Your Guide to Well-Baby Visits

Medical review policy, latest update:, what are well-baby visits and why are they so important, when will my child's well-baby visits happen, read this next, what you can expect at well-baby visits, tips on making the most of well-baby visits, time it right, make a checklist, write down your questions, have some answers, too, dress baby for success.

What to Expect the First Year , 3rd edition, Heidi Murkoff. WhatToExpect.com,  Your Baby's Vaccine Schedule: What Shots Should Your Child Get When? , January 2021. American Academy of Pediatrics, AAP Schedule of Well-Child Care Visits , September 2021. American Academy of Pediatrics, Checkup Checklist: 1 Month Old , September 2021. KidsHealth From Nemours,  Your Child's Checkup: 1 Month , April 2021.

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What to Expect At A Well Child Visit

Going to the doctor with your new baby may feel scary—but we’re here to help! Here’s what to expect at a well child visit (plus, a checklist of everything to bring along).

What is an early well child visit?

It’s early check-in with your baby’s pediatrician to make sure they are healthy and seeing all signs of typical development. It is a great place to ask questions, detect and treat any delays, and help parents feel best prepared to care for their child.

A baby at his first well child visit

When should a well-baby visit take place?

First and foremost, follow the instructions of your doctor. They will let you know when visits should take place for your baby.

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that most babies have their first doctor visit when they are 3 to 5 days old. After that, the AAP recommends well-baby visits in the first year at 1, 2, 4, 6, 9, and 12 months. See the list of check-in ages here .

What should you plan to discuss?

The doctor will be checking in on your child’s health, development, and overall well-being. Therefore, doctors will ask questions about their development and functioning.

  • They will make sure baby is doing activities such as Tummy Time , remaining calm during diaper changes, etc.
  • They will make sure baby is sleeping safely and getting enough sleep .
  • They will check in on your child’s motor function .
  • They will ask about your child’s feeding
  • They may ask you if you’ve noticed any delays or issues in your child’s day-to-day activities. You can always visit our age pages to read about the milestones and abilities your child should reach- -and any signs of delay. If there’s something you want to bring to your child’s healthcare provider sooner than their next well-child visit, you can make an appointment at any time.
  • They will be checking in on you as well, to make sure you’re informed on how to best care for your baby, so don’t be afraid to ask them questions about your baby’s care.

An well-baby visit can ensure your baby is growing and developing typically

Remember that early intervention is key to prevention of further delays and complications—so it is always best to tell the doctor if you’ve seen anything concerning, or if your child is having trouble reaching a certain milestone. If something seems delayed or if you think your child might need extra help, trust your instincts and ask your doctor for their input!

Watch this video to learn more!

Your well-baby visit checklist

Before the visit:.

  • Print out and review the Pathways.org Ability and Milestone Checklists . Check your baby to see if they are meeting their developmental milestones.
  • If there are any that they are not meeting, just make a note of it! Just be sure to ask your doctor about it at the visit.
  • Speak to any caregivers for your baby to see if they have noticed anything in your child that should be brought up to the doctor.

1 year well baby visit

For the visit:

  • Your baby needs to be there, as well as at least 1 parent. Your doctor will have questions about how your baby is doing, so it’s recommended that the parent present can accurately answer those questions.
  • Bring your checklists with in case any questions come up about their abilities and milestones.
  • Bring a pen and notebook, to write down any important information.
  • Write down any questions you may have and bring them with the doctor.

Want to learn more about baby’s development and track their milestones?

Download the free pathways.org baby milestones app .

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  • Well-Child Visit Handouts

Parent and patient handouts from the Bright Futures Tool and Resource Kit , 2nd Edition, address key information for health supervision care from infancy through adolescence. Bright Futures is a national health care promotion and disease prevention initiative that uses a developmentally based approach to address children’s health care needs in the context of family and community.

See Handouts by Language for well-child visit handouts up to 2 years of age translated into Arabic, Bengali, Chinese, French, Haitian Creole, Hmong, Korean, Polish, Portuguese, Russian, Somali, and Vietnamese.

NEW! September 2022: Bright Futures: Health Equity Resources for Health Care Professionals This compendium of resources was created for pediatric health care professionals to address the impact of racism, bias, and discrimination on the health and well-being of their patients and families.

Handouts are accessible with a subscription. For more information about a subscription, please e-mail [email protected] )

1 year well baby visit

Parent Handouts

Bright Futures Parent Handout: First Week Visit (3 to 5 Days) English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Parent Handout: 1 Month Visit English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Parent Handout: 2 Month Visit English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Parent Handout: 4 Month Visit English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Parent Handout: 6 Month Visit English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Parent Handout: 9 Month Visit English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Parent Handout: 12 Month Visit English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Parent Handout: 15 Month Visit English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Parent Handout: 18 Month Visit English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Parent Handout: 2 Year Visit English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Parent Handout: 2½ Year Visit English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Parent Handout: 3 Year Visit English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Parent Handout: 4 Year Visit English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Parent Handout: 5 and 6 Year Visits English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Parent Handout: 7 and 8 Year Visits English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Parent Handout: 9 and 10 Year Visits English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Parent Handout: 11-14 Year Visits English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Parent Handout: 15-17 Year Visits English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Patient Handouts

Bright Futures Patient Handout: 7 and 8 Year Visits English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Patient Handout: 9 and 10 Year Visits English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Patient Handout: 11-14 Year Visits   English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Patient Handout: 15-17 Year Visits English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

Bright Futures Patient Handout: 18-21 Year Visits English PDF    |    Spanish PDF

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What to Expect at Well-Child Visits

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Well-child visit schedule.

  • Newborn Well-Child Visit
  • Baby Well-Child Visits

1-Month Well-Child Visit

2-month well-child visit, 4-month well-child visit, 6-month well-child visit, 9-month well-child visit, 12-month well-child visit, toddler well-child visits, 15-month well-child visit, 18-month well-child visit, 24-month well-child visit, 30-month well-child visit, 3-year well-child visit.

  • Vaccines Schedule From 0-2 Years

While it’s a no-brainer that you take your baby or toddler to the doctor when they’re sick, it’s also important to bring your child to the pediatrician for regularly scheduled visits when they are feeling just fine! Enter: The well-child visit. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that each kiddo goes to the doctor within days of birth, then almost monthly, then annually for must-have screenings and assessments. Here’s what to expect at childhood checkups—and when to expect them .

In the first few years of life, you’ll get to know your child’s healthcare provider very well.

Typical child well visit schedule:

  • Within 3 to 5 days of birth
  • Annually after 3 years

What to Expect at the Newborn Well-Child Visit

Congrats! You just brought your baby home from the hospital…now pack up the diaper bag and head to their very first visit to the pediatrician! (Still haven’t secured your baby’s pediatrician? Use our guide to help you find the perfect doc .) All newborns need a first-week checkup within 3 to 5 days from birth.

What to bring to Newborn Well-Child Visit

Beyond your sweet babe, you may need to bring all your hospital paperwork, which should contain info about your baby’s discharge weight and/or any possible complications that occurred during pregnancy or birth. Some hospitals and practices use online charts that multiple providers can access, but if yours doesn’t, you’ll want to have that information on hand. (If you’re unsure, just ask!)

Newborn Well-Child Visit Vaccines

If your little one did not receive the Hepatitis B (HepB) vaccine while at the hospital, they should receive the first HepB vaccine dose now.

Newborn Well-Child Visit Screenings

Your baby’s pediatrician will likely tackle the following screening measure and exams:

Your baby will be measured and weighed to ensure they’re growing as expected.

Baby’s head, ears, eyes, and mouth will be examined.

Baby’s skin will be looked at for birthmarks or rashes.

The doctor will review the results of two newborn screenings your baby received shortly after birth: hearing and blood test results. (Rescreening may be done.)

If your baby did not have their hearing screened at the hospital—or if they were born at home or a birthing center, their hearing will be screened .

The pediatrician will press gently on your baby’s tummy to check organs and for an umbilical hernia.

They’ll also move your baby’s legs to check for dislocation or other issues with their hip joints.

Your baby’s genitalia will be examined for signs of infection, such as tenderness or lumps.

What to Expect at Baby Well-Child Visits

During the first year of your baby’s life, they will visit the pediatrician every month or so for a well-child checkup. All first-year well-visits entail the following:

Baby’s weight and height will be recorded.

The pediatrician will check on your baby’s developmental milestones.

Baby’s heart rate and breathing will be checked.

The doctor will examine your baby’s skin.

They’ll also press on Baby’s belly to detect enlarged organs or an umbilical hernia.

Baby’s legs and hips will be checked for dislocation or other joint problems.

Baby’s genitalia will be inspected for signs of infection.

Beyond the screenings listed above, you can also expect:

Your little one may receive the HepB vaccine, though sometimes this occurs at Baby’s two-month checkup.

Mom will be screened for postpartum depression. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends moms be screened for postpartum depression (PPD) during well-child visits at 1, 2, 4, and 6 months of age.

If your baby is breastfeeding or consuming less than 27 ounces a day of vitamin-D containing baby formula, the pediatrician will offer advice about vitamin D supplementation .

Possible questions about feeding, sleep, number of wet and dirty diapers, and other 1-month milestones

Beyond the screenings listed above, you can expect:

Baby is set to receive the following vaccinations: RV, DTap, Hib, PCV13, and IPV.

Mom will be screened for postpartum depression .

Possible questions about feeding, sleep, number of wet and dirty diapers, tummy time , and other 2-month milestones

Your bub will likely receive the following vaccinations: RV, DTap, Hib, PCV13, and IPV.

Mom will be screened for postpartum depression.

Blood may be drawn to screen for anemia , which is a condition marked by a low supply of healthy red blood cells.

If your baby is partially or completely breastfed, the doctor will offer advice about introducing an iron supplement . 

Possible questions about sleep regression , babbling, Baby’s gums, teething, starting solids soon, when/how to introduce allergens , and other 4-month milestones

Your baby will likely get the following vaccinations: DTap, Hib, and PCV13. If your bub received the PedvaxHIB vaccine, they don’t require a 6-month Hib shot. If your Baby received the RotaTeq (RV5) vaccine, they’ll get their third dose now.

If your baby’s 6-month well-visit falls during flu season, they should get the recommended flu shot —with the second dose four weeks later. If it’s not flu season, your pediatrician will advise you when to return to get this important vaccine.

Fluoride varnish may be applied if your bub’s first tooth has popped through (most babies start cutting teeth around this age).

Possible questions about starting solids, introducing nuts , teething, and sleep, and other 6-month baby milestones

If your baby hasn’t yet received their third HepB and IPV shots, they may get them now. Technically, babies can get either of these vaccines between 6 and 18 months, and many doctors opt to give them during the 9-month checkup.

Your baby’s pediatrician will conduct a more formal developmental screening than usual, asking several questions about your little one’s growth and behavior. The doc may even ask if they can observe you and your little one playing together. All of this is to see whether your baby is developing at an expected rate or further testing is needed.

Possible questions about pointing, babyproofing , sippy cups, constipation, and other 9-month baby milestones

Baby will likely receive the following vaccinations: Hib, PCV13, MMR, VAR, HepA (second dose around 6 months later). Your little is eligible for all these vaccines at their one-year checkup, but that doesn’t mean they’ll occur all at once. For example, babies should receive Hib, PCV13, MMR, VAR vaccines between 12 and 15 months. And you have until 23 months to tick the HepA shot off your list.

Your baby may be screened for anemia .

Based on your little one’s risk, their hearing, vision, blood pressure, and/or their blood lead levels may be tested.

Possible questions about crawling, walking, talking, transitioning to whole milk , and other first-year baby milestones

During Baby’s first year, doctor appointments were coming at you in rapid succession. But now that you’ve got a toddler on your hands, the time between well-visits widens. Between 15 months old and your bub’s third birthday, you’ll be back at the pediatrician’s office just five times for checkups. Here’s what you can expect at every well visit: 

Your toddler’s weight and height will be recorded.

The pediatrician will check on your tot’s developmental milestones.

Your toddler’s head, ears, eyes, and mouth will be examined.

Toddler’s heart rate and breathing will be checked.

A skin examination will likely occur.

The doctor will press on your child’s belly to feel organs and for an umbilical hernia.

Your toddler's genitalia will be looked at for signs of infection, such as tenderness or lumps.

Depending on which vaccines your child got at their 12-month visit, they may be due for Hib, PCV13, MMR, VAR, which are all recommended between 12 and 15 months.

Your toddler may be checked for anemia.

Based on specific risk factors, your toddler may have their vision, hearing, and/or blood pressure checked, too.

If your tot has already received a fluoride varnish on their teeth, a second application may occur .

Possible questions about sleep, motor skills, social skills, eating, talking, and constipation, and other 15-month milestones

Depending on which immunizations your kiddo got during their last well visit, they may be due for HepA with a second dose about 6 months later and/or DTap

Based on your child’s risk factors—or possible concerns—your tot’s pediatrician may screen for anemia or lead poisoning, do a blood pressure check, and/or conduct a hearing or vision test.

In addition to regular developmental surveillance and screening, all 18-month-olds need a formal screening for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) at their well-child visit. There are several screening tool options, but the 23-point questionnaire called the Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers–Revised with follow-u (M-CHAT-R/F) is the most common screening tool used in pediatric offices.

Possible questions about sleep, eating, motor skills, play habits, potty training, tantrums, and other 18-month milestones

Once your tot is 2 years old, they can get the nasal spray version of the flu shot. (Your toddler is still too young to get their annual jab—or FluMist—at the local pharmacy.)

The AAP recommends all children get screened for autism spectrum disorder at both their 18- and 24-month well-child visits. ( Learn about early autism signs. )

Your child’s doc will likely start using BMI (body mass index) to screen for overweight and obesity in children beginning at 2 years old.

Your child’s doctor may order tests for anemia, lead, high cholesterol, and/or tuberculosis if needed.

Possible questions about sleep, potty training , motor and language development , and other 24-month milestones

Plan for all of the basic well-visit screenings at the 30-month (or two-and-a-half year) checkup. If your toddler is up to date on vaccines and feeling good, not much else happens at this checkup! But just because there’s nothing “big” happening at this well visit, doesn’t mean it’s not important. Remember, these checkups are how doctors track your child’s development. It’s a time to ask questions about your child’s 30-month milestones . And these visits ensure that your toddler is getting the care they need to stay healthy!

While visual acuity screening (seeing details of letters or symbols from a distance) is recommended to begin between the ages 4 and 5, cooperative 3-year-olds can easily be tested, too.

Your child’s blood pressure will be checked.

Again, your child may be checked for anemia, lead, and/or tuberculosis, if needed.

Possible questions about sleep, speech and language development, motor skills, and other 3-year milestones

Well-Child Visit Vaccine Schedule: Birth to 2 Years

The first two years are prime for protecting your child against numerous diseases and infections. Here’s the rundown of the recommended vaccine schedule for your little one’s earliest years:

Vaccines at 1-month checkup: HepB vaccine. Sometimes this occurs at Baby’s two-month checkup, instead.

Vaccines at 2-month checkup: RV, DTap, Hib, PCV13, and IPV

Vaccines at 4-month checkup: RV, DTap, Hib, PCV13, and IPV

Vaccines at 6-month checkup: DTap, Hib, PCV13, flu shot. While all 6-month-olds should receive their annual flu shot, your baby’s 6-month checkup may not occur during flu season. If that’s the case, your baby will receive the vaccine later. Regardless, your child may need a second dose of the flu vaccine four weeks after the first. Also, if your Baby received the RotaTeq, (RV5) vaccine, they’ll get their third dose at 6 months.

Vaccines at 9-month checkup: HepB, IPV (though they can be given as early as 6 months and as late as 18 months)

Vaccines at 12-month checkup: Hib, PCV13, MMR, VAR, HepA (second dose ~6 months later). Your baby is eligible for all these vaccines at their one-year checkup, but that doesn’t mean they will all occur at once. For example, babies should receive Hib, PCV13, MMR, VAR vaccines between 12 and 15 months. And you have until 23 months to tick the HepA shot off your list.

  For a more in-depth look at the recommended vaccine schedule for children, please check out our soup-to-nuts vaccine guide .

  • American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP): 1st Week Checkup Checklist: 3 to 5 days old
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Recommended Vaccinations for Infants and Children, Parent-Friendly Version
  • Nemours Children’s Health: Hearing Tests
  • Incorporating Recognition and Management of Perinatal Depression Into Pediatric Practice, Pediatrics, January 2019
  • AAP: Where We Stand: Vitamin D & Iron Supplements for Babies
  • AAP: Checkup Checklist: 4 Months Old
  • AAP: Checkup Checklist: 6 Months Old
  • AAP: Checkup Checklist: 9 Months Old
  • AAP: Checkup Checklist: First Birthday (12 Months Old)
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): Important Milestones: Your Baby By Fifteen Months
  • AAP: How Pediatricians Screen for Autism
  • National Alliance of State Pharmacy Associations: Pharmacist Administered Vaccines, Updated August 2022, Based on NASPA Analysis of State Pharmacy Practice Laws   
  • CDC: About Child & Teen BMI
  • Nemours Children’s Health: Your Child's Checkup: 2 Years (24 Months)

View more posts tagged, health & safety

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Disclaimer: The information on our site is NOT medical advice for any specific person or condition. It is only meant as general information. If you have any medical questions and concerns about your child or yourself, please contact your health provider.

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1 year well baby visit

Doctor Visits

Make the Most of Your Child’s Visit to the Doctor (Ages 1 to 4 Years)

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Take Action

Young children need to go to the doctor or nurse for a “well-child visit” 7 times between ages 1 and 4.

A well-child visit is when you take your child to the doctor to make sure they’re healthy and developing normally. This is different from other visits for sickness or injury.

At a well-child visit, the doctor or nurse can help catch any problems early, when they may be easier to treat. You’ll also have a chance to ask questions about things like your child’s behavior, eating habits, and sleeping habits.

Learn what to expect so you can make the most of each visit.

Well-Child Visits

How often do i need to take my child for well-child visits.

Young children grow quickly, so they need to visit the doctor or nurse regularly to make sure they’re healthy and developing normally.

Children ages 1 to 4 need to see the doctor or nurse when they’re:

  • 12 months old
  • 15 months old (1 year and 3 months)
  • 18 months old (1 year and 6 months)
  • 24 months old (2 years)
  • 30 months old (2 years and 6 months)
  • 3 years old
  • 4 years old

If you’re worried about your child’s health, don’t wait until the next scheduled visit — call the doctor or nurse right away.

Child Development

How do i know if my child is growing and developing on schedule.

Your child’s doctor or nurse can help you understand how your child is developing and learning to do new things — like walk and talk. These are sometimes called  “developmental milestones.”

Every child grows and develops differently. For example, some children will take longer to start talking than others. Learn more about child development .

At each visit, the doctor or nurse will ask you how you’re doing as a parent and what new things your child is learning to do.

Ages 12 to 18 Months

By age 12 months, most kids:.

  • Stand by holding on to something
  • Walk with help, like by holding on to the furniture
  • Call a parent "mama," "dada," or some other special name
  • Look for a toy they've seen you hide

Check out this complete list of milestones for kids age 12 months .

By age 15 months, most kids:

  • Follow simple directions, like "Pick up the toy"
  • Show you a toy they like
  • Try to use things they see you use, like a cup or a book
  • Take a few steps on their own

Check out this complete list of milestones for kids age 15 months.

By age 18 months, most kids:

  • Make scribbles with crayons
  • Look at a few pages in a book with you
  • Try to say 3 or more words besides “mama” or “dada”
  • Point to show someone what they want
  • Walk on their own
  • Try to use a spoon

Check out this complete list of milestones for kids age 18 months . 

Ages 24 to 30 Months

By age 24 months (2 years), most kids:.

  • Notice when others are hurt or upset
  • Point to at least 2 body parts, like their nose, when asked
  • Try to use knobs or buttons on a toy
  • Kick a ball

Check out this complete list of milestones for kids age 24 months . 

By age 30 months, most kids:

  • Name items in a picture book, like a cat or dog
  • Play simple games with other kids, like tag
  • Jump off the ground with both feet
  • Take some clothes off by themselves, like loose pants or an open jacket

Check out this complete list of milestones for kids age 30 months .

Ages 3 to 4 Years

By age 3 years, most kids:.

  • Calm down within 10 minutes after you leave them, like at a child care drop-off
  • Draw a circle after you show them how
  • Ask “who,” “what,” “where,” or “why” questions, like “Where is Daddy?”

Check out this complete list of milestones for kids age 3 years . 

By age 4 years, most kids:

  • Avoid danger — for example, they don’t jump from tall heights at the playground
  • Pretend to be something else during play, like a teacher, superhero, or dog
  • Draw a person with 3 or more body parts
  • Catch a large ball most of the time

Check out this complete list of milestones for kids age 4 years . 

Take these steps to help you and your child get the most out of well-child visits.

Gather important information.

Bring any medical records you have to the appointment, including a record of vaccines (shots) your child has received.

Make a list of any important changes in your child’s life since the last doctor’s visit, like a:

  • New brother or sister
  • Serious illness or death in the family
  • Separation or divorce
  • Change in child care

Use this tool to  keep track of your child’s family health history .

Ask other caregivers about your child.

Before you visit the doctor, talk with others who care for your child, like a grandparent, daycare provider, or babysitter. They may be able to help you think of questions to ask the doctor or nurse.

What about cost?

Under the Affordable Care Act, insurance plans must cover well-child visits. Depending on your insurance plan, you may be able to get well-child visits at no cost to you. Check with your insurance company to find out more.

Your child may also qualify for free or low-cost health insurance through Medicaid or the Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP). Learn about coverage options for your family.

If you don’t have insurance, you may still be able to get free or low-cost well-child visits. Find a health center near you and ask about well-child visits.

To learn more, check out these resources:

  • Free preventive care for children covered by the Affordable Care Act
  • How the Affordable Care Act protects you and your family
  • Understanding your health insurance and how to use it [PDF - 698 KB]

Ask Questions

Make a list of questions you want to ask the doctor..

Before the well-child visit, write down 3 to 5 questions you have. This visit is a great time to ask the doctor or nurse any questions about:

  • A health condition your child has (like asthma or an allergy)
  • Changes in sleeping or eating habits
  • How to help kids in the family get along

Here are some questions you may want to ask:

  • Is my child up to date on vaccines?
  • How can I make sure my child is getting enough physical activity?
  • Is my child at a healthy weight?
  • How can I help my child try different foods?
  • What are appropriate ways to discipline my child?
  • How much screen time is okay for young children?

Take a notepad, smartphone, or tablet and write down the answers so you remember them later.

Ask what to do if your child gets sick. 

Make sure you know how to get in touch with a doctor or nurse when the office is closed. Ask how to get hold of the doctor on call — or if there's a nurse information service you can call at night or during the weekend. 

What to Expect

Know what to expect..

During each well-child visit, the doctor or nurse will ask you questions about your child, do a physical exam, and update your child's medical history. You'll also be able to ask your questions and discuss any problems you may be having.

The doctor or nurse will ask questions about your child.

The doctor or nurse may ask about:

  • Behavior — Does your child have trouble following directions?
  • Health — Does your child often complain of stomachaches or other kinds of pain?
  • Activities — What types of pretend play does your child like?
  • Eating habits — What does your child eat on a normal day?
  • Family — Have there been any changes in your family since your last visit?

They may also ask questions about safety, like:

  • Does your child always ride in a car seat in the back seat of the car? 
  • Does anyone in your home have a gun? If so, is it unloaded and locked in a place where your child can’t get it?
  • Is there a swimming pool or other water around your home?
  • What steps have you taken to childproof your home? Do you have gates on stairs and latches on cabinets?

Your answers to questions like these will help the doctor or nurse make sure your child is healthy, safe, and developing normally.

Physical Exam

The doctor or nurse will also check your child’s body..

To check your child’s body, the doctor or nurse will:

  • Measure your child’s height and weight
  • Check your child’s blood pressure
  • Check your child’s vision
  • Check your child’s body parts (this is called a physical exam)
  • Give your child shots they need

Learn more about your child’s health care:

  • Find out how to get your child’s shots on schedule
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Content last updated February 2, 2024

Reviewer Information

This information on well-child visits was adapted from materials from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Institutes of Health.

Reviewed by: Sara Kinsman, M.D., Ph.D. Director, Division of Child, Adolescent, and Family Health Maternal and Child Health Bureau Health Resources and Services Administration

Bethany Miller, M.S.W. Chief, Adolescent Health Branch Maternal and Child Health Bureau Health Resources and Services Administration

Diane Pilkey, R.N., M.P.H. Nursing Consultant, Division of Child, Adolescent, and Family Health Maternal and Child Health Bureau Health Resources and Services Administration

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KENNETH W. LIN, MD, MPH, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia

Am Fam Physician. 2015;91(6):362-364

More than two-thirds of practicing family physicians report that they provide care for children, 1 and well-child visits provide the best opportunities to deliver evidence-based preventive services. These services include administering immunizations, assessing growth and development, and counseling children and parents about behavioral issues, nutrition, exercise, and prevention of unintentional injury. 2

The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recently updated its recommendations on preventive health care for children, 3 which define a set of services that, under the Affordable Care Act, must be covered by Medicaid and private insurers at no out-of-pocket cost. 4 The current AAP Bright Futures guideline (available at http://www.aap.org/en-us/professional-resources/practice-support/Periodicity/Periodicity%20Schedule_FINAL.pdf ) includes three screening tests that were not recommended for all children in previous versions: autism screening at 18 and 24 months of age, cholesterol screening between nine and 11 years of age, and annual screening for high blood pressure beginning at three years of age.

It should be noted that none of these screening tests are included in the American Academy of Family Physicians' (AAFP's) list of recommended preventive services for children ( Table 1 ) . 5 The AAFP's clinical preventive services recommendations are generally consistent with those of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF). The USPSTF methods for developing recommendations include performing a systematic evidence review of the benefits and harms of a preventive service, and recommending that the service be provided to the general population only after consistent data from high-quality randomized controlled trials or other prospective studies establish that the benefits exceed the harms. 6 This rigorous approach to the development of clinical practice guidelines has been endorsed by the Institute of Medicine. 7 In contrast, few AAP policy statements on well-child care are supported by direct evidence of net health benefit. 8 , 9

The rationale for the AAP's recommendation to routinely screen toddlers for autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) with ASD-specific screening tools is to advance the time of diagnosis and deliver early interventions. 10 Although a systematic review of 40 studies found that a policy of universal screening for ASD increased rates of diagnosis and referral, the effects of such policies on time of diagnosis or enrollment in services are unclear. 11 The entire body of evidence that intensive behavioral interventions improve language skills and cognitive or functional outcomes in children with ASD consists of a single randomized controlled trial and several prospective cohort studies of varying quality. 12 , 13

The AAP recommends measurement of blood pressure and cholesterol levels in children to identify modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease and to provide early interventions to reduce future risk. However, no studies have evaluated whether treating primary hypertension in persons younger than 18 years reduces adverse cardiovascular outcomes in adulthood. 14 , 15 Similarly, evidence is lacking that lowering cholesterol levels with lifestyle changes or medications improves cardiovascular outcomes, and long-term statin use is associated with rare but serious harms. 16 , 17

Time is a precious clinical resource. Clinicians who spend time delivering unproven or ineffective interventions at health maintenance visits risk “crowding out” effective services. For example, a national survey of family and internal medicine physicians regarding adult well-male examination practices found that physicians spent an average of five minutes discussing prostate-specific antigen screening (a service that the AAFP and the USPSTF recommend against because the harms outweigh the benefits 18 ), but one minute or less each on nutrition and smoking cessation counseling. 19 Similarly, family physicians have limited time at well-child visits and therefore should prioritize preventive services that have strong evidence of net benefit.

editor's note: Dr. Lin is associate deputy editor of AFP Online and chair of the Subcommittee on Clinical Practice Guidelines of the AAFP's Commission on the Health of the Public and Science. Because of Dr. Lin's dual roles, two other medical editors independently reviewed this editorial for publication.

Bazemore AW, Makaroff LA, Puffer JC, et al. Declining numbers of family physicians are caring for children. J Am Board Fam Med. 2012;25(2):139-140.

Riley M, Locke AB, Skye EP. Health maintenance in school-aged children: part II. Counseling recommendations. Am Fam Physician. 2011;83(6):689-694.

Simon GR, Baker C, Barden GA, et al. 2014 recommendations for pediatric preventive health care. Pediatrics. 2014;133(3):568-570.

American Academy of Pediatrics. Bright Futures. http://brightfutures.aap.org . Accessed August 20, 2014.

American Academy of Family Physicians. Summary of recommendations for clinical preventive services. July 2014. https://www.aafp.org/dam/AAFP/documents/patient_care/clinical_recommendations/cps-recommendations.pdf . Accessed August 20, 2014.

Melnyk BM, Grossman DC, Chou R, et al. USPSTF perspective on evidence-based preventive recommendations for children. Pediatrics. 2012;130(2):e399-e407.

Graham R, Mancher M, Wolman DM, et al., eds. Clinical Practice Guidelines We Can Trust . Washington, DC: The National Academies Press; 2011.

Moyer VA, Butler M. Gaps in the evidence for well-child care: a challenge to our profession. Pediatrics. 2004;114(6):1511-1521.

Belamarich PF, Gandica R, Stein RE, Racine AD. Drowning in a sea of advice: pediatricians and American Academy of Pediatrics policy statements. Pediatrics. 2006;118(4):e964-e978.

Johnson CP, Myers SM American Academy of Pediatrics Council on Children with Disabilities. Identification and evaluation of children with autism spectrum disorders. Pediatrics. 2007;120(5):1183-1215.

Daniels AM, Halladay AK, Shih A, et al. Approaches to enhancing the early detection of autism spectrum disorders. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2014;53(2):141-152.

Warren Z, McPheeters ML, Sathe N, et al. A systematic review of early intensive intervention for autism spectrum disorders. Pediatrics. 2011;127(5):e1303-e1311.

Reichow B, Barton EE, Boyd BA, Hume K. Early intensive behavioral intervention (EBI) for young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2012;10:CD009260.

Chiolero A, Bovet P, Paradis G. Screening for elevated blood pressure in children and adolescents: a critical appraisal. JAMA Pediatr. 2013;167(3):266-273.

Thompson M, Dana T, Bougatsos C, Blazina I, Norris SL. Screening for hypertension in children and adolescents to prevent cardiovascular disease. Pediatrics. 2013;131(3):490-525.

Grossman DC, Moyer VA, Melnyk BM, Chou R, DeWitt TG U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. The anatomy of a U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation: lipid screening for children and adolescents. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2011;165(3):205-210.

Psaty BM, Rivara FP. Universal screening and drug treatment of dyslipidemia in children and adolescents. JAMA. 2012;307(3):257-258.

Moyer VA U.S. Preventive Services Task Force. Screening for prostate cancer: U.S. Preventive Service Task Force recommendation statement. Ann Intern Med. 2012;157(2):120-134.

Pollack KI, Krause KM, Yarnall KS, Gradison M, Michener JL, Østbye T. Estimated time spent on preventive services by primary care physicians. BMC Health Serv Res. 2008;8:245.

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This content is owned by the AAFP. A person viewing it online may make one printout of the material and may use that printout only for his or her personal, non-commercial reference. This material may not otherwise be downloaded, copied, printed, stored, transmitted or reproduced in any medium, whether now known or later invented, except as authorized in writing by the AAFP.  See permissions  for copyright questions and/or permission requests.

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5 Smart Ways To Prevent Cavities in Kids

Once your baby's first tooth comes in, it's time to take them to the dentist. That first visit is the first step in preventing childhood cavities and maintaining dental health.

  • Causes of Cavities in Kids
  • When To See a Dentist

How to Prevent Cavities

Dental health at every age.

Parents often assume that kids get cavities because they're lax about brushing and flossing. That's true to an extent, but what few people know is that tooth decay, also known as "dental caries," is caused by specific germs, spreads easily within families, and can last a lifetime.

Dental caries is one of the most common health problems in young children. In fact, about 42% of children aged 2 to 11 have had dental caries affecting primary teeth, according to The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research.

Here’s what you need to know about cavities in babies, toddlers, and children.

What Causes Cavities in Toddlers and Children?

Tooth decay begins with a group of germs called mutans streptococcus . "The bacteria feed on sugar and produce acid that eats away at the structure of teeth by depleting [minerals]," explains Burton Edelstein, DDS, founding director of the Children's Dental Health Project. The bacteria also create plaque, a yellowish film that builds up on teeth and contains even more enamel-eroding acid. Once an area without minerals becomes big enough, the tooth's surface collapses. Over time, a cavity forms.

Babies are born without any of these harmful bacteria in their mouths, and studies have shown that the parent or caregiver with the most frequent interaction with their baby typically infects their child before age 2. It happens when you transfer your saliva into your child's mouth by repeatedly eating from the same spoon as your baby, for example, letting your toddler brush their teeth with your toothbrush, or even kissing on the lips. And if you've frequently had cavities yourself, you're even more likely to pass the germs along.

Once a child's mouth has become colonized with this bacteria, they'll be prone to cavities in their baby and permanent teeth that can cause pain and difficulty eating. "It's an old wives' tale that 'soft teeth' run in families, but what's really passed along in families are high levels of decay-causing bacteria," says Dr. Edelstein. The key role that bacteria plays in decay may also explain why some kids who eat tons of candy or never floss are lucky enough to avoid dental problems.

Whether or not you've had trouble with your teeth, you need to take responsibility for your child's dental health—just like you'd be vigilant if you've had a family history of high cholesterol or skin cancer.

That's why the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) urges pediatricians to ask parents about their own dental history and to recommend taking extra precautions if a child is at high risk for dental caries. They also recommend that every child has a dental home by age 1.

When Should My Child See a Dentist?

Your child should see a dentist by their first birthday or within six months of their first tooth coming in, according to recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry Association (AAPD) and the AAP. If you wait until your child is older, decay can be well underway: About 28% of 2- to 5-year-olds have cavities in primary teeth, according to The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research.

However, most parents don't know they should make a dentist appointment for their baby. "Not all pediatricians look out for a toddler's oral health, and some doctors don't even look at the teeth," says Paul Casamassimo, DDS, professor of pediatric dentistry at the Ohio State University College of Medicine and Public Health in Columbus.

But it's important to treat cavities in baby teeth: These first teeth serve as space holders for permanent teeth, so losing one prematurely can cause alignment problems that must be corrected with braces later.

Although you may worry that your little one will never sit still and open their mouth, the first dental visit will be quick. The dentist can easily spot the telltale plaque buildup along the top gum line, which is a sign of cavity-causing bacteria, and they can do a culture to check for harmful bacteria (in you and your child).

A crucial way to help limit cavities—regardless of whether they run in your family—is to diligently brush and floss, which physically pushes bacteria, plaque, and sugar off the teeth. Fluoride is an essential part of dental health because it not only restores calcium to decaying teeth but also limits the production of corrosive acid.

Even though some kids are at a much higher risk of developing childhood cavities, all children can get them. So, it's important for everyone to follow this road map for dental health.

Reduce sugar consumption

Limiting sugar—which bacteria need to survive—is the number-one way to prevent cavities. It's actually the frequency, not the total quantity of sugar consumption, that matters most, says Dr. Edelstein.

For example, drinking a cup of juice with morning snack is less harmful to the teeth than sipping that juice all day. That's because repeatedly exposing the teeth to sugar prevents saliva, the body's natural tooth cleanser, from doing its job. Juice and candy aren't the only offenders: Starchy carbohydrates like crackers and cereal and sticky foods such as raisins can also promote decay.

Avoid sugary drinks

Fruit juice (even diluted) and breast milk and formula bathe the teeth in sugar, says Ronald Kosinski, DMD, chief of pediatric dentistry at Schneider Children's Hospital in New Hyde Park, New York.

Dentists used to call early dental caries "baby bottle tooth decay" because it often occurs in children who drink milk or juice during the night , allowing sugar to sit on the teeth for 10 or 12 hours. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) advises weaning your child from the bottle by 12 to 18 months to prevent tooth decay—but you shouldn't let your toddler walk around all day with a sippy cup either (unless it's filled with plain water).

Focus on fluoride

If your community's water is not fluoridated (check with your dentist or municipal water supply board) or your kids only drink non-fluoridated bottled or filtered water, talk to your pediatrician about fluoride supplements. Too much fluoride, however, can lead to fluorosis, which causes white spots on the teeth. That's why kids under 2 or 3 shouldn't use fluoride toothpaste until they can spit it out instead of swallowing it.

Treat teeth earlier

Dentists can now apply a safe and protective fluoride varnish to young children's teeth. A study found that 1-year-olds who got this treatment twice a year were four times less likely to get cavities in their baby teeth. Also, ask your dentist about sealants or plastic coatings that prevent decay. Some insurance plans will cover these treatments.

Take care of your own smile

If you have a history of dental problems, avoid sharing utensils or toothbrushes with your baby or toddler—or even letting them stick their fingers in your mouth. You might also consider taking measures to reduce the levels of cavity-causing bacteria in your mouth. Your dentist can prescribe an antibacterial mouthwash that can reduce transmission to young children.

Research has also found that chewing sugarless gum containing the sweetener xylitol (such as Trident, Wrigley's Orbit, or Carefree Koolerz) four times a day significantly lowers a mother's bacteria levels.

Good nutrition during pregnancy may also strengthen a baby's tooth enamel. Of course, you should brush and floss well and get any problems treated promptly. This will also set a good example for your child and show them that taking care of their teeth is as essential as taking care of other aspects of their health.

Here are some age-specific tips for preventing tooth decay.

  • Clean your baby's gums even before their first teeth erupt. Wipe them with a damp washcloth after feedings.
  • Start brushing as soon as the first tooth appears. Wet a baby toothbrush and gently rub it back and forth on the tooth's surface and along the gum line. If you use toothpaste, make sure it's fluoride-free.
  • Brush your toddler's teeth for at least 30 seconds (ideally a minute) after breakfast and before bed. Lean your baby's head on your lap and place the brush at a 45-degree angle to the teeth.
  • Start using a tiny amount of fluoride toothpaste when they're 2 or 3 years old. Begin flossing teeth for them when two of their teeth are touching.

Preschoolers

  • Brush your own teeth at the same time your preschooler brushes, and give them lots of positive feedback.
  • Studies have found that manual toothbrushes are just as effective as powered ones. But if letting your kid use an electric or battery-operated one makes it easier to get them to brush, go for it.

School-age kids

  • Your child can start brushing and flossing on their own at around age 7. If your child can tie their own shoes, chances are they are ready to brush solo. Your child should now brush for two minutes.
  • Look for food and plaque around the gum line of their teeth to see whether they are doing a sufficient job. You can also periodically let them chew gum with xylitol.

Key Takeaways

The earlier you can establish solid oral health routines for you and your child, the better. Talk to your dentist about strategies to help your child keep their teeth strong and healthy. If your child doesn't have a dentist, talk to their regular doctor for recommendations.

Dental Caries (Tooth Decay) in Children Ages 2 to 11 Years . National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research . 2022.

The Tooth Decay Process: How To Reverse It and Avoid a Cavity . The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research . 2022.

Oral Health Behaviors and Bacterial Transmission From Mother to Child: An Explorative Study . BMC Oral Health . 2015.

American Academy of Pediatrics Updates Recommendations on Maintaining, Improving Children’s Oral Health .  American Academy of Pediatrics . 2022.

Good Oral Health Starts Early: AAP Policy Explained . American Academy of Pediatrics . 2022.

The Importance of the Age One Dental Visit . American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry . 2019.

Fluoride & Dental Health . National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research . 2019.

Positive Association Between Sugar Consumption and Dental Decay Prevalence Independent of Oral Hygiene in Pre-School Children: A Longitudinal Prospective Study . Journal of Public Health . 2018.

From Bottle to Cup: Helping Your Child Make a Healthy Transition . American Academy of Pediatrics . 2023.

Fluorosis . Centers for Disease Control and Prevention . 2019.

Fluoride Varnish Efficacy in Preventing Early Childhood Caries . Journal of Dental Research . 2006.

Xylitol in Preventing Dental Caries: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analyses . Journal of Natural Science, Biology and Medicine . 2017.

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About Down Syndrome

  • Down syndrome is a genetic condition where a person is born with an extra chromosome.
  • This can affect how their brain and body develop.
  • People diagnosed with Down syndrome can lead healthy lives with supportive care.

Happy toddler with Down syndome.

Down syndrome is a condition in which a person has an extra copy of chromosome 21. Chromosomes are small "packages" of genes in the body's cells, which determine how the body forms and functions.

When babies are growing, the extra chromosome changes how their body and brain develop. This can cause both physical and mental challenges.

People with Down syndrome often have developmental challenges, such as being slower to learn to speak than other children.

Distinct physical signs of Down syndrome are usually present at birth and become more apparent as the baby grows. They can include facial features, such as:

  • A flattened face, especially the bridge of the nose
  • Almond-shaped eyes that slant up
  • A tongue that tends to stick out of the mouth

Other physical signs can include:

  • A short neck
  • Small ears, hands, and feet
  • A single line across the palm of the hand (palmar crease)
  • Small pinky fingers
  • Poor muscle tone or loose joints
  • Shorter-than-average height

Some people with Down syndrome have other medical problems as well. Common health problems include:

  • Congenital heart defects
  • Hearing loss
  • Obstructive sleep apnea

Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal condition diagnosed in the United States. Each year, about 5,700 babies born in the US have Down syndrome. 1

Collage of photos of people of all races and ages with Down syndrome. Text reads

There are three types of Down syndrome. The physical features and behaviors are similar for all three types.

With Trisomy 21, each cell in the body has three separate copies of chromosome 21. About 95% of people with Down syndrome have Trisomy 21.

Translocation Down syndrome

In this type, an extra part or a whole extra chromosome 21 is present. However, the extra chromosome is attached or "trans-located" to a different chromosome rather than being a separate chromosome 21. This type accounts for about 3% of people with Down syndrome.

Mosaic Down syndrome

Mosaic means mixture or combination. In this type, some cells have three copies of chromosome 21, but other cells have the typical two copies. People with mosaic Down syndrome may have fewer features of the condition. This type accounts for about 2% of people with Down syndrome.

Risk factors

We don't know for sure why Down syndrome occurs or how many different factors play a role. We do know that some things can affect your risk of having a baby with Down syndrome.

One factor is your age when you get pregnant. The risk of having a baby with Down syndrome increases with age, especially if you are 35 years or older when you get pregnant. 2 3 4

However, the majority of babies with Down syndrome are still born to mothers less than 35 years old. This is because there are many more births among younger women. 5 6

Regardless of age, parents who have one child with Down syndrome are at an increased risk of having another child with Down syndrome. 7

Screening and diagnosis

There are two types of tests available to detect Down syndrome during pregnancy: screening tests and diagnostic tests. A screening test can tell you if your pregnancy has a higher chance of being affected Down syndrome. Screening tests don't provide an absolute diagnosis.

Diagnostic tests can typically detect if a baby will have Down syndrome, but they carry more risk. Neither screening nor diagnostic tests can predict the full impact of Down syndrome on a baby.

The views of these organizations are their own and do not reflect the official position of CDC.

Down Syndrome Resource Foundation (DSRF) : The DSRF supports people living with Down syndrome and their families with individualized and leading-edge educational programs, health services, information resources, and rich social connections so each person can flourish in their own right.

GiGi's Playhouse : GiGi's Playhouse provides free educational, therapeutic-based, and career development programs for individuals with Down syndrome, their families, and the community, through a replicable playhouse model.

Global Down Syndrome Foundation : This foundation is dedicated to significantly improving the lives of people with Down syndrome through research, medical care, education and advocacy.

National Association for Down Syndrome : The National Association for Down Syndrome supports all persons with Down syndrome in achieving their full potential. They seek to help families, educate the public, address social issues and challenges, and facilitate active participation.

National Down Syndrome Society (NDSS) : NDSS seeks to increase awareness and acceptance of those with Down syndrome.

  • Stallings, E. B., Isenburg, J. L., Rutkowski, R. E., Kirby, R. S., Nembhard, W.N., Sandidge, T., Villavicencio, S., Nguyen, H. H., McMahon, D. M., Nestoridi, E., Pabst, L. J., for the National Birth Defects Prevention Network. National population-based estimates for major birth defects, 2016–2020. Birth Defects Research. 2024 Jan;116(1), e2301.
  • Allen EG, Freeman SB, Druschel C, et al. Maternal age and risk for trisomy 21 assessed by the origin of chromosome nondisjunction: a report from the Atlanta and National Down Syndrome Projects. Hum Genet. 2009 Feb;125(1):41-52.
  • Ghosh S, Feingold E, Dey SK. Etiology of Down syndrome: Evidence for consistent association among altered meiotic recombination, nondisjunction, and maternal age across populations. Am J Med Genet A. 2009 Jul;149A(7):1415-20.
  • Sherman SL, Allen EG, Bean LH, Freeman SB. Epidemiology of Down syndrome. Ment Retard Dev Disabil Res Rev. 2007;13(3):221-7.
  • Olsen CL, Cross PK, Gensburg LJ, Hughes JP. The effects of prenatal diagnosis, population ageing, and changing fertility rates on the live birth prevalence of Down syndrome in New York State, 1983-1992. Prenat Diagn. 1996 Nov;16(11):991-1002.
  • Adams MM, Erickson JD, Layde PM, Oakley GP. Down's syndrome. Recent trends in the United States. JAMA. 1981 Aug 14;246(7):758-60.
  • Morris JK, Mutton DE, Alberman E. Recurrences of free trisomy 21: analysis of data from the National Down Syndrome Cytogenetic Register. Prenatal Diagnosis: Published in Affiliation With the International Society for Prenatal Diagnosis. 2005 Dec 15;25(12):1120-8.

Birth Defects

About one in every 33 babies is born with a birth defect. Although not all birth defects can be prevented, people can increase their chances of having a healthy baby by managing health conditions and adopting healthy behaviors before becoming pregnant.

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Family visit to Kottayam's Illikkal Kallu ends in infant's death

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Kottayam: A one-year-old girl has died after the scooter carrying her family back from a visit to Illikkal Kallu here overturned. The accident occurred near Adukkathu around 3.30 pm on Wednesday.

The deceased is Insa Mariam, the daughter of Irshad, of Moriyattu, Palluruthy, Ernakulam. Irshad (34), his wife Shinija (30), and their daughter Naira (4) were all injured in the accident.

The scooter they were travelling on lost control and overturned onto the lower side of the road. Residents rushed the family of four to a private hospital in Erattupetta and then to another private hospital in Cherpunkal. However, Insa Mariam succumbed to her injuries.

Stillborn baby's body kept near mother for a day, complaint against Kottayam hospital

Stillborn baby's body kept near mother for a day, complaint against Kottayam hospital

Infant's body found in plastic waste disposed by Kottayam MCH

Infant's body found in plastic waste disposed by Kottayam MCH

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Analysis | How Centre throttled Kerala and how FM Balagopal's response heaped more burden

Analysis | How Centre throttled Kerala and how FM Balagopal's response heaped more burden

Kerala CM returns 2 days early from family trip to 3 countries

Kerala CM returns 2 days early from family trip to 3 countries

Notorious thief Balamurugan, wanted in 53 cases, escapes police custody at Viyyur

Notorious thief Balamurugan, wanted in 53 cases, escapes police custody at Viyyur

Bird Flu: Central team mulls special action plan for Kuttanad

Bird Flu: Central team mulls special action plan for Kuttanad

Wild boar attacks go unchecked in Kozhikode, Malappuram since LS polls declaration

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TVM man's death in Muscat: Kerala govt slams Air India Express, writes to Centre seeking compensation

TVM man's death in Muscat: Kerala govt slams Air India Express, writes to Centre seeking compensation

Woman, friend set fire to house, bike of estranged lover in Pathanamthitta

Woman, friend set fire to house, bike of estranged lover in Pathanamthitta

Kid who suffered burns after being fed hot milk at Kannur anganwadi afraid to have food now

Kid who suffered burns after being fed hot milk at Kannur anganwadi afraid to have food now

 Beef price goes up in Kozhikode, merchants blame it on shortage

Beef price goes up in Kozhikode, merchants blame it on shortage

Teen died from eating a spicy chip as part of social media challenge, autopsy report concludes

A Massachusetts teen who participated in  a spicy tortilla chip challenge on social media  died from ingesting a high amount of a chili pepper extract, according to an autopsy report obtained by The Associated Press.

Harris Wolobah, a 10th grader from the city of Worcester, died on Sept. 1, 2023, after eating the chip. He was found unresponsive by police who were called to his home, and brought to a hospital, where he died.

The cause of death was listed as cardiopulmonary arrest “in the setting of recent ingestion of food substance with high capsaicin concentration.”

The 14-year-old boy also had an enlarged heart and a congenital heart defect, according to the report, the findings of which were shared with the AP in an email from Elaine Driscoll, a spokesperson for the Massachusetts Executive Office of Public Safety and Security.

The cause of death was determined on Feb. 27, and the death certificate was released to the city clerk’s office on March 5, Driscoll said.

The manufacturer of the chip, Paqui,  asked retailers to stop selling the product  shortly after Harris’ death.

The chip, sold individually for about $10, comes wrapped in foil in a coffin-shaped box containing the warning that it is intended for the “vengeful pleasure of intense heat and pain.” The warning notes that the chip is for adult consumption only, and should be kept out of the reach of children.

Despite the warning, children have had no problem buying the chips. There have been reports from around the country of teens who have gotten sick after taking part in the challenge, including three California high school students who were sent to a hospital. Paramedics were called to a Minnesota school when seven students fell ill after taking part in the challenge.

The Associated Press

Cinderella visits patients at HSHS St. Vincent Children’s Hospital

Pediatric patients at HSHS St. Vincent Children’s Hospital were treated to an enchanting visit...

GREEN BAY, Wis. (WBAY) - Pediatric patients at HSHS St. Vincent Children’s Hospital were treated to an enchanting visit from a well-known fairy-tale princess on Thursday.

Cinderella whisked her way through the hospital’s pediatric hematology-oncology clinic and the pediatric care and pediatric intensive care units, hosting tea parties and sharing hugs and smiles.

Complete with tiaras and magic wands, the visit provided the opportunity for patients and families to create special memories within the hospital walls.

Thursday’s visit was coordinated by the Child Life team at HSHS St. Vincent Children’s Hospital.

Copyright 2024 WBAY. All rights reserved.

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Baby shot multiple times at Arizona home; fire breaks out during standoff

SURPRISE, Ariz. ( KPHO /Gray News) - A 6-month-old child is in the hospital after being shot multiple times Friday at an Arizona home where fire crews also battled a fire at that home just hours later.

Family members said the baby is doing OK and police said the child was still undergoing surgery for injuries to the “lower extremities,” as of 4:30 p.m. local time

Officers responded around noon to a report that a woman was held hostage by her baby’s father at a home in the area of Cotton Lane and Cactus Road in Surprise. The woman, who escaped, reportedly told officers that she believed her child was in danger after the man broke into the home in the early morning hours and was holding her against her will.

Officers forced their way into the home, and police heard gunshots.

They found the baby, who had been shot multiple times.

Police said they didn’t see or talk to the suspect but rescued the child from inside the house.

However, an officer did fire one round during that initial call.

The child was flown to a nearby hospital with serious injuries, officers confirmed.

The woman suffered only minor injuries, but police did not specify what those injuries were.

Authorities believe the suspect was inside when the fire occurred. They don’t have an update on his condition.

A crew in Arizona’s Family’s news chopper spotted armored SWAT trucks at a home in the area. The home’s garage and windows were destroyed as officers with armed police surrounded the home.

Around 3 p.m., the house caught fire. Video from the scene showed the fire erupting and fully engulfing the home.

“Next thing you know, there was smoke. And after the smoke, there’s a huge ball of fire coming from the back of the house and it just spread from the back all the way to the front,” said Hector Holguin, an Arizona’s Family drone operator, who was on the scene when the fire started. “It just progressed. It collapsed the roof.”

Because the suspect might have still been in the home, firefighters couldn’t get too close to the flames. It also caused a delayed response from fire crews.

“Firefighters don’t wear bulletproof vests. Firefighters don’t have weapons so they are vulnerable in these kinds of situations so it’s imperative that law enforcement stabilize that scene in such a way that it’s safe to address the fire,” said Andy Anderson, a former assistant Phoenix police chief.

Firefighters used two ladder trucks to spray the house with water and water down the house next door to keep the flames from spreading.

By 4:30 p.m., the fire appeared to have been put out, but firefighters were still mopping up hot spots.

The department is asking nearby residents to avoid the area while it was an active scene.

Copyright 2024 Arizona's Family via Gray Media Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

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COMMENTS

  1. The 12-Month Well-Baby Visit

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Important Milestones: Your Child by One Year, August 2021. KidsHealth From Nemours, Your Child's Checkup: 1 Year (12 Months), April 2021. Mayo Clinic, Language Development: Speech Milestones for Babies, March 2021.

  2. AAP Schedule of Well-Child Care Visits

    It is a schedule of screenings and assessments recommended at each well-child visit from infancy through adolescence. Schedule of well-child visits. The first week visit (3 to 5 days old) 1 month old; 2 months old; 4 months old; 6 months old; 9 months old; 12 months old; 15 months old; 18 months old; 2 years old (24 months) 2 ½ years old (30 ...

  3. Well-Child Visit: 1 Year (12 Months) (for Parents)

    1. Check your toddler's weight, length, and head circumference and plot the measurements on a growth chart. 2. Ask questions, address concerns, and offer advice about how your child is: Eating. By 12 months, toddlers are ready to switch from formula to cow's milk. Children may be breastfed beyond 1 year of age, if desired.

  4. Well-Child Visits for Infants and Young Children

    Immunizations are usually administered at the two-, four-, six-, 12-, and 15- to 18-month well-child visits; the four- to six-year well-child visit; and annually during influenza season ...

  5. Your Guide to Well-Baby Visits During Your Child's First Year

    Your baby's first official checkup (and first immunization) will take place at the hospital. After that, well-baby visits are scheduled throughout the first two years at: The first week (usually a couple of days after you're discharged from the hospital) 1 month. 2 months.

  6. Well-Child Visits: Parent and Patient Education

    Beginning at the 7 year visit, there is both a Parent and Patient education handout (in English and Spanish). For the Bright Futures Parent Handouts for well-child visits up to 2 years of age, translations of 12 additional languages (PDF format) are made possible thanks to the generous support of members, staff, and businesses who donate to the ...

  7. Well-Child Visit: What's Included and When to Go

    A typical schedule includes well-child checks at ages: 3 to 5 days; 2-4 weeks; 2 months; 4 months; 6 months; 9 months; 12 months; 15 months; 18 months; 2 years; 3 years

  8. First Well Child Visit? Here's What to Expect

    The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that most babies have their first doctor visit when they are 3 to 5 days old. After that, the AAP recommends well-baby visits in the first year at 1, 2, 4, 6, 9, and 12 months. See the list of check-in ages here. Remember, your child's healthcare provider should still be available to you ...

  9. Well-Child Visits

    Your child's doctor will recommend a schedule for well-child visits. One example is for visits at ages: footnote 1. 3 to 5 days old. By 1 month. 2 months. 4 months. 6 months. 9 months. 1 year. 15 months. 18 months. 2 years. 30 months. 3 years. After age 3, well-child visits are usually scheduled yearly through the teen years.

  10. Quick guide to your infant's first pediatrician visits

    Well-child visits also give you a chance to discuss any questions or concerns you might have and get advice from a trusted source on how to provide the best possible care for your child. ... Infant's First Year (0-1) Toddler (2-4) Elementary Children (5-10) Tween & Teen (11-17)

  11. Well-Child Visit Handouts

    Well-Child Visit Handouts. Parent and patient handouts from the Bright Futures Tool and Resource Kit, 2nd Edition, address key information for health supervision care from infancy through adolescence.Bright Futures is a national health care promotion and disease prevention initiative that uses a developmentally based approach to address children's health care needs in the context of family ...

  12. Make the Most of Your Baby's Visit to the Doctor (Ages 0 to 11 Months

    Babies need to go to the doctor or nurse for a "well-baby visit" 6 times during their first year. Share this resource to help parents make the most of their baby's visit to the doctor. ... The first well-baby visit is 2 to 3 days after coming home from the hospital, when the baby is about 3 to 5 days old. After that first visit, babies need to ...

  13. What happens during a well-baby checkup?

    15-month well-baby checkup (and a sneak peek at 18 months) At your baby's 15-month checkup, your child will receive final doses of PCV, Hib, DTaP vaccines. And at 18 months, they'll get their final Hep A shot. So, other than annual flu shots, your child's next round of immunizations won't begin until between the ages of 4 and 6.

  14. Schedule of Well-Child Checkups

    Well-Child Checkup Schedule. Well-child checkups are crucial for keeping your little one healthy and safe as she grows and develops. Below you will find the standard schedule of well-child checkups for the first three years, along with a few examples of what may come up during each checkup. Beginning at age 3, most children will have annual ...

  15. Well-Child Visits: Schedule, Immunizations, & Appointments

    What to Expect at Baby Well-Child Visits. During the first year of your baby's life, they will visit the pediatrician every month or so for a well-child checkup. ... (PPD) during well-child visits at 1, 2, 4, and 6 months of age. If your baby is breastfeeding or consuming less than 27 ounces a day of vitamin-D containing baby formula, ...

  16. Well-Child Visits and Recommended Vaccinations

    Well-child visits and recommended vaccinations are essential and help make sure children stay healthy. Children who are not protected by vaccines are more likely to get diseases like measles and whooping cough. These diseases are extremely contagious and can be very serious, especially for babies and young children.

  17. Make the Most of Your Child's Visit to the Doctor (Ages 1 to 4

    Young children grow quickly, so they need to visit the doctor or nurse regularly to make sure they're healthy and developing normally. Children ages 1 to 4 need to see the doctor or nurse when they're: 12 months old. 15 months old (1 year and 3 months) 18 months old (1 year and 6 months) 24 months old (2 years) 30 months old (2 years and 6 ...

  18. Well Baby Visits: What to Expect

    Well Baby Visits: Newborn, 1 Month and 2 Months. Congratulations on your new baby! Having a child is a large responsibility and can be a lot of work. At times it can seem overwhelming. Learn what to expect at your baby's newborn, 1 month and 2 month well visits.

  19. What to Do at Well-Child Visits: The AAFP's Perspective

    Tobacco use, counseling to prevent initiation. Children six years and older. Obesity, screening. Children 10 years and older. Skin cancer, counseling to reduce risk. Children 12 years and older ...

  20. Well Baby Visit: 1-Year Checkup

    Address any concerns about your baby's growth or weight. By 1 year, she'll have about tripled her birth weight. Your baby will be growing more slowly, but steadily, in this second year. If your baby is too chubby, she may be drinking too much milk. Your healthcare provider will let you know if your baby's weight is out of proportion to her ...

  21. 5 Smart Ways To Prevent Cavities in Kids

    Toddlers. Brush your toddler's teeth for at least 30 seconds (ideally a minute) after breakfast and before bed. Lean your baby's head on your lap and place the brush at a 45-degree angle to the ...

  22. New data shows the most popular baby names in the U.S.

    Liam's reign among baby boy names is now in its seventh year, with 20,802 of the 1.7 million boys born in 2023 sharing the name. Olivia has been the top name for girls since 2019.

  23. National Maternal Mental Health Hotline

    Pregnant or just had a baby? The National Maternal Mental Health Hotline is free, confidential, and here to help, 24/7. 1-833-TLC-MAMA. Text Call We're here for you. The Hotline is free, confidential, and available 24/7 in English and Spanish. ... Not caring for yourself as well (dressing, showering) Trouble focusing; Not managing daily chores ;

  24. About Down Syndrome

    Some people with Down syndrome have other medical problems as well. Common health problems include: Congenital heart defects. Hearing loss. Obstructive sleep apnea. Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal condition diagnosed in the United States. Each year, about 5,700 babies born in the US have Down syndrome. 1

  25. Family visit to Kottayam's Illikkal Kallu ends in infant's death

    Kottayam: A one-year-old girl has died after the scooter carrying her family back from a visit to Illikkal Kallu here overturned. The accident occurred near Adukkathu around 3.30 pm on Wednesday. The deceased is Insa Mariam, the daughter of Irshad, of Moriyattu, Palluruthy, Ernakulam. Irshad (34), his wife Shinija (30), and their daughter Naira ...

  26. Teen died from eating spicy chip as part of social media challenge

    For an optimal experience visit our site on another browser. ... a 10th grader from the city of Worcester, died on Sept. 1, 2023, after eating the chip. ... The 14-year-old boy also had an ...

  27. Cinderella visits patients at HSHS St. Vincent Children's Hospital

    Pediatric patients at HSHS St. Vincent Children's Hospital were treated to an enchanting visit from a well-known fairy-tale princess on Thursday.

  28. Baby shot multiple times at Arizona home; fire breaks out during standoff

    A baby is undergoing surgery after being shot multiple times at a Surprise home, which later caught fire and was destroyed. SURPRISE, Ariz. ( KPHO /Gray News) - A 6-month-old child is in the ...