you the freedom to decorate your tank the way you like without compromising the space.

  • The ideal tank for crested geckos
  • Durable: Made from high-quality material
  • 60-gallon equivalent – Best for adult crested gecko
  • Humidity levels from 0% to 100%  depending on the need
  • Front swinging acrylic doors for easy access
  • Galvanized steel screen with support bars for security and multiple lighting options
  • A humidity Shield included (but optional) for the top screen keeps the humidity high while allowing for ventilation
  • Humidity Shield helps maintain humidity while providing ventilation
  • 3-year warranty*
  • Editor’s pick for best tank for crested geckos.
  • Lightweight and easy to move.
  • Easy to clean and maintain.
  • Modern and attractive appearance.
  • Easy to assemble and disassemble.
  • Easy to store when not in use.
  • None. We love this cage.

2. Most Affordable: Zilla Vertical Tropical Starter Kit

zilla-vertical-tropical-kit

Zilla Tropical Reptile Vertical Starter Kit is another very good option on our list of best crested gecko terrariums. It’s an ideal choice for beginners as it comes with many accessories needed for crested gecko care .  

It comes with the substrate, textured background, a mini halogen dome, a halogen light bulb, some coconut husk bedding, a thermometer, and a hygrometer so you can maintain a comfortable environment for your crested gecko.

This crested gecko tank measures 12 x 12 x 18 inches which is a perfect size for a crested gecko. It offers a lot of vertical space for your crested gecko to climb and exercise. It comes with a large door for easy access to the interior. The door has a hinge for easy opening and a latch for locking to make sure your gecko doesn’t escape the terrarium.

So, if you are looking for a good starter kit for the crested gecko, we recommend the Zilla tropical kit because it has everything needed to take care of them and will get you started in no time.

  • Ideal for crested geckos, tree frogs, and many other small size lizards.
  • Durable glass build.
  • Large front door with locking latch for easy access and security
  • Hinged top for easy access.
  • Waterproof base (Can hold 5 inches of water in the bottom)
  • Comes with a feeding dish, temp gauge, and substrate.
  • Takes only a small space
  • A lot of vertical climbing space
  • Mini Halogen Dome with light bulb
  • Ships with reinforced packaging to protect the product.
  • Comes with most of the equipment needed to start a crested gecko terrarium.
  • Made of durable and long-lasting materials.
  • The kit is cost-effective.
  • Allows for easier viewing of the gecko from all angles.
  • The kit does not include all the necessary items.
  • The heat mat included in the kit may not provide sufficient heat.

3. Exo Terra Glass Nano

Exo-Terra-Glass-Natural-Terrarium-Nano

The Exo Terra Glass Natural Terrarium Nano is the perfect glass terrarium for crested geckos. It is available in 12 different sizes, all built with the same features. The front opening door on the nano/tall model makes feeding and maintenance very easy.

The terrarium comes with a removable full-screen top that allows UVB and infrared penetration and make cleaning easier. It also features a specially designed lock that will prevent your gecko from escaping.

Crested geckos like vertical climbing space, so a tall terrarium is preferred. The Exo Terra Glass Natural Terrarium Nano tall model is the best option for them. You can easily fit decorating items inside the terrarium like plants and make a realistic crested gecko habitat.

The exo terra tank comes with closable inlets for tubing and wires that make installing the heater and misting tools a lot easier. It also features a waterproof base so that water does not leak out.

  • Glass terrarium best for crested geckos and many other reptiles
  • Patented front window ventilation
  • Waterproof base
  • Raised bottom frame in order to install a substrate heater.
  • Escape-proof door locks
  • Closable inlets for wires and/or tubing management
  • Natural-Looking Rock Background (extra climbing space for geckos)
  • Easy to clean and provides excellent visibility for the geckos.
  • The terrarium has a locking screen top, which prevents the geckos from escaping and also allows for easy access to the enclosure.
  • Comes with a background sheet, which helps to create a more natural-looking habitat for the geckos.
  • Lightweight and easy to move around.
  • The terrarium may be too small to accommodate larger decorations or hiding spots for the geckos.
  • The terrarium may not be suitable for more advanced crested gecko keepers who are looking for more customization options or a larger enclosure.

4. Zoo Med ReptiBreeze

zoo-med-reptibreeze-open-air-screen-cage

Zoo Med ReptiBreeze is an open-air screen cage with a more natural look. It is made of specially treated anodized aluminum mesh. Unlike the previous Exo Terra Glass Natural Terrarium which is made of glass. It’s available in 4 different sizes i.e. small, medium, large and extra-large. The medium size which is 16 x 16 x 30-Inches is enough space to house 2 smaller geckos.

It offers a lot of vertical space for your gecko to climb, something crested geckos love to do. You can add a lot of plants to the enclosure to make it look natural and for the gecko to climb on.

Zoo Med ReptiBreeze comes with a large front door that makes cleaning and maintaining the enclosure easy. Also, at the bottom of the cage, it has a drawer that is designed in a way to make substrate cleaning easy. Substrates do get dirty after sometimes, so having a drawer at the bottom is a plus point.

  • A better option for crested geckos and many other arboreal species of lizards
  • Corrosion-resistant anodized aluminum mesh
  • Large front door for easy cage access
  • Large bottom door for easy substrate removal
  • Easy to assemble (requires only a screwdriver)
  • Good for ventilation.
  • Large enough for 2 geckos.
  • Good for vertical climbing space.
  • All hardware included
  • Can be easily assembled and disassembled for transport or storage.
  • Can be used as both an indoor and outdoor enclosure.
  • May not provide enough insulation for extreme temperature fluctuations.
  • May not be suitable for areas with high humidity levels.
  • May not provide enough privacy for the crested gecko.

5. Best for Beginners: Exo Terra Rainforest Habitat Kit

exo-terra-rainforest-habitat-kit

Exo Terra Rainforest Habitat Kit is another great starter kit for crested geckos. It comes with all the necessary tools needed for crested geckos such as substrate, water dish, jungle vines, jungle rope, and a care guide that will get you started in no time.

This crested gecko terrarium comes with dual opening doors. This is specifically beneficial in accessing the interior of the tank for cleaning, feeding, and other maintenance. The front of the tank has unique window ventilation which means a lot of fresh air for your pet.  

  • Ideal for snakes, frogs, lizards, and geckos
  • Dual front doors for an escape free access
  • Unique front window ventilation
  • Full metal screen for top ventilation
  • Compact top lighting system
  • Natural-Looking rock background
  • Includes all necessary decoration items
  • Made of high-quality materials
  • Front-opening door, make it easy to access and clean.
  • Removable mesh top that allows for proper ventilation and prevents escapes.
  • The terrarium is attractive and can be a decorative addition to a room.
  • The included substrate may not be suitable for all crested gecko
  • Maintaining proper temperature and humidity levels can be challenging.

6. Zoo Med Naturalistic Terrarium

zoo-med-naturalistic-errarium

Zoo Med Naturalistic Terrarium is a simple but durable terrarium with a more natural look. So, if you are looking for a natural-looking crested gecko tank setup then this would be a great fit for you.

It is available in 3 different sizes. For crested gecko, we recommend a medium-size which is 12 x 12 x 18. It offers enough vertical space for geckos who love to climb.

The tank is made of glass that allows you to see and monitor your pet’s activities without opening the terrarium. It also features a special screen top that keeps feeder insects in while allowing greater UVA and UVB penetration which is a bonus point.

  • Special screen top
  • Lockable door for safety and security
  • Front and top ventilation
  • Full Front glass opening door with snap closure.
  • 6 power cord and airline tubing exit slots.
  • Provides a realistic, naturalistic environment for crested geckos to thrive in.
  • Allows for plenty of climbing and hiding opportunities for the geckos.
  • Comes with a removable, easy-to-clean substrate tray.
  • Durable and well-made.
  • Comes with a removable screen divider to separate different geckos if needed.
  • The terrarium may not be as easy to transport as other, smaller reptile housing options.
  • It may not be as easy to set up as other terrariums.
  • It may be difficult to find replacement parts or accessories for the terrarium if something breaks or needs to be replaced.

Things to Know Before Buying a Crested Gecko Tank

The design and size of a crested gecko tank impact its safety, effectiveness, and how long it will last. Despite the differences, good enclosures for crested geckos have several things in common:

Crested gecko tank size and design are the most important things to look for when buying a crested gecko enclosure.

A minimum of 20-gallon tall terrarium is required for an adult crested gecko but remember, the bigger the tank the better. If you are planning to house 2 or 3 crested geckos together then at least a 30-gallon tank is should be used.

We recommend a 60-gallon tank for a single crested gecko that will support all its arboreal activities.

Baby crested gecko can be kept in 10-gallon tanks with a screen lid which promotes ventilation and fresh air in the tank.

You have to keep an eye out on your baby crested geckos weight when starting in a small enclosure and as it grows with time you should upgrade the terrarium accordingly. They become stressed in a smaller size thank.

Crested geckos are arboreal and active animals and need lots of vertical space for climbing so a tall tank is preferred.

The enclosure should be secured with key lock security. Crested geckos are quite jumpy and can accidentally escape the cage. Enclosures with front-opening doors should have a solid latch to secure the doors in place.

Durable crested gecko terrariums are sturdy and solid with no loose parts. A well-built enclosure will last the lifespan of a crested gecko without the need for replacement.

Here are some pointers that should be kept in mind before buying an enclosure for your pet crested gecko.

  • Crested geckos love to climb and are known for it so preference should be given to tall terrariums.
  • Get additional items if they are not included or maybe needed as spare such as bulbs, other lighting accessories, heat-producing items, non-toxic plants & misting systems.  
  • Follow the rule of thumb of 5 grams and 10 grams to get below 10 gallons or above a 10-gallon terrarium.
  • Get a humidity and temperature gauge to keep the optimal levels needed for crested gecko.
  • Crested geckos can be quite jumpy and escape their enclosure now and then, to prevent that from happening make sure you get an enclosure with secure doors from the front & at the top for ease of access and ventilation.

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  • Start date Nov 7, 2012
  • Nov 7, 2012

I looked around for information on this but could not find anything so I apologize if this is a repeat. I want to know how to make a temporary or travel cage for my future leo. This would be used for boarding, cleaning the real tank, and possibly staying at a beach house or something. I won't be able to take his tank to the boarder, for example, so I was thinking I could make something like what would go in a rack, only portable. Here is what I was thinking: - a plastic storage bin like this: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0019TWJTG/ref=s9_simh_gw_p201_d0_i1?pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-2&pf_rd_r=0DQYJ197Q93XTAPNWYXV&pf_rd_t=101&pf_rd_p=1389517282&pf_rd_i=507846 - paper towels on the bottom - heating cable/tape (I'm not sure how to use this, tips would be appreciated) - plastic container for humid hide - other hides -food/water bowls I guess the biggest thing is just whether it is possible/practical and if anyone has done a "travel cage" and also what to use as a top. Thanks!  

Mel's Exotics

Note: my experience is with other lizards, not leos specifically. Suggestion: why not make the main tank portable? There's tons of stress on a reptile just moving to a new home, keeping the same tank at least gives them a bit of familiarity. We want our reptiles as stress-free as possible. At the very least, consider using his normal hide and decorations. I would use a large plastic tote w/ lid, with a heat mat stuck to the bottom. In this case I would use the commercial heat mats, since they're sticky, but you could tape heat tape/cable to the bin as well. Heat mat needs to be plugged into a temp controller to keep the tank safe, just like in a rack. If the tote is clear, paint/tape 3 sides to be dark. If the tote is dark, consider turning it onto it's side and DIYing the lid into a front-opening door? Use any substrate and hides/decoration you want. This is a nice setup for the gecko, but may not be as visually pretty as your main tank would have been. If you want to have a pretty, non-portable main tank consider having everything on timers/temp controllers and having a friend stop in to feed/clean/change water. Instead of dragging the gecko all over the place. Stress can be dangerous. Keep in mind during moving the tank, the gecko needs to be in a secure container, not free-roaming the tank (if something moves during transport the animal can get hurt).  

I would just use his normal cage but it has 35lbs of rocks in it. Sometimes I go with my family to the beach for a while over the summer and would rather take him than have someone checking up on him for that long. I guess I'd like to see if anyone has done this?  

DrCarrotTail

DrCarrotTail

When in transit I would recommend putting him in a small container such as a tupperware sandwich container or deli container. There should be enough room for him to turn around and a slightly damp paper towel or two. The more room in the container the farther the animal has to fly if dropped or if a car stops short. If you insist on using a carrier keep it bare while in transit. Any "furniture" can move and hurt or even kill your leo. Once I get where I'm going, I have a spare 10 gallon with a heat mat, a couple hides and a moist hide I've dragged with me when needed.  

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Leopard Gecko Travel Cage

Leopard geckos are a type of reptile that is often kept as a pet. Many people choose to keep their leopard geckos in a cage or tank inside their home. However, there may be times when it is necessary or desirable to take the leopard gecko on the go. In these cases, it is important to have a travel cage that is the right size and is appropriate for the needs of the leopard gecko.

There are several things to consider when choosing a travel cage for a leopard gecko. The size of the cage is important, as the leopard gecko needs room to move around. The cage should also be tall enough that the leopard gecko can climb to the top and bask in the sun. Additionally, the cage should have a secure lid to prevent the leopard gecko from escaping.

One option for a travel cage for a leopard gecko is a plastic storage container. This type of cage is often the right size and is easy to transport. It is also easy to clean and can be disinfected if needed. Another option is a small animal carrier. This type of carrier is often made of wire mesh and has a plastic bottom. It is important to make sure that the carrier has a secure lid to prevent the leopard gecko from escaping.

When choosing a travel cage for a leopard gecko, it is important to make sure that the cage is big enough for the leopard gecko to move around in and that it has a secure lid.

  • 1 Can I travel with my leopard gecko?
  • 2 How do you take care of a leopard gecko while on vacation?
  • 3 Can you leave a leopard gecko alone for a week?
  • 4 How do you transport a leopard gecko?
  • 5 How long can a leopard gecko be in a car?
  • 6 How long can leopard geckos be out of their tank?
  • 7 What to do with reptiles when you go on vacation?

Can I travel with my leopard gecko?

Yes, you can travel with your leopard gecko, but there are some things you need to know first.

The first thing you need to do is make sure your leopard gecko is healthy and free of parasites. You also need to make sure it is properly vaccinated.

Once you have done that, you need to make sure you have the right supplies. You will need a secure cage, food, water, and a heat source.

If you are travelling by car, you can put your leopard gecko in a secure container and place it in the backseat. If you are travelling by plane, you will need to check with the airline to see if they allow reptiles on board.

If you are travelling to a cold climate, you will need to make sure your leopard gecko has a warm place to hide.

If you are travelling to a hot climate, you will need to make sure your leopard gecko has a cool place to hide.

Overall, travelling with your leopard gecko is not too difficult, but it is important to take the necessary precautions.

How do you take care of a leopard gecko while on vacation?

Leopard geckos are one of the most popular pet lizards and can be easy to care for as long as you have the right supplies. If you’re going on vacation and need to take care of your leopard gecko while you’re gone, there are a few things you need to do to make sure he or she stays healthy.

The most important thing is to make sure your leopard gecko has a place to hide. Leopard geckos like to hide in dark, enclosed spaces, so make sure you have a hiding place for him or her. A small cardboard box works well, or you can buy a special lizard hide.

Another important thing is to make sure your leopard gecko has plenty of water. You can buy a special lizard water dish, or you can use a small dish or cup and fill it with water every day.

Your leopard gecko will also need food while you’re on vacation. You can buy a special lizard diet or you can use crickets. Be sure to buy enough crickets to last your leopard gecko the entire time you’re gone.

If you’re going to be gone for a week or more, you may want to consider finding a pet sitter to take care of your leopard gecko for you. A pet sitter can make sure your leopard gecko has food, water, and a place to hide while you’re away.

If you’re not able to find a pet sitter, you can leave your leopard gecko with a friend or family member. Just be sure to give them a list of what your leopard gecko needs so they can take care of him or her properly.

No matter who you leave your leopard gecko with, make sure to pack up all of his or her supplies so he or she will have everything they need while you’re gone.

With a little preparation, you can easily take care of your leopard gecko while on vacation.

Can you leave a leopard gecko alone for a week?

Leopard geckos are a popular pet choice and can make great companions. They are relatively easy to care for and do not require a lot of attention. This means that they can be left alone for a period of time without any issues. However, it is important to understand that there are some things that you should not do when leaving a leopard gecko alone.

One of the most important things to remember is that leopard geckos require a certain level of humidity in their environment. If the humidity is too low, they can experience health problems. You can help to maintain the proper humidity level by providing a water dish that they can drink from and by misting the enclosure a few times a day.

Another thing to keep in mind is that leopard geckos need to be kept at the correct temperature. The ideal temperature range for leopard geckos is 70-80 degrees Fahrenheit. If the temperature is too low, they can experience health problems. If the temperature is too high, they can experience health problems or even die.

It is also important to make sure that the leopard gecko’s enclosure is clean. Leopard geckos can be prone to developing skin problems if their environment is not kept clean.

In general, leopard geckos can be left alone for a week without any issues. However, it is important to take into account the things that I have mentioned here. By following these guidelines, you can help to ensure that your leopard gecko stays healthy and happy.”

How do you transport a leopard gecko?

Leopard geckos are one of the most popular reptile pets and for good reason – they’re relatively easy to care for and are known for being docile. If you need to transport your leopard gecko for any reason, here are a few tips to make the process as stress-free as possible for both you and your gecko.

The first step is to find a suitable container in which to transport your leopard gecko. A small box or container with ventilation is ideal. You may also want to place a few towels or other soft materials inside the container to provide your gecko with some comfort.

Once you have your container ready, it’s time to gather up your leopard gecko’s supplies. Be sure to include a water dish, food dish, and a few climbing branches or other objects your gecko can use to climb on and hide in.

If you’re travelling by car, it’s best to place your leopard gecko’s container in the backseat so it’s away from the wind and sun. If you’re travelling by plane, be sure to check with the airline to see if they have any restrictions on travelling with reptiles.

If you’re travelling a long distance, it’s a good idea to stop every few hours to allow your leopard gecko to get some exercise and use the bathroom.

Overall, transporting a leopard gecko is a relatively easy process. By following the tips above, you can help make the journey as stress-free as possible for both you and your gecko.

How long can a leopard gecko be in a car?

Leopard geckos are one of the most popular reptile pets, and they can make great companions for those who are looking for an easy-to-care-for pet. One question that many people have is how long can a leopard gecko be in a car?

The short answer is that a leopard gecko can be in a car for a few hours without any problems. However, it is important to make sure that your leopard gecko is kept in a cool and comfortable environment while it is in the car. You should also make sure that your leopard gecko has access to water.

If you are traveling with your leopard gecko, it is important to make sure that you have a safe and secure place for your pet to ride. You should also make sure that your leopard gecko is properly secured in its carrier.

It is important to note that leopard geckos are not the best pets for car trips. If you are traveling a long distance, it is best to leave your leopard gecko at home.

How long can leopard geckos be out of their tank?

Leopard geckos are a popular pet lizard and can be kept in a variety of environments, including a tank. While they can spend some time out of their tank, they should not be out of their tank for more than an hour at a time.

What to do with reptiles when you go on vacation?

If you’re a reptile owner, the question of what to do with your pet when you go on vacation is an important one. Luckily, there are a number of options available to you.

The first option is to find a friend or family member who can take care of your reptile while you’re away. This is often the easiest option, as your reptile will be in familiar surroundings and will likely be taken care of by someone who is familiar with their needs.

If you don’t have anyone who can take care of your reptile, you may want to consider boarding them at a local pet store or veterinarian’s office. This can be a good option if you’re worried about your pet’s welfare, as most pet stores and veterinarians have experience caring for reptiles.

Finally, you can also choose to leave your pet at home. This option is not recommended unless you have a friend or family member who can check in on your pet regularly. If you choose this option, be sure to provide your pet with a safe, comfortable place to stay and enough food and water to last the duration of your trip.

No matter which option you choose, be sure to give your pet plenty of time to adjust to their new surroundings before you leave. This will help ensure a smooth transition for your pet and minimize the stress of being away from home.

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How to SAFELY Travel with Pet Lizards in a Car [Ultimate Guide]

car travel with lizard guide

Travelling with a lizard in a car may seem like a daunting task. You probably have lots of questions – how should you transport your lizard? What will you need to pack? How do you ensure he stays warm enough?

As long as you prepare, it can be pretty straight forward.

Whether you are planning a quick trip to the vet, or are moving house, here is some guidance and tips on how to ensure your lizard arrives safe and sound.

To ensure your lizard feels comfortable and secure while travelling in a car, you will need to prepare:

Transport your lizard in a sturdy, secure and well ventilated container.

  • Line the bottom of the carrier with a grippy material.
  • Warm the carrier if necessary.
  • Get your reptile used to it’s travel container.
  • Pack all the essentials.
  • Secure your lizard’s container in your car.
  • Try to keep stops to a minimum.
  • Do not take your lizard out of its travel carrier.
  • Look out for signs of sickness during and after the car journey.

In this article we will go into detail on how to ensure that taking your lizard in a car is stress-free for both you and your reptile.

gecko travel cage

You have 2 options.

a) Taking your lizard travelling in it’s usual home.

You may want to travel with your lizard in it’s usual tank or container if you will be staying at your destination for a long period of time, for example, if you are moving house.

That works! However, there are a few things to be cautious of.

Firstly, remove any objects from inside container that could potentially move around or fall. Additionally, if your lizard lives in a open top container, ensure that there are no objects around that could fall into the container. If you experience some bumps in the road you don’t want anything to injure your little friend.

Finally, make sure that the tank or cage is in a secure place that will minimise movement. You want to avoid the container sliding around the car.

The possibility of injury in a moving car may make it advisable to put your pet in a smaller, more secure carrier.

b) Travelling with your lizard in a small travel carrier.

If you don’t have space for your lizards usual home, or you just don’t want to carry a glass tank, you can choose to use a soft-sided or hard-sided carrier.

The size of the travel carrier you opt for depends on the species of your lizard. Generally, the travel carrier needs to be big enough that your lizard can move around inside, but not so big that it could get thrown around during transportation.

You can easily adapt any kind of sealable plastic container as long as it has air holes. You could even punch some air holes in yourself. For large reptiles, like iguanas, a plastic dog or cat carrier can also work.

POPULAR LIZARD TRAVEL CARRIERS

gecko travel cage

How to prepare a lizard’s travel carrier.

a) Line the bottom of the carrier with a grippy material.

This can be newspaper, paper towel or pads. You can also use blankets on the bottom, which is recommended particularly during cold weather.

Line the bottom of the carrier with wet towels if your lizard needs a moist environment, or dry towels if it doesn’t.

This will also provide some extra cushioning for transportation.

b) Warm the carrier if necessary.

Depending on the weather, and the species of your lizard, you will want to consider controlling the temperature of the carrier. It also depends on how long your journey will be.

Tips for warming your lizard while travelling:

  • Use heat packs or like hand warmers, these will emit heat for many hours.
  • Pop an extra blanket inside the carrier for insulation.
  • Wrap the container in blankets or old jumpers.
  • Use a hot water bottle to keep them warm on shorter journeys.

gecko travel cage

Get your reptile used to it’s travel home before taking your lizard in the car.

If you will be using a travel carrier, try to purchase it at least 1 week in advance.

This is because you want your lizard to feel relaxed and at home in the carrier, in order to minimise stress.

Introduce your lizard to its carrier at least 1 week before your journey, starting off with just a few minutes at a time, and working your way up to at least 30 minutes.

Keep the rest of your reptile’s routine the same so that they don’t get stressed out before it’s time to go.

gecko travel cage

Pack all the essentials for the car journey.

The amount that you will need to bring will depend on how long your car trip will be.

If you are just going on a short drive to the vets, then you will need the basics. However, if you are going on a longer car drive, then you should pack more, in case of emergencies.

  • Food and water
  • Bedding, blanket and towels
  • Cleaning supplies
  • Thermometer
  • Heaters – hot water bottle, hand warmers or heat packs
  • Vet’s number
  • Spray bottle

If you are planning on staying somewhere overnight, then you may also need the following:

  • UVB and/or basking light

gecko travel cage

What to do on the day of travel.

a) Prepare your lizard’s carrier.

This should be done just before the journey as you want your lizard to be away from it’s normal environment for a minimum amount of time.

Refer to Section #2 How To Prepare Your Lizard’s Carrier.

b) Secure your lizard’s container in your car.

Ensure that your lizard’s carrier is in a secure position and won’t risk falling over.

You can secure the carrier in the passenger seat or a backseat with the seat belt, or place in on the floor. Keeping your lizard in the passenger seat will allow you to keep a close eye on him/her. 

c) Try to keep stops to a minimum.

The sooner you get your pet lizard to your destination and back to its normal environment and routine, the better.

Of course, you will need to make some stops to give them some water, depending on the species of your lizard. Just be sure to keep these breaks short.

You want to minimise stress as it can have a big negative impact on your lizard’s physical and mental health.

d) Check up on your lizard while in the car

The longer your journey, the more attention you’ll need to pay to your lizard.

On a long journey, make sure that your lizard is eating and drinking enough, and look out for any abnormal behaviour.

gecko travel cage

What to do after taking your lizard in a car.

a) Return your lizard to it’s normal environment or recreate is as accurate as possible.

Depending on your lizard’s species and personality, he/she may experience stress during or after the trip.

This can be down to a handful of reasons, such as undergoing a change in their environment, as well as experiencing new sights, sounds and smells.

The stress of a long car journey may last several days and up to a week in some cases. This is highly likely be the case if your lizard doesn’t return to it’s usual home after the trip as it can take some time for lizard’s to acclimate to their new environment. In some severe cases, this may even last up to a month.

b) Look out for signs of sickness after taking your lizard in the car.

Symptoms of a stressed lizard include not eating, lethargy and changes to its poop (e.g. not pooping, runny or darker coloured stools).

Stressed lizards are more prone to getting sick, so be sure to look out for the common signs of illness in lizards:

  • Increased or decreased eating and drinking habits – not eating or drinking / vomiting / regurgitation / excessive water soaking
  • Changes in stool or urine  – straining / increased or decreased waste production / changes in appearance
  • Lumps or bumps – blisters / scabs / bruises / inflammation / redness
  • Changes in general appearance – weight loss or gain / changes in colour / swelling of the limbs, jaw, tail or digits
  • Activity level changes – lethargy / increased activity / decreased activity / staying in only one corner of the cage / generally weak
  • Limping or lameness – paralysis / signs of trauma
  • Changes in posture – acting disoriented / unable to assume normal posture
  • Breathing problems – open mouth breathing / wheezing or squeaking sounds / excessive saliva / bubbles from nostrils

If you suspect that your lizard is sick, take him to the vet as soon as possible to get checked out.

car travel with lizard guide

Travelling with your lizard in the car will take some planning and preparations, but it can be done stress-free.

Just be sure to prepare your lizard’s travel container so that he doesn’t risk getting injured. If you’re using a separate travel carrier, make sure that you allow time for your lizard to get used to it before the trip.

Secure the carrier tightly in your car and keep a close eye on your lizard’s behaviour throughout, and after the trip.

Lizard’s who have experienced stress are more prone to getting sick, so, if you suspect that your lizard is unwell, take him to the vet as soon as possible to get checked out.

Hope you have found this helpful.

Safe travels!

Related post –  Bearded Dragon Leash-Training: Step by Step Guide to Walking your Lizard

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Can I Leave My Leopard Gecko Alone for a Week

e697b66408db4f378118f58d2fdb8ee4

Leopard geckos are one of the most popular pets in the reptile world. They are small, docile lizards that are easy to care for and make great first-time reptiles. One common question new leopard gecko owners have is whether or not they can leave their gecko alone for a week. The answer is yes, you can leave your leopard gecko alone for a week as long as you take some precautions.

  • -Take your leopard gecko to a vet for a checkup to make sure it is healthy enough to be left alone for a week
  • – Find someone who is willing and able to care for your leopard gecko while you are away
  • This person should have experience caring for reptiles
  • – Leave your leopard gecko with food and water and instructions on how to care for it
  • – Check in with the person caring for your leopard gecko periodically to make sure everything is going well

Can I Leave My Leopard Gecko Alone for a Week

Credit: geckoadvice.com

Table of Contents

Can You Leave Geckos Alone for a Week?

Yes, you can leave geckos alone for a week. They are able to survive on their own without any assistance. Geckos are independent creatures and do not require much care. If you are gone for more than a week, it is best to have someone check on them to make sure they have food and water.

How Long Can I Leave Leopard Gecko Alone?

Leopard geckos are one of the most popular reptiles kept as pets. They are relatively easy to care for and don’t require a lot of space, making them a great choice for first-time reptile owners. One of the most common questions new leopard gecko owners have is “How long can I leave my leopard gecko alone?” The answer to this question depends on a few factors, including the age and health of your leopard gecko, the temperature and humidity of their enclosure, and whether or not they have access to food and water. Generally speaking, an adult leopard gecko can be left alone for up to two weeks without any problems. Juvenile leopard geckos, on the other hand, should not be left alone for more than a week. If you must leave your leopard gecko for an extended period of time, it’s best to arrange for someone else to check on them regularly to make sure they are doing okay. As long as their basic needs are met (i.e. food, water, appropriate temperature and humidity), leopard geckos are pretty hardy creatures and can withstand being left alone for short periods of time without any problems. However, it’s always best to err on the side of caution and either bring your leopard gecko with you or arrange for someone else to check on them while you’re gone.

What Do You Do With a Leopard Gecko When You Go on Vacation?

If you have a leopard gecko, you will need to make arrangements for someone to care for your pet while you are on vacation. This is because leopard geckos cannot survive without food and water for more than a few days. There are a few options available for vacation care. You can ask a friend or family member to come over daily to feed and water your gecko. Alternatively, you could board your pet at a reptile-specific facility. Finally, some people choose to hire professional pet sitters who are experienced in caring for all kinds of animals. Whichever option you choose, be sure to provide detailed instructions on how to care for your leopard gecko. This should include information on what type of food to give them, how often to feed them, and how much water they need each day. It is also important to note where their hiding place is located so that they can be easily found when it is time to put them back in their enclosure.

Do Leopard Geckos Like to Be Left Alone?

Leopard geckos are a type of lizard that is native to parts of Asia and Africa. They are also one of the most popular types of pet lizards in the world. Leopard geckos are known for being relatively docile and easy to care for, which may be part of the reason why they make such good pets. As far as whether or not leopard geckos like to be left alone, it really depends on the individual animal. Some leopard geckos may enjoy having their own space and not being bothered by humans or other animals, while others may prefer to interact with their owners or other creatures. There is no right or wrong answer when it comes to this question, as every leopard gecko has its own personality and preferences.

Top 5 Reptiles You Can LEAVE FOR A WEEK | Vacation Friendly, Self Sustaining Reptiles

Gecko Vacation Feeder

Assuming you would like a blog post about gecko vacation feeders: As a pet owner, it’s important to make sure your animal is well taken care of even when you’re away on vacation. But what do you do with your beloved gecko while you’re gone? A gecko vacation feeder is the perfect solution! A gecko vacation feeder is a device that will automatically dispense food for your gecko while you’re away. Simply fill it with your gecko’s favorite food, set the timer, and leave! Your geckos will be well-fed and happy while you’re gone. There are many different types of gecko vacation feeders available on the market, so be sure to do your research to find one that’s right for your needs. But with a little planning, your geckos can enjoy a stress-free vacation too!

How Long Can You Leave a Gecko Alone

If you’re considering getting a gecko as a pet, one of the questions you might have is how long can you leave them alone. The answer to this question depends on a few factors, including the age and species of your gecko. Generally speaking, younger geckos shouldn’t be left alone for more than a day or two. This is because they are still growing and need regular feeding and care. Adult geckos, on the other hand, can usually be left alone for up to a week without any problems. Of course, there are always exceptions to the rule. Some geckos are simply more high-maintenance than others and may need more frequent feeding and attention. If you’re unsure about whether your particular gecko falls into this category, it’s always best to err on the side of caution and check in on them more often rather than less. In general, though, most geckos are pretty low-maintenance pets that can easily be taken care of even when you’re away from home for a few days. So if you’re looking for a pet that won’t require too much time or effort on your part, a gecko could be perfect for you!

How Long Can You Leave a Crested Gecko Alone

Crested geckos are one of the most popular reptiles kept as pets. They are easy to care for and make great first pets for children or beginners. One common question people have about cresties is how long can you leave them alone? The answer is that it really depends on the individual gecko. Some can be left alone for a week or more, while others may need to be fed every few days. If you are unsure whether your gecko can go without food for a few days, it is always best to err on the side of caution and feed them every day.

Is it Okay to Leave My Leopard Gecko Outside for a Week?

Leopard geckos are not suited for outdoor environments. taking your leopard gecko outside for a week may expose them to extreme temperatures, predators, and stress. These reptiles are best kept in a controlled, safe environment indoors to ensure their well-being and longevity.

Leopard Gecko Travel Cage

A travel cage for a leopard gecko is a small, lightweight enclosure that can be easily carried when traveling. The cage should be big enough for the gecko to move around and turn around comfortably, but not so big that it is cumbersome to carry. Some travel cages have removable top panels so that the gecko can be easily removed for cleaning or inspection. A mesh top panel provides good ventilation and allows the gecko to see out while preventing escape.

Leopard geckos are a popular pet reptile, known for their docile nature and easy care requirements. Many leopard gecko owners wonder if they can leave their pet alone for a week without any problems. The answer is yes, you can leave your leopard gecko alone for a week without any problems! However, there are a few things you should do to prepare your gecko and their tank before you go: – Make sure the tank is clean and all food and water dishes are filled. – Leave the temperature in the tank set at the correct level for your leopard gecko. – Place some hide spots in the tank so your gecko can feel safe and secure while you’re gone.

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  • The 10 Best Lizards To Keep As Pets

I ntroducing a new pet into the home is a big decision, especially when you want to get it so the kids to learn some responsibility and bonding. Though the most common pets to adopt are dogs and cats, adopting reptiles has become increasingly common. These cold-blooded creatures may look intimidating as pets, but they are some of the easiest to take on.

There are many different types of reptiles, so it could be difficult to find the best pet lizards without a little guidance. Is a bearded dragon the right one for you? Can a leopard gecko be a good option for beginners?

Let’s dive into the 10 best pet lizards and explore the best pet lizard types:

#10 Caiman Lizards

Though the Caiman Lizard is at the bottom of this list, it is still incredibly friendly and one of the better pet lizard types. They make a great companion for any owner. Caiman lizards are suitable as pets, but they require experienced reptile enthusiasts to care for them properly.

They get rather large at 5 feet long, so a big enclosure is needed to contain them. However, for a beginner that wants to train them, they can be quite fun. With rainbow colors and a lot of patience, the Caiman Lizard is perfect for beginners that want to take on a larger animal instead of a more traditional reptile.

Because of its length, a Caiman lizard will need an enclosure that is between 4-6 feet long, 1-3 feet wide, and 2-4 feet tall. Part of the terrarium should have a large water area where the lizard can fully submerge, as well as things to climb on. Caiman lizards come from a tropical habitat where they are used to temperatures in the range of 80-90 degrees Fahrenheit, even 100 or more degrees when they are basking. 

They need UVA and UVB rays for vitamin D3 which promotes their overall health as well as an activity like feeding.  A combination of natural sunlight, an Exo Terra Halogen spot lamp, and a Reptisun or Powersun UV lamp will help you replicate the environment a Caiman lizard needs to thrive.  It will also need a comfortable branch in its enclosure to relax on for basking.  

The diet of a pet Caiman lizard can consist of crickets, canned snails and shrimp, super worms, and fruit like kiwi, banana, papaya, and mango.  They also need a reptile multivitamin and calcium supplement. 

As the lifespan of a Caiman lizard is roughly 10 years, a pet owner is looking at an investment of time and money for the setup and maintenance of the pet, as well as space in your house.  Take these things into consideration before taking the plunge.  You should purchase a Caiman lizard through a reputable reptile breeder and can pay anywhere from $350 to $1500.

#9 Green Iguanas

Green iguanas tend to be rather easy pet lizard types for beginners to take care of because there are no carnivorous tendencies. These reptiles are herbivores, so they should be fairly easy to feed. Still, with how large they get (up to 6 feet long), they’d need an enclosure similar to that of the Caiman lizard, but even larger to account for their longer length. Their tank will also require a water pool.

Iguanas are relatively friendly and easy to tame. While they are great for beginners, the amount of care needed to own one means you will need to be able to dedicate time, energy, and money. Green iguanas average $25 – $40. While this may seem like an affordable option for a pet lizard on the surface, the investment in all the care and maintenance can get quite expensive.

A terrarium or cage for the iguana can cost between $150-$1000 depending on size and preference. UVB light bulbs would be an investment between $29 and $300 twice a year. Food for your iguana can cost from $1 – $50 per day .

And as it’s an exotic pet, veterinary care for your pet green iguana can cost on average $200 – $300 a year for general care, but run in the thousands for more serious health issues. And there are other costs to consider like toys, items to climb on, and other miscellaneous costs. (Note: these costs can apply to multiple species of pet lizards, not just iguanas)

With a lifespan of about 20 years, they can be great long-time companions. Just be sure to count the costs and make sure that a green iguana is really the right pet choice for you.

#8 Savannah Monitors

The Savannah Monitor is incredibly easy to tame, which gives beginners the fun of a larger reptile without the stress of controlling it. It will need a large habitat with the ability to dig, as it loves to burrow in the dirt. You’d need quite a large enclosure with plenty of dirt for burrowing that won’t cave in on the lizard, affording it the opportunity of hiding its 3-foot-long body.

As fun, as this creature can be, you’ll have to get comfortable with its diet, which is rich with eggs, birds, insects, and most other animals that are within its grasp. Unfortunately, many owners of Savannah monitors feed them diets high in fat (like rodents or canned dog food), which can result in obesity and fatty liver disease, which can greatly shorten their life expectancy.

It’s also very important to seek a reputable breeder to purchase a Savannah monitor from as opposed to buying an imported one, as imported Savannah monitors often suffer trauma and rough conditions that can also negatively affect their life expectancy.

Savannah monitors actually shed their skin periodically, which can show up as flaky dandruff around your home if you let it roam. Prices for a Savannah monitor will run from $25 – $100, but as we discussed earlier, the setup for any pet lizard is going to initially cost you. Proper care can give a pet Savannah monitor up to 20 years with its owner.

#7 Chinese Water Dragons

The Chinese water dragon is native to South China, Vietnam, Thailand, southern China, and Cambodia. In adulthood, Asian water dragons come in shades of green from dark Kelly to light mint, with vertical pale green, mint, aqua, or turquoise stripes. They grow to about 3 feet long. This particular species of water dragon is the easiest to take care of for a novice. They have to take some time to get used to the people around them, but they enjoy being held occasionally.

The 55-gallon terrarium is appropriate for a Chinese water dragon.  Many Chinese water dragon pets don’t understand glass and rub their snouts against it, sometimes damaging their noses and lower jaws.  It’s advisable to consider an enclosure with screened siding instead of glass. They need a UVA/UVB bulb in the terrarium to simulate sunlight for 12 hours a day. Other considerations are objects to climb on, a spot for it to bask in heat and proper humidity. Their main diet consists of crickets, grasshoppers, mealworms, and earthworms , but they also enjoy some fruits or finely shredded green leafy vegetables.

Chinese water dragons usually cost between $50 and $100. With a friendly personality, the main concern with this lizard is its need for the right care , which can help your pet Chinese water dragon live as much as 10-15 years.

#6 Chameleons

Chameleons are rather calm and docile, but the reason that they are so beloved by owners is their ability to change colors, as well as their kooky globular eyes. They won’t need to be handled because of their ability to become stressed, so it may not be the best option for kids that want a more hands-on animal. They may be a little more difficult to care for with their special needs, but they don’t need as much space as some of the larger lizards. Life expectancy can be anywhere from 3 – 10 years.

For housing, chameleons love to climb trees, so it’s good to have a terrarium that is vertically tall, with plenty of objects to climb high on. A cage with a length and width that are 3×3 and a height of 4 feet would work well. You’ll need to research the correct temperatures for your particular breed for basking spots and the general climate. And chameleons drink water droplets from leaves–not from a dish. So you’ll need to either mist the enclosure two times a day or have a drip system installed.

Chameleons catch crickets, mealworms, super worms, wax worms, wax moths, and roaches with their ballistic tongues, but they’ll eat small amounts of leafy greens or fruits at times. They need vitamin supplements, as they are prone to calcium and Vitamin A deficiency. Chameleons range from $30 – $300. We recommend going with a breeder for any type of lizard, as you can better trust that you are getting a healthy pet from the start.

#5 Green Basilisk

If you want a little entertainment from your reptile, the green basilisk is the way to go. With the right traction and speed, they can walk on water. This unique talent is the reason that the green basilisk is known as the “Jesus Christ lizard.” The green basilisk comes from Central America and tropical rainforests in Honduras, Costa Rica, Panama, and Nicaragua.

Its body is covered in bright green scales, with a belly that can have white, gray, or light blue markings. While many reptile enthusiasts love its coloring and energy, they can be difficult to care for.

Keeping green basilisks as pets can be challenging due to their size, their need for a roomy, water-based habitat, and their difficulty in being handled. Nevertheless, when provided with appropriate housing, they can serve as an impressive exhibit species. With adequate attention, a green basilisk has the potential to live for as long as 15 years.

If you’re interested in owning more than one, they can be rather territorial. Two females can get along, and two males can get into fights, but a male and female are not advisable unless they are mating. The temperament of the green basilisk is not the most charming of reptilian pets. When they feel threatened, they’ll puff out their necks and snarl, can bite, and are generally nervous and temperamental.

They don’t require much care to be kept safe and healthy, and though they can stretch to 3 feet long, the majority of that length is in their tail.

#4 Black and White Tegus

The beautiful black and white tegu , a South American species, can grow to be nearly 4-5 feet long and is characterized by gorgeous beaded black and white scales, arranged in intricate patterns. They tend to be incredibly friendly once they learn to trust their owners, and can be loyal companions . They become incredibly attached, leading them to follow their human around the house. Like several other reptiles on this list, these lizards have a projected lifespan of 15-20 years.

Black and white tegus for sale are more challenging to locate than some other species, so you’ll need to find a reputable breeder.  A hatchling typically runs $200.  As with other popular lizard pets, your B&W tegu will need plenty of room in its enclosure, with measurements from 6x3x3 feet to 8x4x3 feet for larger ones.  You’ll need suitable accessories for climbing, a basking spot with a UVA/UVB bulb that can get up to 100-110 degrees Fahrenheit, and temps from 90-95 degrees and cooler spots of 75-80 degrees. 

Tegus also need 75-90% humidity in their enclosures to thrive, so you’ll need a system in place to take care of that.  They like to burrow in substrate, so 4 inches in depth would be good, but it’s recommended to avoid pine or cedar, which can cause dust which is damaging to their lungs.

Its diet should vary for maximum health–don’t rely solely on frozen/thawed rodents or lean meat.  You should mix in fish, eggs, fruit, and veggies.  Many tegus turn their noses up (or should we say snouts) to vegetables, so you should chop them fine and mix them in with other ingredients these lizards favor.

The African fire skink is easily one of the most popular types of skinks to adopt as a pet, primarily due to the beautiful red markings. It works well for beginners with their low-maintenance needs, but they aren’t really meant for handling. More so, they can be admired from outside of their habitat, watching as they move around and enjoy their surroundings. As an added benefit, this particular skink isn’t really prone to many health issues, making them easier to care for.

If you want a reptile that likes the company of other reptiles, the Gidgee skink is a good option. Though they are quite large at 10 inches long, they like to live with a partner to bring out their social side. With a little patience, they become quite easy to handle.

For a more docile reptile that is more prepared for handling, consider the blue-tongue skink. It only weighs about 4 pounds, stretching to 20 inches long. They are often considered a great choice for beginners and for kids.

Skink lizards have a diet that mostly consists of insects. All three of the species we’ve mentioned are omnivorous, so they should have diets that are balanced between insects (they prefer live ones like flies, crickets, roaches, millipedes, centipedes, beetles, grasshoppers, worms, slugs, mosquitos, or snails), and vegetables such as carrots, collard greens, dandelion greens, cabbage, green beans, arugula, squash, or pumpkin. While a little banana, papaya, or berries would be okay for fruit, citrus fruits can kill a skink.

Skinks prefer burrowing to climbing, so their enclosure, which should range from 40 gallons – 55 gallons in size. They enjoy hideouts, so look for ones made of Cork bark, wood, rocks, or other reptile-friendly materials. They will need heated bulbs, and bedding can be cypress mulch, aspen wood shavings, or newspaper. Skinks are prone to blockages, so make sure yours is not eating the particular wood you may be trying.

A blue-tongue skink can run from $150-$500; an African fire skink can range from $40-$50; and a gidgee skink is the most expensive variety, costing between $500-$2000!

Geckos are a little smaller than other pet reptiles , but they come in many varieties. The leopard gecko , for example, is one of the most popular options. Their skin can come in a variety of morphs, but the common colorings are yellow, white, or black spotted. They are fairly easy to handle and don’t often bite, but they get much of their notoriety from the sounds that they make. They also communicate with tail movements. Leopard geckos can be held, but are not affectionate or playful, per se. Leopard geckos only grow to be about 8 inches long, reaching their full maturity at about 1 year old.

As leopard geckos are nocturnal, they don’t need as much UVA/UVB light as other lizard species–2%-7% light can help keep them healthy.  A 10-20 gallon aquarium or enclosure will work, depending on it you want just one gecko or more. You can add hideouts, branches and plants, and a watering area, as geckos drink a lot of water. For feeding, leopard geckos eat live crickets, silkworms, roaches, mealworms, waxworms, and super worms.  You should also include some fresh greens in their diet.  Pet leopard geckos typically run $30 to $100, but can cost as much as $3000! It’s best to seek a breeder to be assured your leopard gecko is healthy.

The African fat-tailed gecko, on the other hand, comes from West Africa . They have the innate ability to withstand their time in captivity rather well and could live well past 20 years if you give them the right care. They are one of the easiest to take care of with any skill level, much like the crested gecko , the gold-dust day gecko, and others.

#1 Bearded Dragons

One of the best pet lizards for beginners and experienced handlers alike is the bearded dragon . It is one of the easiest pets to find in stores and with breeders because they are among the easiest to take care of and are quite friendly and playful. With the right training and exposure, they can even walk on a leash as they get a little social time with their owners. They are well-behaved and sweet, living to be about 15 years old with the right care. Bearded dragons are also very attractive lizards, coming in multiple color options like white, yellow, purple, and red. They come in interesting morphs as well. Another interesting fact is that, unlike most reptile pets, the bearded dragon is odorless, which is a definite plus when housing it indoors. The average cost of one is $25-$75.

One thing to be aware of with bearded dragons or many other reptile species is that they can carry salmonella in their skin. When handling one, you should wash your hands before and after to protect them from germs as well as yourself.

Like many other pet lizard varieties, the bearded dragon will need a roomy terrarium, a basking spot heated up to 100 degrees Fahrenheit, and cooler areas at around 75-80 degrees. A sandy substrate will work, with accessories like rocks, vegetation, and other things to hide in or sit on. They feed on live insects, mostly crickets, but also mealworms and king worms. Appropriate vegetables would be sweet potato and leafy greens like kale or parsley.

What Lizard is Most Like a Dog?

Are you wanting a good cuddle buddy but don’t love the hair and cleanup that comes along with it? Are you wanting a pet that will turn heads as you carry it in your designer purse? Or are you tired of woofs and yips that annoy you and your neighbors?

Well, the Tegus lizard is a great option for you! You can enjoy training these smart reptiles to do things like play fetch and to come when they are called. These scaly little guys even have been known to enjoy a pet now and then. If the weather is nice out (and you do not mind a few odd looks from passersby), its perfectly reasonable for you to put your Tegus on a leash and take a stroll down the block; however, you may have to slow your pace!

Summary Of The Top 10 Best Lizards To Keep As Pets

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COMMENTS

  1. Going on Vacation With (and Without) Your Geckos

    There are 3 aspects of care to consider for all geckos: food, hydration and habitat management. Many older juveniles and adult geckos can go without food for 10 days to 2 weeks, though this is not ideal under normal circumstances. All geckos require more consistent hydration. Geckos that have humidity, temperature and lighting needs that differ ...

  2. Gecko Alone While On Vacation? [7 Things To Check]

    1. For vacations over the weekend, it is best to leave the gecko without surveillance, given that it has adequately eaten and tank conditions are kept within accepted ranges. 2. Extended absences should have someone, either an acquaintance or a professional, perform the care as long as they are well-equipped to do so.

  3. How to Travel with a Leopard Gecko (8 Easy Steps)

    Step 3: Travel carrier familiarity. Purchase your travel container or carrier at least one week before leaving for your trip. You need to provide enough time for your Leopard Gecko to familiarize themselves with the carrier before leaving. Incorporate a couple of minutes of travel carrier time into your Leopard Geckos' regular schedule.

  4. 10 Best Leopard Gecko Carriers for Safe Travel: A Comprehensive Review

    Zoo Med ReptiBreeze Open Air Screen Cage. The Zoo Med ReptiBreeze Open Air Screen Cage offers a spacious and breathable environment for your leopard gecko to travel in. It comes in varying sizes, with the small 16x16x20 inch size being the most suitable for transport. The lightweight mesh material allows for ample ventilation, reducing any ...

  5. How to Travel In a Car With Your Gecko? [6 Dos and 2 Don'ts]

    Geckos don't need heating and/or cooling materials while traveling by car unless the car temperatures are below 65°F (18°C) or above 90°F (32°C). Most often, a normal ambient temperature of about 75°F (24°C) in your car is safe for geckos. You can't exactly bring all their heating equipment in the car to make sure they're comfortable.

  6. Custom Gecko Cages

    Custom Cages builds furniture-quality enclosures for any type of gecko. And with our long list of customizable options, you can truly make this gecko enclosure your own. The most popular design for our gecko enclosures is the Hybrid® Reptile Tank. Some of our customizable options include: Enclosure size. Materials. Equipment for climate control.

  7. How to Travel With a Leopard Gecko 13 Helpful Tips

    Table of Contents. How to Travel With a Leopard Gecko. How To Transport A Leopard Gecko. Step 1: Choose A Travel Carrier. Step 2: Familiarize Your Gecko With Their Travel Carrier. Step 3: Line The Bottom. Step 4: Monitor Temps. Step 5: Pack All Of The Essentials. Step 6: Secure Their Carrier.

  8. Amazon.com: Crested Gecko Cage

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  9. Leopard Gecko Cage Setup: Leopard Gecko Tank Setup

    Leopard geckos require a spacious cage for movement and exploration. To maintain the ideal temperature of 88-92°F, a heat source like an under-tank heater or heat lamp is necessary. Providing humid hide boxes for security and moist hides for shedding is essential.

  10. Best Leopard Gecko Tanks, Enclosures, Terrarium, and Cages

    Easy to assemble (No tools required) 3 years warranty. The PVC Panel Reptile Enclosure by Zen Habitats is the perfect enclosure for leopard geckos and many other reptiles that requires a high humidity environment. This enclosure measures 4'x2'x2', which is three times larger than a 40-gallon breeder tank.

  11. Leopard Gecko Cage Setup

    Choosing the Right Cage for Your Leopard Gecko. Leopard geckos are fascinating reptiles that make great pets. To ensure their well-being and happiness, it's crucial to provide them with a suitable cage. In this section, we will discuss the important factors to consider when choosing the right cage for your leopard gecko.

  12. How To Travel With A Leopard Gecko: Everything You Need To Know

    How To Transport A Leopard Gecko. Step 1: Choose A Travel Carrier. Step 2: Familiarize Your Gecko With Their Travel Carrier. Step 3: Secure The Carrier. Step 4: Line The Bottom. Step 5: Monitor Temps. Step 6: Pack All Of The Essentials. Step 7: Be Mindful Of Stimulus. Step 8: Minimize Stops.

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    Crochet PDF Patterns set 4 in 1 Sugar glider cage set/ Rat cage set/ Hamster hideout set/ Rat hammock set/ Gecko cage set (2.5k) Sale Price $3.60 $ 3.60 $ 11.99 Original Price $11.99 (70% off ... Travel Hammock for Bearded Dragon and Leopard Gecko | Reptile Hammock (645) $ 18.22. Add to Favorites ...

  14. Crested Gecko Cage Setup

    Thank you for watching!!Here are links to view all the products we saw in this video. Exo Terra 12x12x18 Cagehttp://amzn.to/2nl4lz2For more than one gecko, u...

  15. 6 Best Leopard Gecko Setup Ideas

    Leopard Gecko Tank Setup 2: Plants. Numerous plants, rocky outcrops, bushes, and rocks are present in a leopard gecko's native habitat to help them blend into its surroundings and give cover. They will feel more at ease and secure in their tank if decorated. A fantastic enhancement to a leopard gecko's habitat is live plants.

  16. Reptile Enclosures

    Shop great deals on PetSmart's reptile tanks, cages, and terrariums. Find the best habitat for your pet bearded dragon, geckos, snakes, turtles, and more.

  17. 6 Best Crested Gecko Terrariums, Cages, Tanks and Enclosures

    Below are detailed reviews of the best terrariums for crested geckos. The reviews are based on our personal use of the tanks and customer feedback on official websites. 1. Best Overall: 2'x2'x2′ PVC Panel Reptile Enclosure. Zen Habitats is a US-based company that specializes in manufacturing reptile enclosures.

  18. Making a Temporary and/or Travel Cage

    Gecko Forums. Leopard Gecko Forum. Housing . Making a Temporary and/or Travel Cage. Thread ... . Making a Temporary and/or Travel Cage. Thread starter pucki513; Start date Nov 7, 2012; Nov 7, 2012 #1 P. pucki513 New Member. Messages 16 Location Virginia ...

  19. Leopard Gecko Cage: How to Setup the Perfect Gecko Habitat

    Leopard gecko is animal that likes to spend its life on the ground and rarely climb, so the cage should be long and wide instead of tall and narrow. For a single gecko, you can use at least a 10 gallons terrarium. When you want to add a gecko or two, make the tank extra bigger by 5 to 10 gallons. Housing a lizard should be no more than three ...

  20. Leopard Gecko Travel Cage

    The size of the cage is important, as the leopard gecko needs room to move around. The cage should also be tall enough that the leopard gecko can climb to the top and bask in the sun. Additionally, the cage should have a secure lid to prevent the leopard gecko from escaping. One option for a travel cage for a leopard gecko is a plastic storage ...

  21. How to SAFELY Travel with Pet Lizards in a Car [Ultimate Guide]

    Transport your lizard in a sturdy, secure and well ventilated container. Line the bottom of the carrier with a grippy material. Warm the carrier if necessary. Get your reptile used to it's travel container. Pack all the essentials. Secure your lizard's container in your car. Try to keep stops to a minimum.

  22. Is it safe for a gecko to travel in a portable cage? : r/geckos

    So would it be safe to travel with a gecko in a portable cage. Note: safe for the gecko Archived post. New comments cannot be posted and votes cannot be cast. Share Sort by: ... If I was still going to use the travel cage, I would have to use a heat mat like I've done in the past. For the travel cage, I make sure he has his favorite hide (It's ...

  23. Can I Leave My Leopard Gecko Alone For A Week

    A travel cage for a leopard gecko is a small, lightweight enclosure that can be easily carried when traveling. The cage should be big enough for the gecko to move around and turn around comfortably, but not so big that it is cumbersome to carry. Some travel cages have removable top panels so that the gecko can be easily removed for cleaning or ...

  24. The 10 Best Lizards To Keep As Pets

    As leopard geckos are nocturnal, they don't need as much UVA/UVB light as other lizard species-2%-7% light can help keep them healthy. A 10-20 gallon aquarium or enclosure will work, depending ...