Here's How Often You Really Need to Go to the Dentist

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‌ My teeth feel fine! I don't have time! Sitting in the chair makes me anxious! ‌ Most of us have no trouble coming up with reasons to delay seeing the dentist. But putting off your next appointment (or simply forgetting about it) can set you up for a mouthful of problems.

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So how often should you go to the dentist, really? Here's what the experts have to say, and the convincing reasons to stay on schedule.

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Most adults and children should get dental check-ups every six months, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM). Twice-yearly visits can help catch tooth decay or other dental problems early, before it has a chance to cause pain or other problems.

Why Regular Dental Checkups Are Important

The benefits go far beyond getting a new toothbrush and some free toothpaste. "Going to the dentist twice per year allows you to be proactive instead of reactive in regards to your teeth and dental health," says Westchester, New York-based dentist Richard Lipari, DDS .

You'll Catch Problems Sooner, When They're Easier to Treat

You can't always feel problems like tooth decay or gum disease early on — but your dentist can see them. And spotting a problem earlier gives you a chance to address it before it spreads. "When gum disease and cavities are not resolved quickly, they can turn into larger issues such as loose teeth and root canals," Dr. Lipari says.

You'll Keep Your Teeth Healthy

If your pearly whites are already in pristine condition (or close enough), regular dental visits can help keep them that way. That deep-clean brushing and scraping, while not the most enjoyable, is a must for removing calculus (aka tartar) — plaque that builds up and hardens over time.

"Once plaque turns to calculus it's nearly impossible to remove with a toothbrush and requires a dental professional to remove it," Dr. Lipari says. Along with making it hard to clean your teeth, tartar also can lead to gingivitis, which is the early form of gum disease, per the American Dental Association (ADA).

The Dentist Will Check for Oral Cancer

In addition to examining your teeth, your dentist will check your tongue, head and neck for possible signs of oral cancer . It's quick and easy — and most of the time, they won't find anything. But it's an important chance to spot suspicious growths sooner, when they may be easier to treat, per the Mayo Clinic .

You'll Save Money and Time in the Long Run

Dental visits can be costly, especially if you don't have insurance. But the money you'll pay for a cleaning is a lot less than what you'll pay for a filling, root canal or other procedures. "That short appointment can help prevent cavities and gum disease, saving you a lot of time, money and effort in the future," Dr. Lipari says.

Do Certain Factors Mean You Need to Go More (or Less) Frequently?

Most people do well on a two-visit-per-year schedule. But in some cases, you and your dentist may decide it's worth scheduling checkups more often — up to three or four times a year, Dr. Lipari notes.

More frequent visits might be a good idea for:

  • ‌ People with existing gum disease or dental problems. ‌ If you have signs of gingivitis (like swollen or bleeding gums or gums that itch ), seeing the dentist more often can help resolve the problem and prevent it from turning into periodontitis, a severe gum infection that can cause tooth loss.
  • ‌ Smokers. ‌ Smoking irritates the gums and can eventually cause periodontitis, Dr. Lipari says, so it's a good idea to see your dentist more frequently.
  • ‌ People with a weakened immune system: ‌ When your immune system isn't operating at full force, you may be more prone to gum disease and tooth decay.
  • ‌ Some pregnant people. ‌ Hormone changes during pregnancy can sometimes cause gingivitis. If you're experiencing gum swelling or bleeding, more frequent visits with the dentist can help get the problem under control, Dr. Lipari says.

What to Expect at a Dental Checkup

If it's been a while since your last chopper check, here's what you can expect.

  • ‌ The hygienist will perform a cleaning. ‌ They'll use small metal tools to scrape plaque buildup off of your teeth, floss your teeth and brush your teeth using a special electric toothbrush. Kids might have a fluoride gel or foam applied to their teeth too, which can help prevent tooth decay.
  • ‌ You may get X-rays. ‌ X-rays can detect problems that aren't otherwise visible, like early cavities, tooth decay or bone loss. These may not be required at every visit, per the Cleveland Clinic .
  • ‌ The dentist will examine your teeth and mouth. ‌ They'll review your X-rays and take a look inside your mouth to see your teeth and gums. They'll also perform an oral cancer check by looking at the insides of your lips, the sides of your tongue and the roof and floor of your mouth.

The Bottom Line

It's a good idea to see the dentist every six months, or more often if you have gum or tooth problems or are at high risk for developing them. Some people with excellent dental hygiene may just be more prone to developing cavities , for instance.

If you're anxious about your visit, let the dentist know so you can find ways to address your discomfort .

Finally, know that there are options if you don't have dental insurance and are having trouble paying for your exam. "Many areas have dental schools where patients can seek out dental treatment at a reduced price, which can be a solution for preventive care," Dr. Lipari says.

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  • National Library of Medicine, Medline Plus: "Dental Exam"
  • Mayo Clinic: "Oral Cancer Screening"
  • American Dental Association: "Plaque"
  • Cleveland Clinic: "Dental X-rays"

Is this an emergency? If you are experiencing serious medical symptoms, please see the National Library of Medicine’s list of signs you need emergency medical attention or call 911.

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How often should I see my dentist?

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Why are regular dentist appointments important?

You consider yourself to have great oral hygiene and regularly brush and floss your teeth to keep your mouth clean. Your excellent oral hygiene habits may lead you to wonder if you still need to visit your dentist on a regular basis. The answer is yes!   Even if you take good care of your teeth and gums at home, it’s still important that you regularly visit your dentist who is professionally trained to check for problems you may not see or feel yourself.

The truth is, many dental problems like cavities, gum disease, and oral cancer don’t become visible or cause pain until they are in the more advanced stage, which makes treatment and follow-up all the more extensive. Even if you are healthy today, your risk for dental disease can change over time and can be affected by factors like illness, diet changes, new medication usage, and more. So why risk it?

The frequency at which you visit your dentist should be based on several factors. This includes your current oral health condition, individual oral hygiene habits, general health status and medical conditions, as well as your own self- and dentist-assessed risk for oral health problems.

Assessing your risk for dental disease

When evaluating your risk for dental disease, you should consider all personal health, lifestyle, and genetic factors that contribute to your risk-level. Risk factors include a diet high in sugar and refined carbohydrates, poor oral habits, lack of exposure to fluoride containing water, smoking or use of other tobacco products, heavy alcohol or recreational drug use, and medical conditions including diabetes, Sjogren’s Syndrome, and head and neck cancers.

Delta Dental offers a free online risk assessment tool called LifeSmile Score TM that helps you determine your level of risk for things like tooth decay, gum disease, and oral cancer. The tool prompts you with a series of questions about family history and current health status and habits and analyzes your answers to reveal your oral health risk score. You can then print your results and share them with your dentist who can factor those scores in with his or her clinical exam and help you develop a customized oral health plan and dental recall visit schedule.

Regularly scheduled visits

The evidence for the ideal interval for routine dental exams is not clear cut, but once or twice a year has been the general recommendation in the U.S. for many years. However, most people at low risk of oral diseases can visit the dentist less frequently, while others may need to go more often.

Your dental insurance coverage will also play a role in how often you see a dentist. Generally, two oral health exams will be covered by your dental insurance plan on an annual basis, but this will depend on your individual dental insurance plan . Remember – even if you believe your mouth to be in perfect health, you should still get a professional cleaning and annual checkup to ensure everything is healthy and on track!

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Other factors to consider

Here are some other factors to consider when you think about how often you should see a dentist.

  • Changes to dental health

Have you recently had any changes in your dental health? Certain things to take note of are chipped, cracked or shifting teeth, swollen or bleeding gums, persistent tooth pain and sensitivity to cold or hot beverages. Should any of these instances occur, be sure to check in with your dentist. 1

  • Dental work & upkeep

When you receive dental work like a filling, crown, or oral surgery, there’s a chance you will need to go back to the dentist for follow-up appointments to ensure your teeth and gums are healing well. This usually involves a quick evaluation by your dentist and also gives you the opportunity to ask any questions you have about the recent dental work. Something to note – if you have active periodontal (gum) disease, you may need more frequent appointments to manage this condition. These appointments may occur every 2-6 months. 2

  • Dental visits for kids

Generally, children should get their first oral exam as soon as their first baby tooth comes in or by their first birthday. As the child gets older, dental checkups should occur as often as your dentist advises, with a typical recommendation of every six months to a year.

  • Dental visits for adults

For adults, the recommended frequency for dental check-ups varies. In most studies, however, regular attenders are considered to be those individuals that visit the dentist at least once a year. The frequency at which you visit the dentist will depend on your own oral health needs, and if you are prone to cavities, gum problems, or oral health issues. How quickly one develops stain and dental plaque on their teeth will also vary from person to person, and some individuals may benefit from a more frequent cleaning schedule should their teeth be more prone to staining or calculus build-up.

Additionally, individuals who have dental insurance typically visit the dentist more often than those who do not. And, companies with wellness programs will often offer incentives for employees to accomplish certain preventive health steps each year. Companies recognize that cost savings can occur for the company and employee by preventing disease.

High risk groups

The following groups may need to see the dentist more frequently, as oral health issues are more likely to arise in:

  • Pregnant women
  • Persons with certain medical conditions such as diabetes, Sjogren’s syndrome, head and neck cancers, HIV/AIDS, and others
  • People with current gum disease
  • People with a weak immune response to bacterial infection
  • People who tend to get cavities or build up plaque
  • People who suffer from dry mouth
  • Older adults

Regardless of how you feel about your overall oral health, it is important to see a dentist regularly. A reasonable goal is to visit the dentist at least once a year for an oral health checkup, although some evidence suggests that those at a low risk for disease may extend to 18-24 months. Check in with your dentist for more information on how they assess your risk for oral disease and what their recommendation is for your individualized exam and cleaning schedule.

Additional resources

Looking for more information? Learn more about basic oral health.

  • Mouthwash 101: what mouthwash does and how to use It
  • How to floss your teeth the right way
  • Learn the proper technique for brushing your teeth

1 Your Top 9 Questions About Going to the Dentist-Answered! (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.mouthhealthy.org/en/dental-care-concerns/questions-about-going-to-the-dentist

2 Periodontitis. (2018, March 6). Retrieved from https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/periodontitis/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20354479

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How Often Should You Go To The Dentist?

Top articles, more articles.

Medically Reviewed By Colgate Global Scientific Communications

One hundred million Americans don't see their dentist every year, even though visiting the dentist regularly is essential in maintaining your oral health. With that being said, you have probably received a text, email, or phone call at some point in your life, reminding you that you are due for your 6-month visit with your dentist. You might be wondering, "how often should I really go to the dentist?"

The typical twice-a-year recommendation to visit the dentist originated from an advertisement for toothpaste, and there's little to no research that supports it. The twice-yearly rule isn't necessarily the best option for everyone. Read on to learn more about how often you should get dental checkups, why you might need to visit a dentist more often, why going to the dentist is essential, and what you can do to stay healthy and minimize your visits.

How Often Should You Visit the Dentist?

While it's true that visiting the dentist twice a year is a good rule of thumb for many people, the truth is that you have your own unique smile needs. So it depends on your oral hygiene, habits, and individual medical conditions.

Some people only need to visit the dentist once or twice are year, while others may need to go more often. So, always remember to ask your dentist when you should schedule your next appointment. And don't worry! They'll probably tell you when they want to see you next anyway.

Who Should Go to the Dentist More Often?

Some people need to visit the dentist more than twice a year. But who? People with a greater risk of dental disease and other health conditions may need to see the dentist every three months or more. This higher-risk group includes:

  • Pregnant women
  • People with gum disease
  • People with a weak immune response
  • People who are prone to cavities or plaque build-up

Why is Going to the Dentist Important?

Even if you brush twice a day and floss daily, you still need to visit a dentist regularly! Your dentist and dental hygienist are trained to check for problems that you might not see or feel on your own. Some things, like cavities or gum disease, aren't even visible or painful until they're more advanced. When it comes to oral cancer , dentists and hygienists are often the first to find it for many patients.

Because the issue might either be preventable or more easily treated when caught early (like oral cancer ), seeing a dentist regularly matters. With regular visits, your dentist will find solutions to any red flags that will save you time, discomfort, and even money in the long run.

What Can You Do to Keep Dentist Appointments to a Minimum?

The best thing you can do to keep your dental visits to a minimum is to maintain good oral hygiene . So, make sure to brush your teeth twice a day and clean between your teeth daily using floss, interdental brushes, or an oral irrigator. And guess what? If your dentist doesn't see any cavities or signs of gingivitis for several years, they might even lengthen the time between your visits.

Now you know that how often you need to visit the dentist depends on your unique smile situation. For some people, like smokers and diabetics, it may be more often. But no matter what, visiting the dentist is a preventative measure that improves your overall health and makes things easier for you in the long run. If you keep up with your daily hygiene, your dentist may even cut back on your required dental appointments. Remember to always follow your dentist's advice in terms of your next appointment. And if it's been a while, it's time to respond to that text, call, or email from your dentists' office for your 6-month dental check-in.

Oral Care Center articles are reviewed by an oral health medical professional. This information is for educational purposes only. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your dentist, physician or other qualified healthcare provider. 

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Is Going to the Dentist Every Six Months a Scam or Nah?

By Maggie Lange

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Do I have to go to the dentist twice a year? Can I go once a year?

Hello. First, I love that you’re questioning everything. Skepticism is one of our greatest assets as humans. So are our chompers!

Short answer: You're probably safe going once a year. My first instinct was to call my beloved dentist. She’s great. Because of a confusion that I could not correct, because there were sharp metal objects in my mouth, she believes I work for The New Yorker and spends our time together reviewing the New Yorker articles she likes. It’s wonderful and she should have a podcast. However, I did not call her because I very much understand procrastinating about the dentist, which is what you are writing about.

Your question is also coming hot after a recent hullabaloo about flossing , after the Departments of Agriculture and Health and Human Services dropped mention of it from dietary guidelines for Americans, because there wasn’t much evidence it helped with gum health over a significant period of time. At best, there is “mediocre evidence” that it helps reduce bloody gums and inflammation (gingivitis), but the evidence quality was “very low.”

This felt like a seismic betrayal: WE HAVE BEEN DOING THIS TERRIBLE MINOR THING FOR SO LONG AND NO ONE IS SURE WHY? And the truth remains out of grasp. The most convincing rebuttal was from Matt Simon on Wired , which was highly philosophical and basically amounted to: Well, the evidence isn’t there, but it has never been there, and also, it isn’t not there. There is truly no possible way to argue with that. On a discourse level, this is an inaccessible argument.

Going to the dentist every six months, as a rule, is similarly unsupported. The dental hygienist is there to scrape off the tartar that builds up in the average of six months. Higher-risk people, who should go to the dentist more, include: smokers, pregnant women, diabetics, people with immune systems that are susceptible to bacterial infection, people who currently have gum disease, people who often get cavities or plaque problems. I did some research about whether there is evidence that people outside of this list should go every six months.

In 2000, three-quarters of dentists recommended checkups every six months, even without evidence to support its effectiveness . In 2002, there was an examination into whether going every half-year was linked to healthy teeth. There wasn’t much evidence for that. In 2003, there was a systematic review of the research about six-month check-ups. Mixed results . In 2013, there was another systematic review, and they found that the evidence was too paltry and too poor quality to even look into. My personal favorite piece of knowledge: This go-every-six-months suggestion has been possibly floating around since the 1700s . I believe this discredits the whole operation, because I don’t trust anyone from the distant past about anything.

This new proclamation about the untested effects of flossing begat much rage. The rage is about frustration that we never know the truth, even when we think we do, and things are out of our control even when we think they're in our control. If we floss, we floss to be in control of our gum health. Turns out maybe it doesn't! If we go to the dentist, it's as a ritual to have super-healthy teeth. But maybe it doesn't! Hearing that there is no evidence, after you believed that there must have been, is infuriating. Why would someone have told us to do something if they didn't have the support to back it up? The base of this rage was: WHO IS IN CHARGE?

This made me think of something I read about authority and truth and unknowability, by Daniel Hiddleswift, who writes for the Colbert show and seems wise. I think about it every day. Anyway, he wrote: “When I was a kid I found a pocket dictionary that defined 'bucket' as 'pail' and vice-versa and realized that no one's in charge of anything.”

No one is in charge of anything. This is dizzying . So who do you trust? I trust my dentist, who deserves her own podcast, and during our last visit she told me I could wait a year before I saw her again. I was too scared to call her to ask her to confirm. But also, two years ago, she told me to floss to prevent a cavity that was just forming, and then I did and then she said it was gone! So, who is ever to know anything. Good luck to you, good luck to your biters, and I apologize on behalf of evidence.

Are you skeptical about whether you have to do something? Send your leading questions to [email protected]. It’s a weekly thing!

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visit dentist every 6 months

Why Are Dentist Check-Ups Scheduled Every 6 Months?

It is widely known that dental check-ups are supposed to be every 6 months for both adults and children, and most professional organizations including the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recommend so. However, have you ever wondered why it’s exactly 6 months and not 4, 8, or 10? Ever asked yourself why it has to be twice per year?

Origins of the 6 Month Check-Up

It’s not quite clear how the 6-month dental check-up (officially called a dental prophylaxis) rule came to be, but most people who have looked into this issue agree that it is not based on scientific findings. One of the greatest legends about how the 6-month check-up interval gained ground is based on the fabrication of a toothpaste advert by an advertising genius called Claude Hopkins in the early 1900s.

Mr. Hopkins was an advertising guru who created crafty marketing campaigns that massively boosted the sales of Schiltz beers and the Pepsodent toothpaste. He made the Pepsodent toothpaste one of the most popular brands in the world within 5 years by associating tooth brushing (which was rare at the time) with health and beauty. In the Pepsodent marketing campaign, Hopkins created a catchphrase that read “Use Pepsodent every day – see your dentist twice a year” that caught on and formed the basis of dental check-up intervals to date.

6 Months Is an Arbitrary Time Frame…Sort Of

Although 6 months has since become the industry standard for dental prophylaxis intervals, it may not be the not the optimum interval for everyone. It’s just that it has become self-fulfilling and it’s what people now expect. Plus, the insurance industry has incorporated it into its system and typically covers 2 dental check-ups and cleanings per year.

However, different people have different genetics, diets, and dental care habits. Some people could get away with 8 months before the next dental visit (not recommended), while others might need a dental appointment every 4 months.

Patients that require dental check-ups regularly (say every 3 to 4 months) often have periodontal diseases such as gum infections or are highly susceptible to cavities. If these infections are not spotted and treated in time, they could progress to become severe dental problems. A minority of dental patients could go slightly longer than 6 months without an appointment and maintain healthy teeth, but the risk is high and the benefits of delaying a check-up so scant that the 6 month period is typically set as the maximum time frame between check-ups. This is the policy we adopt at Bunker Hill Dentistry.

A Year is Too Long to Wait

While 6 months is not the ideal interval for everyone, a year is certainly too long for a majority of people. Within a year, a filling can turn into a root canal, and a gum treatment can turn into gum graft. You can’t afford to wait a year if you don’t fall into the “lucky” category. Mouths are quite unpredictable, and it doesn’t take long for a problem to pop up and become potentially dangerous. The sooner a dentist catches the issue, the simpler it is to treat it.

Also, people can develop bad habits – both dental and non-dental such as smoking – in 6 months, or symptoms from an existing bad habit that weren’t present in the last check-up may then develop and worsen if left for a year. Patients could also start taking medication, and most medicines are known to increase the risk of plaque buildup and cavities formation.

Depending on your dental habits, the chemistry of your mouth, and the last findings of your tooth examination, it’s essential to have a check-up after 6 months to establish the state of your dental health.

Good Reasons for Regular Visits

Here are a few reasons why regular dental visits are recommended:

1. Prevent Plaque And Tartar Buildup

Brushing and flossing your teeth diligently (2 to 3 times a day) is one of the best ways to maintain excellent dental health. Brushing and flossing comprise 2 of the 5 core practices for healthy teeth and gums which we make clear in our caring for teeth guide (we’ve also compiled a list of secret dental tips that go beyond core practices for strong teeth and gums). However, certain areas of the mouth simply can’t get adequate cleaning with brushing and flossing. Plaque and tartar accumulates in these areas over time and need to be removed every 6 months for good oral health. If they are not eliminated, they can lead to tooth decay and gum disease which is not something to be desired.

2. Discovery Of Potentially Dangerous Dental Problems

Frequent dental check-ups allow a dentist to spot potential problems early on so that they can find ways to prevent serious health issues in the long-run. They can carry out dental X-rays on your teeth and gums to discover problems that are not visible to the naked eye. They can also undertake oral cancer checks, and if they find any traces of the disease take appropriate treatment action fast to increase the chances of full recovery.

3. Save Money

Identifying and treating dental-related problems early can save you plenty of money in the long-run. Regular dental visits can help detect potential dental issues early when they don’t require expensive treatment. Dental check-ups and cleaning also reduce your chances of developing tooth decay and gum disease, which are likely to require costly treatment such as tooth surgery. Plus, fillings and sealants are much cheaper than root canals and tooth extractions.

4. Keep a healthy, beautiful smile

A healthy smile incredibly boosts one’s confidence, but it cannot come by with poor dental health. According to a study by the American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry, a huge number of people (96% of all adults interviewed), think that an attractive smile makes a person more good-looking. Regular dental visits guarantee you a wide range of treatments and procedures to clean, whiten and brighten your teeth; ensuring your smile is one of the best among those around you.

All in all, the importance of visiting a professional dentist regularly cannot be understated. The industry standard requires you to visit them twice per year, but depending on the state of your dental health a physician will recommend whether to lower that frequency for best results.

visit dentist every 6 months

Ann Le has been successfully managing dental practices since 1990. She is currently Practice Manager at Bunker Hill Dentistry in Houston, TX which she runs with her husband Dr. Tri M Le.

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Why you need to visit your Dentist every 6 months

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The health and safety of our community is our highest priority. As the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) continues to spread across the country, we would like to share some of the actions we are taking to help protect our patients and our employees.

Dental Lavelle follows strict guidelines for Infection Control in Dental Healthcare settings as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), USA. In the next few days, we will be sharing a detailed article on our current sterilization and disinfection protocol to help explain and reassure our patients of our highest level of care currently being implemented. As the situation on COVID-19 continues to evolve, we will closely monitor guidance from American Dental Association, CDC, the World Health Organization (WHO), Indian Dental Association and local health officials around the country. We will continue to rely on their recommendations and expertise to inform us for implementing protocol.

As a result, we are increasing the frequency and rigor of cleaning, disinfection and sanitization at Dental Lavelle.

We’re also continuing to do all we can to make sure you feel safe, comfortable and welcome.

All of us at Dental Lavelle understand that this issue is a cause for concern to many, and we offer our deepest sympathies to those who have been affected. Rest assured that as circumstances continue to develop, we will remain committed to the health and well-being of our patients, customers, employees, doctors and communities.

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  • The Importance of Regular Dental Visits

THE IMPORTANCE OF REGULAR DENTAL VISITS

The Importance of Regular Dental Visits

How Often Should You Go to the Dentist?

What goes on during a dentist visit.

Have you ever wondered why the American Dental Association and your dentist recommend you come back every six months? It’s because regular dental visits are essential for the maintenance of healthy teeth and gums. And in between those examinations, it’s important that you work to keep your teeth and gums clean and healthy. If you need additional help, your dentist may even suggest more frequent visits.

Checking your teeth for tooth decay is just one part of a thorough dental examination. During your checkup appointment, your dentist (or dental hygienist) will likely evaluate the health of your gums, perform a head and neck examination (to look for anything out of the ordinary) and examine your mouth for any indications of oral cancer, diabetes or vitamin deficiencies. Don’t be surprised if your dentist also examines your face, bite, saliva and movement of your lower jaw joints (TMJs). Your dentist or dental hygienist will then clean your teeth and stress the importance of you maintaining good oral hygiene at home between visits.

Many dentists will pay special attention to plaque and tartar. This is because plaque and tartar can build up in a very short time if  good oral hygiene is not practiced between visits. Food, beverages and tobacco can stain teeth as well. If not removed, soft plaque can harden on the teeth and irritate the gum tissue. If not treated,  plaque can lead to  gum disease .

During your regularly scheduled dental appointments, your dentist will likely look at your gums, mouth, tongue and throat. There are several routine parts to a dental examination.

The Head And Neck Examination Your dentist will start off by:

  • Examining your face
  • Examining your neck
  • Checking your lymph nodes
  • Checking your lower jaw joints (TMJs)

The Clinical Dental Examination Next, your dentist assesses the state of your teeth and gums by:

  • Examining the gums
  • Looking for signs of  gum disease
  • Checking for loose teeth
  • Looking at the tissues inside of your mouth
  • Examining your tongue
  • Checking your bite
  • Looking for visual evidence of tooth decay
  • Checking for broken teeth
  • Checking for damaged fillings
  • Looking for changes in the gums covering teeth
  • Evaluating any dental appliance you have
  • Checking the contact between your teeth
  • Taking X-rays

The Dental Cleaning During the final part of the dental visit, your dental professional cleans your mouth using these methods:

  • Checking the cleanliness of your teeth and gums
  • Removing any plaque and tartar
  • Polishing your teeth
  • Flossing between your teeth
  • Reviewing recommended brushing and flossing techniques

Once your examination and cleaning have been performed, they’ll tell you about the health of your teeth and gums and then make any additional recommendations. It’s important that you see your dentist every six months and that they give you routine examination and cleaning. Remember, by seeing your dentist on a regular basis and following daily good oral hygiene practices at home, you are more likely to keep your teeth and  gums healthy.

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  • Do You Really Need to Go to the Dentist Every 6 Months?

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But you may be wondering, are twice-yearly dental appointments necessary to ensure oral health?

We give you our word: Seeing the dentist every six months really is important, and there are a number of reasons why.

Preventing Bigger Problems

Each routine dental appointment has two basic components. The first step is a cleaning appointment with your dental hygienist , and the second is an evaluation from your dentist.

During your appointment, your dentist will take a careful look not only at your teeth but also at surrounding soft tissues, including your gums and your tongue. Your dentist will also check your bite and the alignment of your jaw.

This in-depth evaluation is important because you may have the early signs of an oral health problem. Not all oral health issues cause pain, at least not initially, so you may not be aware that there is even a problem. By identifying these issues early, your dentist can propose prompt treatment, or even outline simple changes to your oral health routine, that allow you to avoid greater problems or more complicated interventions down the road.

Without regular trips to the dentist, you run the risk of these oral health problems going undetected and untreated until it is too late to take preventative action. And many of the oral health problems we are talking about can become quite serious when not promptly addressed. Oral cancer is just one example.

Removing Tartar and Plaque

Another reason why routine dental visits are so important is that they involve cleanings. Remember that tartar and plaque are constantly accumulating on your teeth and along your gums. Brushing and flossing can minimize this accumulation, but they cannot completely prevent it.

Your dental hygienist can perform a more robust and thorough cleaning, preventing the buildup of tartar and plaque. By keeping tartar and plaque to a minimum, you can usually avoid the need for more aggressive and time-intensive cleanings, such as scaling and planing. You can also prevent the proliferation of tartar and plaque along the gum lines, which, when left untreated, can result in periodontal disease. This disease may cause your gums to recede, a condition your dentist may address with surgery.

What Happens if You Avoid the Dentist?

When you avoid your twice-yearly dental appointments, there are potentially short-term and long-term consequences. In the short term, it simply means that your teeth will not be as clean, as white, and as fresh-looking as they could be. In the long term, it may mean a greater risk for serious oral health problems, ranging from tumors and cysts to gum disease, and the need for more invasive or complicated treatments. Finally, when you avoid the dentist, you do not have the peace of mind that comes from getting a clean bill of oral health.

When was the last time you saw the dentist? If you live in Mesa, AZ and are overdue, we would love to have you in for an appointment. Contact Snow Family Dentistry at your next opportunity.

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Why Should I Visit My Dentist Every 6 Months?

  • Modern Family Dental Care
  • December 14, 2017
  • Family Dental Care , General Dentistry

In addition to hearing dentists say “Open wide,” the other thing you’ll often hear us say is “I’ll see you again in 6 months.”

And this leads to one of the questions I often hear: “Do I really need to visit the dentist every 6 months?”

Yes. You do.

During your regular dental check-ups, your teeth are cleaned to help prevent gum disease. When plaque and tartar have a chance to build-up, they can eat away at the tissue of the gum. If this issue escalates, it can cause the tooth to begin to pull away from the gum and lead to breakdown of not only your gums but also the bone that holds your teeth in place. Your best option is to have your teeth cleaned regularly to prevent this issue entirely.

Also, your dentist can check for problems that you may not see or feel. Many dental issues don’t become visible or cause pain until they are in more advanced stages. And finding something late often means more drastic measures are needed to fix the problem. This means that your mouth and your bank account could be feeling the effects of your delayed dental visits.

Really, just think about the dental problems that you could encounter and how finding the problem early will be easier — and cheaper — to fix. Cavities, gum disease, oral cancer etc. These are all things where regular visits allow your dentist to find early signs of disease and begin treatment before things get worse.

In addition, if you have a pre-disposition to oral issues you might need to visit your dentist more often than every 6 months. This includes things like if you’re pregnant, a smoker, diabetic, have gum disease, a history of cavities, or a weak immune system. If any of these conditions sound familiar to you, be sure to talk to your dentist about more frequent visits.

So, the next time your dentist says “I’ll see you in 6 months,” just tell your dentist that you’ll be there, and that you promise to floss every day.

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visit dentist every 6 months

Why You Should Visit Your Dentist Every 6 Months

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The majority of people do not enjoy having to sit in the dentist’s chair, but making consistent appointments with your dentist confirms that your teeth stay in perfect condition. The American Dental Association advises that you go to your dentist at least once a year, but going every 6 months will help prevent a whole range of oral-related issues from developing, some of these issues include tooth decay and gum disease. Here are five great points on why you should go see your dentist every six months.

No Tooth Decay!

Dentists are able to quickly discover and treat tooth decay before it’s too late, the condition of your teeth can worsen every 6 months or so due to the plaque that builds up and damages your teeth, by visiting regularly you can get advice on how to prevent tooth decay from occurring. If this is left untreated, the condition causes incredible pain and dental cavities, along with inflamed gums.

Plaque is a sticky deposit that latches on to your teeth and gum line which is infested with bacteria. When you get more plaque it produces tartar, which gives your teeth a different color. It is advised to visit your dentist every 6 months to prevent the build-up of plaque.

Stopping Gum Diseases

Dentists’ are able to discover the first signs of gum disease quickly, and are able to address the issue effectively if discovered early. If it’s left untreated, your gums will become red and infected, which will make it difficult to consume food or drinks. Because of this, we highly recommend visiting your local dentist every 6 months.

By regularly visiting your dentist, you’re saving money on the potential disaster that can occur by not looking after your mouth, gum disease and tooth decay are expensive procedures, by visiting your dentist you are able to know your teeth’s condition, and any emerging problems that can be fixed quickly.

Smile More!

By visiting your dentist every 6 months, your teeth will be in the best possible condition, show off that great smile! Your white, glimmering teeth are something to be proud of.

At Vitarelli Dental , we are a local dentist based in NJ, get in touch to see how we can help today!

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visit dentist every 6 months

Visit Your Dentist Every 6 Months

November 18, 2016.

Your dentist for preventive care.

Prevent Gum Disease

Even those who have the best home oral hygiene routines need to visit the dentist twice a year. Brushing and flossing at home are not enough to prevent periodontal disease, better known as gum disease. Even with proper brushing and flossing, plaque and tarter will accumulate around the gum line. When these accumulations are not removed, the gums will become infected.

Often, people do not notice the early signs of gum disease, which is easily treatable and reversible. As a result, the infection intensifies and spreads. When left untreated, tooth loss can eventually occur. Not to mention, gum disease is directly linked to causing serious overall health complications.

By visiting your dentist regularly, we are able to prevent the development of gum disease. Plus, we can detect gum disease in its early stages to prevent additional damage by treating the infection.

Reduce Future Dental Problems

Often, people do not visit the dentist until after a problem as developed. As a result, invasive and costly procedures are needed. In some cases, the damage may have become too severe and we will not be able to save a tooth from extraction. However, with a regular checkup and cleaning , we will detect complications while they are still small and, in some cases, we can even prevent the problem all together.

Early Detection

Regular appointments to the dentist offer early detection for an array of complications, not just gum disease or tooth decay. With regular examinations, we are able to detect serious health complications, such as oral cancer, osteoporosis, and even gastroesophageal reflux disease. Many oral health problems can be the result of a medical condition. While the symptoms of the medical condition may not yet be present, signs of the condition can begin to appear with your oral health.

Maintain Oral Health

Regular appointments to the dentist will help ensure the health of your teeth over the course of your lifetime. With the right care, you will promote your oral health by preventing many damaging complications, such as gum disease and tooth decay. We provide interventions and treatments to protect your teeth from damage before it even starts.

Where is a Dentist Near Me?

It is never too late to make your oral health a priority. If you have not been to the dentist recently, we encourage you to schedule an appointment right away. By visiting the dentist twice a year, you will help to ensure your smile stays healthy and beautiful while you protect your overall health. Contact our office today to schedule an appointment for preventive care.

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Abington Center for Cosmetic & Family Dentistry

Do I Really Need to Go to the Dentist Every 6 Months?

You are currently viewing Do I Really Need to Go to the Dentist Every 6 Months?

  • Post published: April 12, 2022

The rule of thumb for how often you should go to the dentist is twice a year or every 6 months. However, multiple factors tie into the more realistic answer, including dental history, oral hygiene habits, and risk factors.

As many will say: it’s better to be proactive than reactive. In other words, those who go to the dentist regularly are more likely to catch onto potential problems sooner and use preventative measures than those who only go to the dentist when they’re in pain or notice a problem. Fixing the focus on preventing issues as opposed to repairing ones will, in the long run, save you time, money, and pain.

The CDC ’s statistics from 2015-2018 show that 13.2% of children aged 5-19 and a whopping 25.9% of adults aged 20-44 have untreated tooth decay. Additionally, in 2019, only 64.9% of adults aged 18 and over had been to the dentist within the last year.

High-Risk Groups

(who may need to go to the dentist more often than every 6 months)

Note: Consult with your dentist or dental hygienist to discuss your personal oral hygiene needs and determine how often you should go to the dentist.

  • When you use tobacco products, the plaque build-up on your enamel becomes stickier and more prone to absorbing bacteria. This can lead to quicker cavities or put you at risk for periodontal disease (gum disease).

Those with certain medical conditions

  • For example, a person with diabetes is likely to carry more sugar in their saliva. This excess glucose is the perfect home for bacteria and can lead to decay and periodontal disease.

If you already have gum disease or have a history of gingivitis

If you’re prone to excess plaque or tend to get cavities.

  • Reminder: even people with good oral hygiene may be more prone to certain things due to genetics.

If you historically have a weak immune system response to bacterial infections

If you have veneers or crowns, pregnant women.

  • Hormones produced throughout pregnancy can cause changes in the acidity of saliva, and increased food intake can lead to excess sugar in the saliva: both leading to a higher risk of cavities & gingivitis. More plaque and bacteria tend to harbor due to the natural inflammatory response.

If you suffer from dry mouth

  • Saliva serves as a neutralizing agent to the acid in your mouth produced by bacteria. With a dry mouth, bacteria and acids gather up faster, leading to a risk of teeth and gum damage.
  • Those who consume alcohol frequently are more prone to suffering from dry mouth and more dental issues. Certain medications may lead to dry mouth. Consult with your doctor if you are experiencing this.
  • Receding gums, dry mouth, enamel thinning are all dental problems that may come with age, leading to an increased risk of oral disease. Oral cancer is much more common for those aged 45 and over and twice as likely for men.

Other risk factors

Avoiding the dentist when a problem arises/dental anxiety.

  • Maybe you felt a tinge of pain, or you knew something was wrong but didn’t get it checked out right away. Unfortunately, oral problems often do not go away on their own. An achy tooth can quickly lead to a whole lot of pain and even an extraction. Dental issues can even lead to problems with your jaw and digestion.

Poor oral hygiene

  • Not brushing your teeth twice a day and forgetting to floss occasionally puts you at risk of gingivitis and cavities.

Poor nutrition

  • The food we put into our bodies directly affects our oral health. Without proper nutrition, vitamins, and minerals, the health of our teeth and gums is at risk. Excess sugar can lead to tooth decay.

Stress & anxiety

  • When our bodies are stressed, our body releases a hormone that inhibits the ability of our immune system to work correctly, lessening its ability to fight off infections. This means that even if you have a seemingly minor dental issue, it can quickly worsen quite fast.

Okay… so do I need to go to the dentist every 6 months?

In general, it’s okay to assume you should be visiting the dentist twice a year. However, if you haven’t been for a cleaning for a lengthy period, it’s important to schedule one and discuss with your dentist the next steps. Even with perfect teeth brushing, flossing, nutrition habits, it’s still important to go to the dentist. Make your dentist and hygienist aware of any medical problems or potential risk factors for poor oral health, and inquire how often you should be going. If you have any tooth or gum pain, it’s best to make an appointment as soon as possible. It is possible to reverse tooth decay when it’s still in the early stages- so be proactive.

At your cleaning appointment, a hygienist will first examine your teeth to determine any visual signs of decay or gum inflammation. They’ll then remove any plaque and tartar, which will help prevent cavities, avoid bacteria growth, and even keep your smile whiter with fresher breath! X-rays may be done yearly, depending on your specific needs and maintenance.

Polishing, flossing, rinsing, fluoride…

If you have good oral hygiene, it’s almost like a spa day for your teeth! So treat yourself to a healthy and happy smile- you deserve it. –

Here at the Abington Center for Cosmetic & Family Dentistry, Dr. Charles Dennis and his team are dedicated to providing quality dental services. We understand that you have a busy life, so we choose to be open daily, Monday through Thursday, from 8 am to 5 pm, with Wednesday’s closing at 8 pm. Friday’s & Saturday’s are dedicated to providing appointments by emergency only.

If you’re looking to schedule a cleaning or find a family dentist near Scranton, PA, call our office today at (570) 587-4031, or use our online booking system .

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Best Life

What Happens to Your Teeth If You Don't Visit the Dentist Every Six Months

Posted: May 1, 2023 | Last updated: June 30, 2023

<p>Essential functions such as eating, drinking, breathing, and speaking all hinge on <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://bestlifeonline.com/dentist-recommendations/">good oral health</a>. And yet, many people don't realize that how you care for your teeth has even farther-reaching implications: Poor oral health has been linked to a wide range of health problems including <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://bestlifeonline.com/heart-health-warning-signs-news/">cardiovascular disease</a>, pregnancy complications, cognitive decline, and more.</p><p>Besides daily brushing and flossing, visiting your dentist every six months is another key way to ensure your oral health is in tip-top shape. Routine cleanings and exams can help you avoid serious—not to mention expensive—dental health issues, experts say. Read on to learn what happens to your teeth if you don't visit the dentist every six months, and to find out why skipping your appointment for too long could come with life-threatening consequences.</p><p><p><strong>READ THIS NEXT: </strong><strong><a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://bestlifeonline.com/news-brushing-teeth-rinse/">Never Do This After Brushing Your Teeth, Dentists Warn</a>.</strong></p></p>

Essential functions such as eating, drinking, breathing, and speaking all hinge on good oral health . And yet, many people don't realize that how you care for your teeth has even farther-reaching implications: Poor oral health has been linked to a wide range of health problems including cardiovascular disease , pregnancy complications, cognitive decline, and more.

Besides daily brushing and flossing, visiting your dentist every six months is another key way to ensure your oral health is in tip-top shape. Routine cleanings and exams can help you avoid serious—not to mention expensive—dental health issues, experts say. Read on to learn what happens to your teeth if you don't visit the dentist every six months, and to find out why skipping your appointment for too long could come with life-threatening consequences.

READ THIS NEXT: Never Do This After Brushing Your Teeth, Dentists Warn .

<p>Going to the dentist every six months is an important part of your <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://bestlifeonline.com/dont-brush-teeth-at-night-news/">oral health care</a>—in no small part because it helps prevent tooth decay. "Plaque can be removed by brushing and flossing, but over time, some plaque may develop into tartar, which can only be removed by a dentist or dental hygienist," says <strong>Jennifer Silver</strong>, DDS, a dentist with <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://macleodtraildental.ca/">Macleod Trail Dental</a> in Calgary, Canada. "Tartar accumulation can contribute to tooth decay and periodontal disease if left untreated," she adds. Silver notes that when plaque and tartar accumulate on teeth, bacteria can begin to erode the enamel, resulting in cavities.<strong>Yenile Pinto</strong>, DDS, a dentist and the owner of <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://www.deering-dental.com/">Deering Dental</a> in Miami, Florida points out that the bacteria that leads to tooth decay can spread from one tooth to another, causing widespread dental problems. "This is why it's so common to have several cavities on the same side and many times the affected teeth will all be next to each other. Keeping your regular visits not only helps remove this bacteria which reduces your odds of having decay in the first place, but it also gives you a chance to spot these problems early on before they spread to more teeth," she tells <em>Best Life</em>.<p><strong>READ THIS NEXT: <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://bestlifeonline.com/news-antiseptic-mouthwash-teeth/">This Common Bathroom Habit Is a "Disaster" for Your Teeth, Dentist Warns</a>.</strong></p></p>

You may experience tooth decay.

READ THIS NEXT: This Common Bathroom Habit Is a "Disaster" for Your Teeth, Dentist Warns .

<p>If you don't visit the dentist every six months, you may also be at higher risk of gum disease, or periodontitis, Silver warns. Known to damage the soft tissue around teeth, gum disease can ultimately erode the bones supporting the teeth "which can result in tooth loss and other health issues if left untreated," she says.</p><p>Think it can't happen to you? <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://www.cdc.gov/oralhealth/fast-facts/tooth-loss/index.html">Tooth loss</a> is a surprisingly prevalent problem across the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Over one-quarter of adults over the age of 65 have eight or fewer teeth, while one-sixth of adults in that age range have lost all of their teeth.</p>

You may be more likely to experience tooth loss.

If you don't visit the dentist every six months, you may also be at higher risk of gum disease, or periodontitis, Silver warns. Known to damage the soft tissue around teeth, gum disease can ultimately erode the bones supporting the teeth "which can result in tooth loss and other health issues if left untreated," she says.

Think it can't happen to you? Tooth loss is a surprisingly prevalent problem across the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Over one-quarter of adults over the age of 65 have eight or fewer teeth, while one-sixth of adults in that age range have lost all of their teeth.

<p>When you go too long between dental visits, you run the risk of <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/halitosis-bad-breath">developing halitosis</a>—the main symptom of which is bad breath. "Without correct and regular brushing and flossing, and routine dental exams, food remains in the mouth," explain experts from Johns Hopkins Medicine. "This is a breeding ground for bacteria. Food that collects on the teeth, gums, and tongue may rot. This causes an unpleasant odor and taste in the mouth."</p><p>If you experience ongoing bad breath, it's important for you to see your dentist in order to help rule out any possible <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/bad-breath-what-causes-it-and-what-to-do-about-it-2019012115803">underlying conditions</a>. These can include kidney disease, diabetes, tonsillitis, certain respiratory infections, gastrointestinal problems, and more.<p><strong>For more health news sent directly to your inbox, <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://bestlifeonline.com/newsletters/">sign up for our daily newsletter</a>.</strong></p></p>

You may develop bad breath.

When you go too long between dental visits, you run the risk of developing halitosis —the main symptom of which is bad breath. "Without correct and regular brushing and flossing, and routine dental exams, food remains in the mouth," explain experts from Johns Hopkins Medicine. "This is a breeding ground for bacteria. Food that collects on the teeth, gums, and tongue may rot. This causes an unpleasant odor and taste in the mouth."

For more health news sent directly to your inbox, sign up for our daily newsletter .

<p>A smile goes a long way, but a white one might go even further.</p><p>According to a 2014 study published in the <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.1111/joor.12194"><em>Journal of Oral Rehabilitation</em></a>, the condition of a person's teeth is highly associated with their perceived attractiveness.</p><p>The researchers also found that lightening a person's tooth color was the change most likely to cause others to perceive their teeth as attractive.</p>

Your teeth may become more discolored.

When you skip dental appointments, you skip the deep cleanings that help prevent tooth discoloration. "Certain foods, beverages, and behaviors (such as smoking) can discolor teeth over time. Regular cleanings and examinations can aid in preventing or minimizing these blemishes," says Silver.

Establishing good dental health habits at home can also help prevent tooth discoloration. Brushing twice a day with a dentist-approved whitening toothpaste and flossing daily are a great place to start. Additionally, you should limit your intake of foods and beverages that are known to stain teeth, such as coffee, soda, tea, juice, and red wine. Quitting smoking can also help prevent tobacco stains on your teeth—not to mention reduce your risk of oral cancer.

<p>One of the most important things your dentist does during a checkup is something you may not even notice: screening for signs of oral cancer. "Most people aren't aware of this, but a standard part of your dental exam is an oral cancer screening," explains Pinto, who says that the process involves carefully examining the gums and soft tissue of the mouth to identify any suspicious spots or lesions.</p><p>"I've had several patients come in that presented discoloration and abnormalities that concerned me and prescribed a biopsy in order to rule out cancer," she says, adding that early detection is key, and that skipping your appointment could have a "significantly negative impact on your health."</p><p>To this point, if you notice any symptoms of oral cancer between appointments, don't wait until your next checkup to have them examined, experts warn. Some <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/mouth-cancer/symptoms-causes/syc-20350997">symptoms of oral cancer</a> include "a lip or mouth sore that doesn't heal, a white or reddish patch on the inside of your mouth, loose teeth, a growth or lump inside your mouth, mouth pain, ear pain, and difficulty or pain while swallowing, opening your mouth or chewing," explains the Mayo Clinic. Speak with your doctor or dentist to learn more about screening for oral cancer.<em>Best Life offers the most up-to-date information from top experts, new research, and health agencies, but our content is not meant to be a substitute for professional guidance. When it comes to the medication you're taking or any other health questions you have, always consult your healthcare provider directly.</em></p><p>Read the original article on <a rel="noopener noreferrer external nofollow" href="https://bestlifeonline.com/what-happens-dont-visit-dentist-every-six-months/"><em>Best Life</em></a>.</p>

You'll fall behind on screening for oral cancer.

One of the most important things your dentist does during a checkup is something you may not even notice: screening for signs of oral cancer. "Most people aren't aware of this, but a standard part of your dental exam is an oral cancer screening," explains Pinto, who says that the process involves carefully examining the gums and soft tissue of the mouth to identify any suspicious spots or lesions.

"I've had several patients come in that presented discoloration and abnormalities that concerned me and prescribed a biopsy in order to rule out cancer," she says, adding that early detection is key, and that skipping your appointment could have a "significantly negative impact on your health."

To this point, if you notice any symptoms of oral cancer between appointments, don't wait until your next checkup to have them examined, experts warn. Some symptoms of oral cancer include "a lip or mouth sore that doesn't heal, a white or reddish patch on the inside of your mouth, loose teeth, a growth or lump inside your mouth, mouth pain, ear pain, and difficulty or pain while swallowing, opening your mouth or chewing," explains the Mayo Clinic. Speak with your doctor or dentist to learn more about screening for oral cancer. Best Life offers the most up-to-date information from top experts, new research, and health agencies, but our content is not meant to be a substitute for professional guidance. When it comes to the medication you're taking or any other health questions you have, always consult your healthcare provider directly.

Read the original article on Best Life .

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5 reasons to visit your dentist every 6 months.

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Top reasons why patients don’t go to the dentist

Source: American Dental Association – Oral Health and Well-Being in the United States

In this post, we will tackle why most patients are hesitant to go to the dentist and the health and financial benefits they miss out on by doing so. We also provided some tips so you can develop a habit out of your regular dental checkups. 

5 reasons why you must visit your dentist every 6 months

Most of the time, patients only remember to visit their dentist when they experience pain and discomfort. But beyond the pain, there are more complex reasons why you should visit your dentist as frequently as possible:

If you have a dental benefits plan from your employer, you can save on preventive care with full coverage and 50% coverage for fillings . It also pays to use your dental benefits plan early so you can outsmart the frequency limitations set by most dental insurance providers.

Stay ahead of disease-causing bacteria and save on dental costs by scheduling an appointment now

Most patients only realize the value of oral health when they are already experiencing the perils of dental problems. We hope that you will not become one of them. Let our dental team help you get started with your annual dental checkup. 

Soft Touch Dental provides comprehensive dental services in Florissant, MO . Time is our greatest treasure. So, use it wisely by having preventive dental care that your future self will thank you for. Schedule your treatment now and let our team take care of your oral health. 

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visit dentist every 6 months

Why Should You Visit A Dentist Every Six Months?

Posted on August 9, 2017

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Reasons to visit the dentist every six months:

Early diagnosis of tooth decay The primary reason to visit your dentist regularly is to avoid dental issues such as dental cavities and gum problems. These issues may seem minor at first, but they can lead to more serious problems and even major dental concerns if they are not addressed early. So, regular visits can help you in the diagnosis and treatment of these conditions. Early treatment will save you both time and cost.

Clean teeth You probably work hard to remember to brush twice a day and to floss daily. Sometimes, that isn’t enough. A car needs gasoline and proper maintenance every 5000-1000 miles. Your mouth is much more complex and important than your car! For proper oral health and hygiene, you must brush and floss the correct way. Your dental hygienist or dentist can show you the proper way to brush. They are trained to help you brush and floss effectively to maintain your dental health. A healthy set of teeth is a crucial part of enhancing your appearance. Your maintenance visits will remove hard build-ups that cannot be removed with flossing and brushing at home.

Diagnosis of severe dental disease The National Institutes of Health report that over 30,000 Americans suffer from oral cancer each year. Fortunately, early diagnosis of dental diseases such as oral cancer can help save your life. Your dentist will conduct an oral cancer screening during your regular six-month visit. Oral cancer is known to spread quickly, but can be easily countered if detected early. The risk of cancer is higher when you are a smoker, or if you chew tobacco.

Gum disease Certain nutritional habits may lead to gum disease which can expose healthy teeth to tooth loss and other serious health ailments. Regular dental visits will allow the dentist to diagnose gum problems early on. Some gum issues can be reversed if caught early enough.

Ignoring dental problems allows them time to spread and become more serious. Proper care of your teeth and gums will keep them healthier your whole life. Consider scheduling an appointment with your dentist now. Recent medical studies have linked some major diseases to gum disease. Dental disease is suspected of contributing to heart disease, pancreatic cancer and stroke, just to name a few.

Regular maintenance is the key!

Visiting your dentist twice a year will help make your teeth healthy, but can also save you money and time in the long run.

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Why Visit a Dentist Every Six Months?

  • March 19, 2019 September 22, 2021

Visiting a dentist every six months is a vital practice in keeping the oral health in check. While a dentist may recommend more or less frequent dental visits, the checkup oral health problems to be caught early. As a result, they can decide on an immediate form of treatment before the development of the problem worsens and costs more.

Are X-rays Every Visit?

The frequency of dental X-rays depends on a person’s dental health . A person may not require X-rays every time he or she visits the dentist if they have not had  cavities  for years. But if the dentist keeps track of the progress of the patient’s dental issue, they may need X-rays on a more frequent basis.

Dental X-rays come with a much lower risk of radiation today. These offer invaluable insight into a person’s dental health, preventing minor issues from becoming serious ones. If you are uncertain about why you need to have an X-ray done, always feel free to ask your dentist.

What to Expect During Your Appointment

Tooth decay is just one of the problems that dental professionals will examine when a patient visits them. The appointment may also comprise of:

  • Neck, jaw, and head examination. The dentist will examine for anything unusual.
  • Gum evaluation. Periodontal disease and other gum-related problems are checked.
  • Mouth checkup. The dentist will examine for signs of oral cancer, diabetes, and vitamin deficiencies.
  • Some dental professionals will perform a checkup on a patient’s face, bite, saliva, and lower jaw joints’ movement.

For children, a routine check-up is essential for monitoring the growth of their teeth. This is especially crucial for the eruption of the permanent teeth. A child’s primary teeth serve as the foundation for the adult teeth. When the baby teeth fall out earlier than usual, it can lead to problems with the bite and spacing of the permanent teeth. This can, therefore, cause malocclusion or crooked teeth. Moreover, a child’s teeth play an essential role in the biting, chewing, and speaking function.

For adults, a routine check-up is also imperative as oral health problems like gum disease can affect our overall health. After all, the condition of one’s oral health can affect the overall well-being and quality of life.

Additionally, as we age, our teeth also age. Therefore, taking extra care of them will help us save our natural teeth in our later years, keeping the function of our teeth as well.

6 Changes You Can Make For Healthier Teeth

Many people mistake healthy teeth for being high maintenance. This is not always the case.

There are many changes you can make in your daily life now that will soon bring you healthier, prettier pearly whites without having to resort to cosmetic dentistry .

#1 Stop with the bad brushing habits

Whether you brush too quick and rough or lightly brush your teeth for a long period of time, know that your pearly whites need something a little more in between to ensure healthy teeth.

Brushing too fast or rough leads to enamel deterioration which in turn can lead to cavities and tooth sensitivity .

Brushing too softly means plaque and food particles aren’t properly getting removed from your teeth. Start brushing right.

Brush for two minutes, twice a day . Don’t brush too quickly or too softly; apply the perfect amount of pressure. If your gums are bleeding or mouth is in pain after brushing, or if your teeth are still gritty afterward, you’re doing it wrong.

Remember, the proper brushing reduces the risk of discolored teeth , bad breath (halitosis) , and other oral-related issues.

#2 Munch on healthy snacks

Fruits, veggies, nuts, cheese, and sugarless yogurt make for great healthy snacks. Healthy foods are full of vitamins and minerals important to build strong, healthy teeth

Dairy products, in particular, contain healthy bacteria (probiotics) great in fighting oral bacteria and offer calcium to strengthen teeth and bones. Eating snacks throughout the day also increases saliva flow helpful in washing away excess food particles and bacteria. This also prevents dry mouth .

#3 Reduce your intake of sugary foods and drinks

The more sugar you intake, the more oral (and general) bacteria that will be present in your body.

This means a higher risk of many oral-related diseases and conditions such as gum disease  in severe cases.

Keep your mouth happy and healthy by limiting the amount of sugar you consume.

#4 Drink more water

Drinking more water reduces dry mouth, bad breath, and buildup of oral bacteria and food particles.

Keeping hydrated throughout the day is a fairly simple task healthy in more ways than one.

#5 Start chewing sugarless gum after eating

Chewing gum (with no added sugar) is a great and simple way to ensure healthier teeth.

This promotes saliva production, a lessened risk of dry mouth, cleaner teeth with less oral bacteria and less food stuck between the teeth, and offers more desirable breath.

It’s also been said that gum is healthy in strengthening the jaw bone thanks to consistent chewing.

#6 Don’t be lazy about your teeth

Most of all, don’t be lazy about your teeth. Whether this means skipping out on flossing, avoiding dental visits because you’re “too busy,” or only brushing your teeth once a day, one should not be lazy when it comes to their oral health.

Even something as simple as not brushing your teeth for one full day can cause potential for oral issues in the future.

Another lazy habit people have with their teeth is avoiding going to the dentist if a problem arises. Tooth pain, cavities, and gum inflammation are just some of the things people look offer and avoid asking or going to a dentist to ensure everything is okay.

Don’t do this. Bad habits like these are easy to acquire, so avoid them before they start.

Always take the extra precautions when it comes to your oral health. After all, consistent neglect will lead to issues sooner than you think and even other issues throughout your body eventually. It’s more serious than it seems.

Did You Know Eating Cheese Can Lead to a Healthier Smile?

According to the study published in an issue of General Dentistry of the Academy of General Dentistry, the dairy product is useful in the protection of the teeth against acid erosion, or the breakdown of the outer layer of the teeth called enamel.

The study looked at the dental plaque pH of 68 subjects ages 12 to 15 before and after their consumption of milk, sugar-free yogurt, or cheese. The 68 individuals were grouped randomly among different products. They were then asked to consume their assigned product for three minutes and washed away with water. Researchers tested the pH level of each subject’s mouth and measured at 10, 20, and 30 minutes after consumption.

They then found that milk and yogurt showed no changes in the pH levels of the subjects, while cheese showed an increase in pH level at a rapid pace at each time interval.According to the researchers, two factors make cheese beneficial to oral health.

#1 It Causes Salivation

Saliva is significant in maintaining oral health and in reducing oral health problems like dental caries and oral infections. It functions as a lubricant, for dilution of sugars after food and drinks intake, antimicrobial and cleansing activity and tissue repair.

Saliva also acts as a neutralizing agent and helps in restoring pH levels in the mouth after eating. It also prevents halitosis or bad breath caused by dry mouth or xerostomia.

#2 It Has Casein Phosphate

Another factor why cheese is good for oral health is because of the teeth-strengthening casein phosphate contained in cheese. Casein phosphate lowers the acidity in the mouth and makes it resistant to decay. Cheese is also rich in calcium, which helps put back minerals in teeth that might have been lost due to other foods.

A whole wheel of cheese is not needed to be devoured to enjoy the benefits of cheese to oral health. It only takes one-third ounce serving or about a third of a slice. The fat content in cheese is not related to its benefits, meaning low-fat varieties will give the same benefits as those high in fat.

Other than Cheese: Foods For Your Healthiest Smile

Aside from cheese, fiber-rich fruits and vegetables are suitable for the teeth. According to the American Dental Association, fiber-rich foods have a detergent effect in the mouth and cause salivation.

Green and black teas have polyphenols that either kill or hold back bacteria, preventing them from growing or producing acid. However, teas can stain teeth that it is advisable to drink water afterward and undergo teeth cleaning regularly. Sugarless gum can also aid in producing saliva to remove food particles from the mouth. Food with fluoride helps the teeth by preventing cavities.

Along with proper diet and avoiding activities like smoking, dentists also recommend brushing teeth, flossing, and regularly visiting the dentist for good oral health.

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Why should you visit the dentist every six months?

author-479257930

Updated Jul 27, 2022, 02:46 PM IST

dentist

It is important to visit the dentist every six months to get checked for various teeth ailments and gum diseases

  • Review and update
  • Oral cancer screening
  • Teeth whitening
  • Blood pressure check-up
  • Checking for cavities and fillers
  • x-ray for teeth and root health
  • Screening for infections
  • Oral prophylaxis or full mouth cleaning
  • Why visit a dentist every six months?
  • Gum diseases: There are a lot of diseases and ailments that crop up in your mouth with no or very few symptoms. And unless you see a dentist, these will not be diagnosed or treated but can lead to many underlying conditions. For example, gum Infections or shaky teeth.
  • Tooth decay: We all face the problem of tooth decay, which happens due to the various foods we eat. Tooth decay can be treated with various procedures like surgery or medicines.
  • Plaque: It is a sticky, black-coloured deposit on the teeth and along the gums filled with harmful bacteria. Plaque causes teeth discolouration, gum infections, tooth infections, tooth breakage, and severe pain. A dentist can treat plaque well in time if you visit every six months.
  • Smile correction: There are many treatments like jaw surgery, teeth straightening, and smile correction that can be done by visiting your dentist regularly.

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Reason To Go To A Dentist Every Six Months

visit dentist every 6 months

When did you last go to the dentist? Most people completely understand the importance of going to the dentist regularly. Taking care of your teeth is one of the best things you can do for your health. Because of this, it’s a good idea to go to the dentist in Duncanville every six months. Some dentists say that going to the dentist once a year is fine, but going every six months is one of the best ways to ensure your oral health.

Dental Checkups At Duncanville Will Keep Your Teeth  Healthy

A checkup at the dentist every six months is essential for a person’s overall health. Even though most people don’t like going to the dentist, those who don’t get their teeth checked regularly may regret this choice. People who don’t go to the dentist often risk their oral health, which can lead to other health problems.

Did You Know That Gum Disease Can Be Stopped At Any Time?

Four main reasons why you should get a checkup every six months. Everyone should go to the dentist every six months instead of once a year for the following reasons:

1. Plaque And Tartar

Even if we brush and floss our teeth three times a day, there are some spots in our mouths that we can’t get to. Plaque and tartar tend to build up in these places, so they must be cleaned as soon as possible for good oral health. Plaque and tartar can cause gum disease and tooth decay, harming your health.

A dental X-ray lets a dentist see problems with the teeth or gums that can’t be seen with the naked eye. Fixing potential dental issues as soon as possible is much easier, less painful, and less expensive.

3. A Check For Oral Cancer

Oral cancer can happen to anyone, but people who smoke and drink a lot are more likely to get it. If you find oral cancer early, you have a better chance of beating it. When oral cancer is found early , it has the best chance of being cured. We can look for signs of oral cancer and, if needed, point people in the right direction for treatment.

4. Prevent Bad Habits

Patients who smoke, clench their jaw, grind their teeth, chew on ice, eat a lot of sweets, drink coffee or red wine, or brush their teeth too hard need to come to our office. We can help patients understand how harmful these habits are for them and suggest ways to deal with them.

Prevention Is The Most Important Thing

Regarding your oral health, it’s best to be proactive. Getting regular checkups with us is not only the best way to take care of your dental hygiene, but it is also a must if you want to avoid oral diseases. Even if you do everything right and have had good dental health for a long time, you can still benefit from dental checkups. There are places in the mouth that you can’t reach with a toothbrush or floss. Lucky for us, we can.

Do visit Village Family Dental in Duncanville,Dallas for the best overall preventive dental care in the Dallas area .

Village Family Dental

Author: Village Family Dental

Dr. Paul Hung of Village Family Dental - Dentist in Duncanville has been serving in and around Dallas for more than a few years now. Read more View all posts by Village Family Dental

Village Family Dental

Why Visit Dentist Every 6 Months?

When you visit the dentist every six months, they have the opportunity to carefully evaluate the state of your teeth and gums. During this examination, they gather detailed information that can be compared to your previous visit. This comparison enables them to determine if there have been any changes in your dental health and, if so, what might have caused them.

Is it really necessary to go to the dentist every 6 months?

Regular dental checkups are crucial for keeping your teeth and gums healthy. According to the American Dental Association, it is recommended to visit the dentist at least once a year. However, scheduling an appointment every six months can help prevent a range of oral issues. By staying proactive with your dental care, you can maintain a beautiful and healthy smile.

Why does my dentist want to see me every 6 months?

One of the reasons why it is recommended to visit the dentist more frequently is to ensure preventive measures can be taken. Teeth are susceptible to various issues like decay or infections, which can be challenging to prevent entirely. By going to the dentist more often than just twice a year, individuals can benefit from additional preventive measures. These measures can help in safeguarding the teeth from potential damage and maintaining good oral health.

What happens if you don’t go to the dentist every 6 months?

Regular dental care is crucial for maintaining overall health. Neglecting oral hygiene not only puts you at risk for tooth and gum diseases, but it can also lead to various health issues in other parts of your body. Extensive research has shown a strong connection between oral health and conditions like heart disease, diabetes, stroke, and even breast cancer. By prioritizing regular visits to the dentist and practicing good oral hygiene, you can significantly reduce the chances of developing these serious health conditions.

Can tooth decay develop in 6 months?

The formation time of a cavity can vary greatly, typically ranging from six months to four or five years before it necessitates treatment. However, the exact duration differs from person to person due to the ever-changing conditions of one’s mouth on a daily basis.

At what age do your teeth start decaying?

Did you know that tooth decay can actually start as soon as a baby’s teeth come in, which is typically around six months of age? This fact often surprises parents, but it’s important to be aware of it. If left untreated, decay in baby teeth can lead to pain and even infection. In some cases, the infection can spread and cause further complications. Additionally, if decay is not addressed, it can ultimately result in the destruction of the baby teeth.

It’s worth noting that tooth decay doesn’t just impact oral health; it can also have an effect on a child’s overall well-being. So, it’s crucial to prioritize dental care from an early age to ensure a healthy smile and a healthy body.

What age is tooth decay most common?

Among children aged 6 to 8 years, a significant number, specifically 52%, have experienced the presence of a cavity in their primary (baby) teeth. It is worth noting that children from low-income families are twice as likely to have untreated cavities compared to their higher-income counterparts. Moving on to adolescents aged 12 to 19, the statistics are even more alarming, with over half, precisely 57%, having encountered a cavity in their permanent teeth. These figures highlight the prevalence of dental issues among young individuals and emphasize the need for proper oral hygiene practices and access to dental care.

What decays teeth the fastest?

From this groundbreaking experiment, we have uncovered some fascinating findings regarding the impact of different beverages on tooth decay. Surprisingly, it was found that Coca Cola has the most detrimental effect on teeth, causing them to decay at a faster rate compared to other drinks. Coming in second place was apple juice, which contains natural sugars that can also contribute to tooth decay. These results shed light on the importance of being mindful of our beverage choices and their potential effects on our dental health.

Why are my teeth decaying so fast?

It’s important to understand that the development of plaque and tartar on your teeth is often a result of consuming excessive sugars and starches, as well as inadequate oral hygiene practices. When these sugars and starches are not properly cleaned off your teeth, bacteria thrive on them and create plaque. If this plaque is not removed, it can harden into tartar, which can accumulate both above and below your gum line. This buildup of tartar can lead to various dental issues and should be addressed through regular dental care.

How many cavities does average person have?

In general, adults tend to develop an average of three cavities throughout their lifetime. As a result, it is common for the average adult to have three or four fillings in their mouth. However, the number of fillings can vary depending on the level of dental care individuals provide for their teeth. In some cases, patients may even end up with ten or more fillings if they do not take proper care of their oral health.

Why do I get so many cavities even though I brush?

While maintaining good oral hygiene through regular brushing and flossing is crucial for preventing cavities, it is still possible to develop them. There are several factors that can contribute to the formation of cavities, such as the presence of tight spaces between teeth that easily trap food particles, excessive consumption of cavity-causing foods and beverages, and neglecting regular professional cleanings and checkups.

Why am I so prone to cavities?

A diet that is rich in sugar and other simple carbohydrates can contribute to the growth of bacteria in our mouths. These bacteria produce acid that can erode the enamel on our teeth, leading to an increased risk of cavities. However, we have the power to reduce this risk by “starving” these bacteria. By cutting back on sugars and other simple carbs in our diets, we can limit the food source for these bacteria, ultimately helping to protect our teeth and prevent cavities.

Why are my teeth getting so many cavities?

Sugary and starchy snacks can have a negative impact on our dental health, as they contribute to tooth decay. However, sugary drinks like cola, sweet tea, energy drinks, and sports drinks are even more harmful. To reduce your risk of cavities, it is important to maintain a balanced diet and avoid consuming these sugary beverages. By making healthier choices and cutting back on sugary drinks, you can take proactive steps towards protecting your teeth and maintaining good oral hygiene.

Do dentists judge you for having cavities?

It’s crucial to keep in mind that dentists choose their profession to assist people, not to pass judgment on them. Their goal is to provide help and support, regardless of the condition of your oral health. A skilled dentist will never make you feel ashamed or embarrassed about your dental situation.

What do dentists do if you have a lot of cavities?

Fillings, also known as restorations, are the primary solution for treating tooth decay that has advanced beyond the initial stage. These fillings are crafted from a variety of materials, including tooth-colored composite resins, porcelain, or dental amalgam, which is a blend of different substances. Another treatment option for more severe cases is the use of crowns.

What toothpaste is best for cavities?

Toothpaste plays a crucial role in preventing cavities, and choosing the right one can make a significant difference in oral health. The best toothpaste for cavities is one that contains fluoride. Fluoride strengthens tooth enamel, making it more resistant to acid attacks from bacteria and sugars. Look for toothpaste with the American Dental Association (ADA) seal of approval, as it ensures the product has been rigorously tested for safety and effectiveness.

Additionally, consider toothpaste with added ingredients like calcium phosphate or casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate, as they can help remineralize weakened enamel. It’s also important to brush your teeth twice a day for two minutes each time and to visit your dentist regularly for check-ups and cleanings

Can you get 3 cavities in 6 months?

It may come as a surprise, but the process of cavity formation is not an overnight occurrence. In fact, it takes weeks, months, and even years for a cavity to develop. On average, most cavities take around six months to five years to fully form. The good news is that if a cavity is detected early on, it is possible to reverse the damage done to your child’s teeth.

This means that with timely intervention and proper dental care, you can help restore your child’s oral health and prevent further deterioration.

How fast does tooth decay advance?

It’s important to note that the timeline for the development of cavities can vary from person to person. In general, it can take up to five years for a cavity to fully develop and require treatment to prevent further spread. However, for some individuals, this process can occur in just a few months. Each person’s mouth is unique, so there is no standard timeline for cavity development.

Can tooth decay happen suddenly?

Causes of Sudden Cavities

If you’ve noticed cavities appearing suddenly and unexpectedly, there could be a few reasons behind it. One possible cause is sudden dietary changes. It’s possible that you’ve made alterations to your diet, such as increasing your soda intake, adding more sugar to your coffee, consuming more starchy or acidic foods, or indulging in more sweets. These dietary changes can contribute to the development of cavities in a short period of time.

Why my teeth are decaying so fast?

It’s important to understand that the main cause of dental problems is the consumption of excessive sugars and starches, coupled with inadequate oral hygiene practices. When sugars and starches are not properly removed from your teeth, bacteria thrive on them and create plaque. If this plaque is not removed, it can harden into tartar (calculus) either below or above your gum line.

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  1. Do You Really Need a Dental Checkup Every 6 Months?

    3 min read It's commonly said that you should see a dentist twice a year. When in doubt, this is a good rule of thumb to follow. But if you want to be sure about how often you need a dental...

  2. How Often You Should Go to the Dentist: Is It Really Every 6 Months

    Most adults and children should get dental check-ups every six months, according to the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM). Twice-yearly visits can help catch tooth decay or other dental problems early, before it has a chance to cause pain or other problems. Why Regular Dental Checkups Are Important

  3. How Often Should I See My Dentist

    How often should I see my dentist? The frequency at which you visit your dentist should be based on several factors. This includes your current oral health condition, individual oral hygiene habits, general health status and medical conditions, as well as your own self- and dentist-assessed risk for oral health problems.

  4. How Often Should You Go To The Dentist?

    How Often Should You Visit the Dentist? While it's true that visiting the dentist twice a year is a good rule of thumb for many people, the truth is that you have your own unique smile needs. So it depends on your oral hygiene, habits, and individual medical conditions.

  5. Is Going to the Dentist Every Six Months a Scam or Nah?

    By Maggie Lange August 18, 2016 Do I have to go to the dentist twice a year? Can I go once a year? Hello. First, I love that you're questioning everything. Skepticism is one of our greatest...

  6. What to Expect at a Dentist Visit for an Adult

    5 min read A visit to the dentist doesn't have to be something to dread. Dentists and hygienists want to help, and they'll usually try to make your office visit as easy as possible. You can...

  7. Why Should You Go to the Dentist Every 6 Months?

    It is widely known that dental check-ups are supposed to be every 6 months for both adults and children, and most professional organizations including the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) recommend so. However, have you ever wondered why it's exactly 6 months and not 4, 8, or 10? Ever asked yourself why it has to be twice per year?

  8. Why you need to visit your Dentist every 6 months

    The American Dental Association recommends a visit to the dentist at least once a year, but making an appointment once in six months prevents a host of oral related problems. Prevention is the hallmark of modern dentistry.

  9. The Importance of Regular Dental Visits

    Have you ever wondered why the American Dental Association and your dentist recommend you come back every six months? It's because regular dental visits are essential for the maintenance of healthy teeth and gums. And in between those examinations, it's important that you work to keep your teeth and gums clean and healthy.

  10. Do You Really Need to Go to the Dentist Every 6 Months?

    And, you will want to floss at least once per day, if not more. The third component is staying up-to-date with routine dental visits. For the majority of patients, we recommend seeing the dentist once every six months. But you may be wondering, are twice-yearly dental appointments necessary to ensure oral health?

  11. Why Should I Visit My Dentist Every 6 Months?

    In addition, if you have a pre-disposition to oral issues you might need to visit your dentist more often than every 6 months. This includes things like if you're pregnant, a smoker, diabetic, have gum disease, a history of cavities, or a weak immune system. If any of these conditions sound familiar to you, be sure to talk to your dentist ...

  12. Why You Should Visit Your Dentist Every 6 Months

    It is advised to visit your dentist every 6 months to prevent the build-up of plaque. Stopping Gum Diseases; Dentists' are able to discover the first signs of gum disease quickly, and are able to address the issue effectively if discovered early. If it's left untreated, your gums will become red and infected, which will make it difficult to ...

  13. Why You Need to Visit Your Dentist Every 6 Months

    Regular appointments to the dentist will help ensure the health of your teeth over the course of your lifetime. With the right care, you will promote your oral health by preventing many damaging complications, such as gum disease and tooth decay. We provide interventions and treatments to protect your teeth from damage before it even starts.

  14. Do I Really Need to Go to the Dentist Every 6 Months?

    The rule of thumb for how often you should go to the dentist is twice a year or every 6 months. However, multiple factors tie into the more realistic answer, including dental history, oral hygiene habits, and risk factors. As many will say: it's better to be proactive than reactive.

  15. Do You Really Need to Go to the Dentist Every 6 Months?

    For the general population, the consensus is to see a dentist at least once every six months. According to researchers, those who do indeed have better oral and overall health. One study,...

  16. What Happens to Your Teeth If You Don't Visit the Dentist Every Six Months

    Besides daily brushing and flossing, visiting your dentist every six months is another key way to ensure your oral health is in tip-top shape. Routine cleanings and exams can help you avoid...

  17. How Often Should You Get Your Teeth Cleaned? What to Know

    Some dentists recommend that you visit once every 6 months for a cleaning. This allows your dentist to get a look at your teeth and let you know if there's anything that needs to be...

  18. 5 Reasons To Visit Your Dentist Every 6 Months

    5 Reasons To Visit Your Dentist Every 6 Months - Soft Touch Dental 5 Reasons To Visit Your Dentist Every 6 Months About 59% of adult Americans don't visit their dentist due to dental costs. Other reasons why patients are hesitant to visit their dentist regularly include pain associated with dental treatments and dental anxiety.

  19. Why Should You Visit A Dentist Every Six Months?

    Reasons to visit the dentist every six months: Early diagnosis of tooth decay The primary reason to visit your dentist regularly is to avoid dental issues such as dental cavities and gum problems. These issues may seem minor at first, but they can lead to more serious problems and even major dental concerns if they […]

  20. Why Visit a Dentist Every Six Months?

    Visiting a dentist every six months is a vital practice in keeping the oral health in check. While a dentist may recommend more or less frequent dental visits, the checkup oral health problems to be caught early. As a result, they can decide on an immediate form of treatment before the development of the problem worsens and costs more.

  21. Why should you visit the dentist every six months?

    Most dentists recommend a visit every six months to treat oral problems that if left unchecked can cause havoc. Ashima Sharda Mahindra Updated Jul 27, 2022, 02:46 PM IST It is important to visit the dentist every six months to get checked for various teeth ailments and gum diseases New Delhi: Prevention is better than cure.

  22. Why Do You Need To Visit A Dentist Every Six Months?

    Four main reasons why you should get a checkup every six months. Everyone should go to the dentist every six months instead of once a year for the following reasons: 1. Plaque And Tartar. Even if we brush and floss our teeth three times a day, there are some spots in our mouths that we can't get to. Plaque and tartar tend to build up in these ...

  23. Why Visit Dentist Every 6 Months?

    Regular dental checkups are crucial for keeping your teeth and gums healthy. According to the American Dental Association, it is recommended to visit the dentist at least once a year. However, scheduling an appointment every six months can help prevent a range of oral issues. By staying proactive with your dental care, you can maintain a ...

  24. How Much Does Dental Work Cost?

    This could be $1,000, $2,000 or a different amount. Some policies have annual and lifetime maximum amounts for certain dental services, such as braces. Once you reach your maximum, you pay for the ...