Screen Rant

Star trek: lower decks brings back picard's nemesis vehicle.

Star Trek: Lower Decks has plenty of TNG-era tech, including the Argo, the infamous off-road vehicle Captain Picard drove in Star Trek: Nemesis.

Warning: SPOILERS for Star Trek: Lower Decks Season 1, Episode 1 - "Second Contact"

Star Trek: Lower Decks ' season premiere re-introduced the Argo, the all-terrain vehicle driven by Captain Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart) in 2002's Star Trek: Nemesis . Created by Mike McMahan ( Rick & Morty ), Star Trek: Lower Decks is the first half-hour animated comedy set in the Star Trek Universe. It's also set in 2380 , just one year after the events of Star Trek: Nemesis .

The fourth and final movie starring the cast of Star Trek: The Next Generation , Star Trek: Nemesis saw Captain Picard meet one of his deadliest enemies, his own clone named Shinzon (Tom Hardy). Picard's would-be doppelganger conquered the Romulan Empire, installed himself as Praetor, and implemented a complicated plot to destroy the United Federation of Planets with a Thalaron weapon. Thanks to the heroism of Commander Data (Brent Spiner), Picard was able to defeat Shinzon, but it required the android sacrificing his life to save the U.S.S. Enterprise-E . But part of Shinzon's scheme involved Data discovering his own doppelganger, an imperfect Soong-type android called B-4, on the planet Kolarus. Instead of beaming down from the Enterprise , Picard, Data, and Lt. Commander Worf (Michael Dorn) flew to Kolarus aboard a heavy-duty shuttlecraft and used a new, dune-buggy like vehicle called the Argo to collect B-4's scattered parts and escape hostile natives.

Related: Lower Decks' Second Contact Is An Important Addition To Star Trek Lore

Star Trek: Lower Decks revealed that the series' signature starship, the U.S.S. Cerritos , also has an Argo. In the premiere episode, "Second Contact", Ensign Beckett Mariner (Tawney Newsome) steals away from her Away team's mission and drives the Argo on a clandestine journey to deliver farming equipment to some Galardonian farmers, and she's followed by her fellow shipmate in the lower decks, Ensign Brad Boimler (Jack Quaid). Mariner's Argo is the exact same vehicle Picard drove on Kolarus the year prior, only with the Starfleet delta insignia in place of the "Argo" manufacturers' logo.

Star Trek Lower Decks Argo Buggy

The Argo's presence in Star Trek: Nemesis was an olive branch from the film's producers to Patrick Stewart. As the legendary actor himself admitted in Star Trek: Nemesis ' behind the scenes features on the DVD, the Argo was a "gift" to him from writer John Logan to entice the reluctant Stewart to return as Picard . In real life, Stewart is an enthusiast for driving and off-roading; Logan (likely fueled by inside info from his good friend Brent Spiner, who helped conceive the film's story) knew that Sir Patrick would be far more inclined to sign onto Star Trek: Nemesis if there was a scene where Picard got to drive a new, all-terrain vehicle and lead an exciting chase sequence.

However, many Trekkers take issue with Star Trek: Nemesis ' Argo action scenes by citing how out of character it is that the cerebral Jean-Luc Picard suddenly became so gung-ho about off-roading, but this is just one of a litany of complaints about Star Trek: Nemesis , which is generally seen as one of the worst Star Trek movies . The Argo also doesn't make sense as a Starfleet vehicle since the open-air buggy is considerably less practical than the shuttlecraft that was used to cargo it to the planet.

Regardless, the Argo is, apparently, now a common part of Starfleet and it has become a standard-issue vehicle if the Cerritos has them aboard. After all, the Cerritos isn't even considered one of Starfleet's important vessels, although perhaps the act of giving the Cerritos the rather silly Argo is a statement in of itself. Since "Second Contact" began with the Cerritos docked at Douglas Station for refit and resupply, it's possible that the Argo may have been loaded aboard while Mariner was getting drunk on Romulan whiskey and accidentally slashing Boimler's leg open with a Klingon bat'leth in the opening moments of Star Trek: Lower Decks ' hilarious series premiere.

Next: Star Trek: Lower Decks Brings Back Key Tech Skipped By Discovery And Picard

Star Trek: Lower Decks streams Thursdays on CBS All-Access.

Memory Alpha

Argo (shuttlecraft)

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The Argo was a Federation Argo -type shuttlecraft that was in service with Starfleet in the late 24th century , attached to the USS Enterprise -E .

The Argo was designed with recessed warp nacelles and fold-down wings . These wings were designed to assist in atmospheric maneuverability.

The shuttle was equipped with an all-terrain buggy that could transport up to three passengers over rugged terrain. The buggy was secured aboard the shuttle's cargo bay via wheel clamps. The shuttlecraft could also be remote controlled from a device on the buggy .

In 2379 , on its first mission , the Argo was commanded by Captain Picard . Accompanied by Worf and Data , Picard successfully located and recovered the Soong-type android B-4 from the planet Kolarus III . ( Star Trek Nemesis )

Appendices [ ]

Background information [ ].

The shuttlecraft Argo was designed by FX artist John Eaves . Eaves classified the Argo as a heavy transport shuttle. [1]

In an early draft of the script , this shuttle was called a "transport vehicle" and was described to be " larger than a regular shuttle with a particularly large cargo area at the back. "

The interior of the Argo was represented with a set on Paramount Stage 27 . ( Information from shooting schedule )

The Argo made an appearance in the Star Trek: Ships of the Line (2011) calendar, for the month of December. In this illustration, painted by John Eaves, the Argo was on a landing vector for the main shuttlebay of the Enterprise -E.

Star Trek Official Starships Collection Shuttle Issue 09

Shuttle issue #09

According to Shuttlecraft issue #09 of the Star Trek: The Official Starships Collection , the Argo (cargo shuttle 5) was a Type 17 heavy transport, or cargo, shuttle. Equipped with a 2.250 millicochrane engine, this type of ship had a cruising speed of warp 1.65.

External links [ ]

  • Argo shuttle at StarTrek.com
  • Argo (shuttlecraft) at Memory Beta , the wiki for licensed Star Trek works
  • 2 Thy'lek Shran
  • 3 The Survivors (episode)

Star Trek: Lower Decks Brings Back Picard’s Notorious Dune Buggy

Star Trek: Lower Decks premiered this week on CBS All Access and was far from the disaster many predicted. Despite the comedic tone, it had a seriousness at its core and, as promised, didn't make fun of the principles at the heart of the Star Trek. It also contained a lot of references to tickle the knowledgeable fans. There's obvious stuff like the Klingon bat'leth, but less-known stuff like the appearance of little-seen alien species the Benzites and the notorious 'skant.' However, there's one reference that will surely have seasoned Trek fans shuddering.

star-trek-lower-decks-crew (1)

Star Trek: Lower Decks premiered this week on CBS All Access and was far from the disaster many predicted . Despite the comedic tone, it had a seriousness at its core and, as promised, didn’t make fun of the principles at the heart of the Star Trek . It also contained a lot of references to tickle the knowledgeable fans. There’s obvious stuff like the Klingon bat’leth, but less-known stuff like the appearance of little-seen alien species the Benzites and the notorious ‘skant.’ However, there’s one reference that will surely have seasoned Trek  fans shuddering.

Yes, Jean-Luc Picard’s dune buggy is back! Officially known as the Argo, the vehicle was the star of a chase sequence in the notoriously terrible Star Trek: Nemesis .  In a ludicrous scene, Picard, Data and Worf land on a desert planet and explode out the back of a shuttle in a dune buggy , all three wearing futuristic Ray-Bans. Picard pulls some sick drifts around the desert and has a giant grin on his face as he floors it. What soon follows is a dune buggy chase where Worf is firing the buggy’s mounted gun that looks like Halo cosplay.

star trek nemesis dune buggy

Audiences were puzzled as to why the usually pretty stoic Picard is so into dune buggies. The answer came, though, when Nemesis’ difficult production was revealed. Patrick Stewart was unsure about returning to play Picard so, knowing that he’s a big fan of off-road vehicles, the screenwriters conceived a dune buggy scene to tempt him back. From Stewart’s perspective this was great – he got a fat paycheque and got to zip around in the desert on a space ATV. It was a win-win. It also explains why Picard is possibly happier than he’s ever looked when behind the wheel of the Argo.

Seeing it pop up in  Star Trek: Lower Decks at least proves that the show’s writers know some obscure and fun details. And now, I can’t wait to see what else they bring back.

10 Deleted Scenes That Explain Confusing Star Trek Moments

7. star trek nemesis - the crushers.

STAR TREK NERO

The Mystery:

What was Wesley Crusher doing at Riker and Troi's wedding and where did Beverly go?

The Deleted Scene:

Rightly hated by fans and non-fans alike, Star Trek Nemesis favors underwhelming action set pieces (a pointless dune buggy chase, a protracted space battle) over the characters its supposed to be bidding farewell to.

Still, tons of footage was shot to tie up the Enterprise crew's arcs only to be cut from the film. Much of this footage is simple but useful character development: Picard and Data musing over the passage of time; Riker, Troi, and Worf sharing a meal in Ten Forward; Worf expressing his long held suspicion of the Romulans. But other material actually explained what happened to these people and gave both Wesley and Beverly Crusher something of a send off.

Set immediately after Picard's toast at Riker and Troi's wedding, material deleted from the film actually gives Wil Wheaton's Wesley Crusher dialogue. In it, he reveals he's off to join Riker and Troi on the USS Titan and Picard comments on seeing Wesley back in Starfleet. The exchange doesn't actually explain why Wesley and the Traveler broke up, but it's at least an acknowledgment of the last time we saw the former acting ensign. And hey, Wil Wheaton gets a few lines after an eight year absence from the franchise rather than the glorified background role he has in the final cut.

Wesley's mother, Beverly, is treated just slightly better in Star Trek Nemesis but she still just up and disappears before the film's conclusion without explanation. That explanation was included in a deleted scene that showed Beverly had departed the Enterprise-E and was now head of Starfleet Medical. Might've been a nice conclusion for a character who often had nothing to do when she wasn't having sex with a candle ghost.

I played Shipyard Bar Patron (Uncredited) in Star Trek (2009).

Den of Geek

Star Trek: Picard Sequel Movie Update Should Worry Next Generation Fans

Patrick Stewart is excited about the idea of a new Star Trek: The Next Generation movie. But his excitement is cause for concern among Trekkies.

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Star Trek: Picard Season 3 Episode 9

This Star Trek: Picard article contains spoilers.

Do you remember how great it felt when Jean-Luc Picard stepped onto the bridge of the restored USS Enterprise -D, with all the members of his senior staff around him and ready for one last adventure? Remember how much better that was than watching Icheb from Voyager get mutilated or watching Picard ride dune buggies in Star Trek: Nemesis ? Patrick Stewart does not.

In a recent interview with the Happy Sad Confused podcast, Stewart talked about an upcoming Star Trek movie centered on at least part of the Star Trek: The Next Generation cast. “I heard only last night about a script that is being written, but written specifically with the actor, Patrick, to play in it,” Stewart told host Josh Horowitz. “And I’ve been told to expect to receive it within a week or so.”

That sounds exciting, right? After all, while some didn’t enjoy the nostalgia that the third season of Star Trek: Picard blasted at viewers like so many photon torpedoes, lots of Trekkies loved seeing the growth and changed dynamics of their favorite Next Generation characters. The series had plenty of callbacks, especially the aforementioned return of the Enterprise -D, but it also had scenes that showed how the characters have changed over the years, most notably Geordi’s relationship to Picard.

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Simply put, Picard season three left Next Generation in the best place it’s been since 1994. So why would a continuation be worrisome?

To be clear, the problem isn’t with picking up the plot threads from Picard ‘s final season. By the end of the series, now-Captain Seven of Nine has taken command of the newly-christened Enterprise -G, with Raffi at her side as XO and Jack Crusher, son of Picard and Beverly Crusher, in tow. Heck, even Q visits Jack to announce a new test. We would all be happy to watch that potential spinoff series, dubbed Star Trek: Legacy by Picard season 3 showrunner Terry Matalas .

But Stewart specifically talks about a Picard movie. Worse, it’s one that he likes. “I’m so excited because it sounds like the kind of project where the experimentation that I want to do will be essential for this kind of material,” he explained.

Fans’ sense of ownership over characters they love leads to creative stagnation and weird gatekeeping. That said, nobody seems to understand Jean-Luc Picard less than the man who made us love Jean-Luc Picard, Patrick Stewart.

Fans see Picard as a thoughtful and principled Captain, a man who considers all positions and powerfully articulates his position, a man who holds to his convictions, even under threat of torture. Stewart sees Picard as, well, Jim Kirk, at least the stereotypical action hero version of Kirk.

Stewart wants Picard kicking butt, kissing ladies, and showing off his physique. After all, it was Stewart’s power as executive producer on the TNG movies that led to scenes of Picard swinging on cables in First Contact or dropping quips and shooting baddies in Insurrection . And yes, it was Stewart’s idea to have Picard drive a dune buggy in Nemesis .

By the time Picard debuted in 2020, the late septuagenarian Stewart knew that his action days were behind him. However, he still had strong feelings about how his character’s show should go, refusing to repeat any beats he hit playing Picard on Next Generation . “In a way, the world of Next Generation had been too perfect and too protected,” Stewart told Variety shortly before the premier of Picard . he says. “It was a safe world of respect and communication and care and, sometimes, fun.”

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But with Picard , Stewart wanted to take the franchise in a different direction. He used the show to respond “to the world of Brexit and Trump and feeling, ‘Why hasn’t the Federation changed? Why hasn’t Starfleet changed?’ Maybe they’re not as reliable and trustworthy as we all thought.” And in the words of season 1’s de facto showrunner Michael Chabon, “We took all of that so seriously — like gospel, the word of God, really — and we obeyed.”

That lack of safety certainly played out in action moments, such as Seven of Nine’s vengeful attack on Icheb’s murderers or in Q’s malevolence in season 2. But it also played out in the general tone of the series, which saw the Federation turn into a group of fear-mongering yokels, easily duped by Romulan agents, and made the Borg into minions of a bumbling Queen.

Stewart eventually agreed to Matalas’s vision of a TNG reunion in the third season because the writer knew how to move the character forward without throwing out the past. Scenes such as Captain Shaw’ s recollection of Wolf 359 or Picard’s final standoff with Ro Laren demonstrate the way characters can look back at the past from a different, more mature perspective.

Maybe Stewart’s work on Picard ‘s third season has opened him up to the possibility of keeping the things that worked with Picard before the end of TNG , and finding ways to move the character organically from that position instead of turning the captain into something he’s not. But when Stewart talks about “experimentation,” Trekkies should worry. The only experimentation we like is from Riker’s jazz combo.

Joe George

Joe George | @jageorgeii

Joe George’s writing has appeared at Slate, Polygon, Tor.com, and elsewhere!

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Star Trek: Nemesis

Brent Spiner, Patrick Stewart, and Tom Hardy in Star Trek: Nemesis (2002)

The Enterprise is diverted to the Romulan homeworld Romulus, supposedly because they want to negotiate a peace treaty. Captain Picard and his crew discover a serious threat to the Federation... Read all The Enterprise is diverted to the Romulan homeworld Romulus, supposedly because they want to negotiate a peace treaty. Captain Picard and his crew discover a serious threat to the Federation once Praetor Shinzon plans to attack Earth. The Enterprise is diverted to the Romulan homeworld Romulus, supposedly because they want to negotiate a peace treaty. Captain Picard and his crew discover a serious threat to the Federation once Praetor Shinzon plans to attack Earth.

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Star Trek: Nemesis

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Jonathan Frakes

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Brent Spiner

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Michael Dorn

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Gates McFadden

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Tom Hardy

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Jude Ciccolella

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Star Trek: Insurrection

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  • Trivia Michael Dorn was reportedly very upset about Worf having nothing to do.
  • Goofs Data states that the inhabitants of Kolarus III are a "pre-warp" society, but yet the Enterprise has no problem with "contaminating" it with its presence in direct contravention of Starfleet's Prime Directive. Not only did the inhabitants see the Argo up close, as well as the Star Fleet personnel, but the Star Fleet crew fired at them, blew up one of their ATVs and possibly killed one or more of the locals. This is an unforgivable lapse on the part of the writers, producers, and director. As for the Enterprise detecting positronic signals, this does not mean that the inhabitants were the source of the technology. The violation of the Prime Directive was serious and flagrant.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard : Duty. A starship captain's life is filled with solemn duty. I have commanded men in battle. I have negotiated peace treaties between implacable enemies. I have represented the Federation in first contact with twenty-seven alien species. But none of this compares with my solemn duty today... as best man. Now, I know, on an occasion such as this, it is expected that I be gracious and fulsome in my praise on the wonders of this blessed union, but have the two of you considered what you were doing to me? Of course you're happy, but what about *my* needs? This is all a damned inconvenience. While you're happily settling in on the Titan, I will be training my new first officer. You all know him. He's a tyrannical martinet who will never, *ever*, allow me to go on away missions.

Data : That is the regulation, sir. Starfleet code section 12, paragraph 4...

Captain Jean-Luc Picard : Mr. Data...

Data : Sir?

Captain Jean-Luc Picard : Shut up.

Data : Yes, sir.

Captain Jean-Luc Picard : [turning to the wedding guests] 15 years I've been waiting to say that.

  • Crazy credits Both the letter 'R' in 'Trek' and the second 'E' in 'Nemesis' are presented backward within the words in order to introduce the idea of a mirror image.
  • Extended Wedding Sequence - Originally, Riker and Troi's wedding was much longer and featured Wesley Crusher (played by Wil Wheaton) in attendance. (He is still sitting next to Dr. Crusher in the theatrical version) Also during the wedding, Picard opens up to Lt. Commander Data and reveals his dismay over being a private loner all his life.
  • The Seduction of Counselor Troi - In the original three-hour version, Shinzon's obsession with Troi runs much deeper and there are several scenes that show him seducing and tormenting her in her mind. A scene featured in the theatrical trailers show Troi struggling with the mind meld inflicted by Shinzon and his Viceroy. You still see the effects of the torturous mind meld in the theatrical version as Troi appears fatigued and psychologically drained.
  • A scene of Data teaching his brother B-4 how to eat with a fork.
  • Ambassador Worf and Dr. Crusher were also featured more prominently in the three-hour version and it was revealed that Worf was on his way back to Kronos after leaving Deep Space Nine and he was featured in more action sequences that were deleted from the theatrical release. Dr. Crusher is revealed to be considering leaving the Enterprise after receiving an offer from Starfleet Medical.
  • Footage of Geordi and Data planning and executing the mission to rescue Picard on board the Scimitar was also deleted and featured the swapping places of Data and B-4.
  • Extended ending - Riker and Troi board the USS Titan as he takes command as Captain and she resumes her job as ship's counselor. The instatement of a new First Officer on the Enterprise is shown. Picard bids farewell to Dr. Crusher as she accepts the offer from Starfleet Medical and leaves for San Francisco.
  • Connections Featured in Siskel & Ebert: Gangs of New York/Maid in Manhattan/Antwone Fisher/Star Trek: Nemesis/The Hot Chick (2002)
  • Soundtracks Remus (uncredited) Composed, Conducted and Produced by Jerry Goldsmith Contains "Theme from 'Star Trek' TV Series" by Alexander Courage

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  • December 13, 2002 (United States)
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  • $60,000,000 (estimated)
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  • $18,513,305
  • Dec 15, 2002
  • $67,336,470

Technical specs

  • Runtime 1 hour 56 minutes
  • Dolby Digital
  • Dolby Surround 7.1

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Brent Spiner, Patrick Stewart, and Tom Hardy in Star Trek: Nemesis (2002)

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A Look Back at Star Trek: Nemesis , the Film That Killed a Franchise

On February 1, Star Trek: Nemesis leaves Netflix in America. This also happens to be the same year as that film’s 15th anniversary. So I decided to rewatch it to see if my memory of this film as a complete disaster was true.

Let this gif from the opening minutes stand as the answer to that question.

Rewatching Star Trek: Nemesis is interesting because all the things we know now mean that it’s even more compellingly bad than it was at the time. For one thing, knowing that it ended the on-screen adventures of the Next Generation crew means that you can’t ignore it the way that Star Trek V is ignored. And it has Tom Hardy as a villain. This movie being the first time I’d heard of Tom Hardy means that, from Inception to Mad Max: Fury Road , every time I see his face I have the stray, unkillable thought of “lol, remember when Tom Hardy played a young, crazy clone of Jean-Luc Picard?”

Nemesis also sets up a whole Federation/Romulan peace thing that is just hysterical once J.J. Abrams’ Star Trek showed us that, in the Prime Universe, the Romulans and the Remans exploded in a ball of fire. And finally, knowing that John Logan wrote this script makes you realize, “Okay, so after trying to do the whole secret, angry clone as an adversary in Nemesis , he basically tried the same thing again when he wrote the script for Spectre ?” Yeah, in both cases, Logan decided that the way to interject depth was by having a secret relationship reveal.

It did not work either time.

Also, holy shit does someone need to teach Logan how simplify a plot. Oh, I’m sorry. Do you want to know the plot? No? Too bad .

Years ago, the Romulans cloned Picard with the intention of aging up the clone, replacing Picard with their clone, and using him as a spy within Starfleet. And then the plan was scuttled, not because it was a pants-shittingly bad plan, but because a new Romulan administration showed up and just shut everything the old guard was doing. And then they sent the small human child to the dilithium mines on Remus. (Oh yeah, and also the Romulans have a sister planet with a sister race called the Remans. Because Rome.)

At some point, the Picard clone acquired the name Shinzon, became the leader of the Remans, turned the Romulan Senate to stone, takes over the planet, and implements his plan of luring the Enterprise to Romulan space so that Shinzon can drain him of his blood to cure a clone-related genetics problem. And then he’ll use his technobabble McGuffin to kill everyone on Earth.

Often when making a franchise film, part of the goal is to make something that complete neophytes can enjoy but is richer for fans. Nemesis is like that, but being a Star Trek fan means the badness is a richer, deeper “fuck you” than it is for the casual viewer. I mean, don’t get me wrong—it’s bad on the general level, too.

For example, the final fight between Shinzon and Picard isn’t epic. It’s slow. Slow enough that none of the action looks cool, it looks sad. There’s so much time between the beats that you can’t believe no one’s dodging anything. For instance, Shinzon should never have been hit by this pipe; it took Picard a small ice age to pull it down, Shinzon had plenty of time to get out of the way.

For fans, Nemesis is even worse. The idea of the Romulans having a sister race would be more interesting if Star Trek hadn’t been doing it for decades. The Romulans are already related to Vulcans. We didn’t need to add another race to this story, especially one as on the nose as the “Remans.”

Similarly, the addition of B-4, a Data prototype, did not help. A robot that looks like Data was another plot the show had done before and better. And the fact that no one in the movie brought up those previous Data dopplegangers was a glaring omission.

And this film was the second film to feature the Troi maneuver, i.e. crash the Enterprise with the counselor at the helm.

Finally, this is a movie that made me wonder where Wesley was. I don’t ever want to have that thought again.

Nemesis has aged abysmally. Its box office failure made it a franchise killer back in 2002, but its narrative failures make it a never-ending source of disappointment.

Star Trek: The 10 Best References in Star Trek: Lower Decks Season 1

Star Trek: Lower Decks is going for a much more lighthearted look at the universe and it's packed with smart references. Here's ten of the best.

There are few franchises with as rich a history as Star Trek . Since Captain Kirk, Mister Spock and the crew of the Enterprise first graced TV screens in 1966, there have been nine series and thirteen movies , giving the world hundreds of hours of sci-fi entertainment. Even now, Star Trek continues to live on with shows like Picard , Discovery , and Lower Decks .

RELATED:  Star Trek: 10 Greatest Battles, Ranked

While Picard and Discovery are both live-action shows that have a darker edge to them than Star Trek is known for, Lower Decks goes in the exact opposite direction. The animated series set shortly after the events of Star Trek: Nemesis , Lower Decks is a light-hearted comedy that, instead of focusing on the bridge crew like most Star Trek fare, sets its sights on the adventures of a group of ensigns on the USS Cerritos. Lower Decks is fun, exciting, and filled with references to Star Trek's fifty-four-year history.

10 The Argo Buggy

Star Trek Lower Decks

Making its debut in Star Trek: Nemesis , the Argo Buggy is, as the name suggests, a dune buggy. The four-wheeled all-terrain vehicle is used by Captain Picard, Data, and Worf to traverse Kolarus III. In the movie, Captain Picard clearly enjoys driving the Argo, smiling and laughing as he swerves out of the way of rocks and bushes. Star Trek: Lower Decks is set just a year after the events of Star Trek: Nemesis , and it seems that in that time the Argo has become standard issue for Starfleet ships as it shows up in a number of episodes.

9 Vendorian

Star Trek Lower Decks

While it often gets forgotten, there was an animated Star Trek series long before Lower Decks . Star Trek: The Animated Series ran for twenty-two episodes and featured the voices of most of the cast of the original series. In the sixth episode of the series, the crew of the Enterprise meets a Vendorian, a shapeshifting alien.

RELATED:  Star Trek: Every Version of The Enterprise, Ranked

In Lower Decks episode 2, “Envoys,” Mariner and Boimler have a run-in with a Vendorian who has disguised itself as an Andorian, making this the first appearance of a Vendorian since 1973. Shockingly, the Vendorian isn't even the craziest reference in the episode.

8 The Deleted Rock Monster

Star Trek V Star Trek Lower Decks Rock Man

When Mariner and Boimler chase the Vendorian into a bar on Tulgana IV, they run afoul of the patrons, including a couple of Rock Men. These Rock Men have never officially appeared in Star Trek before, but that's only because they were cut out of Star Trek V: The Final Frontier . In a deleted scene for the movie, Captain Kirk was attacked by a Rock Man while on Sha Ka Ree. According to Tom Morga, the stuntman who played the Rock Man, these aliens can breathe fire. Sadly, the scene was cut because everyone felt it didn't work.

7 T'Ana The Caitian Doctor

Star Trek Animated

Taking a page from Star Trek: The Original Series , Lower Decks has its own grumpy doctor. Doctor T'ana is a Caitian, a race of cat-like people who first appeared in Star Trek: The Animated Series . On that show, a Caitian named M'Ress had replaced Lieutenant Checkov as a member of the Enterprise bridge crew.

While it is never explained why Chekov is missing from the crew in the animated series, behind the scenes it was because of budget restrictions. The show couldn't afford to bring back everyone from the original series, and they chose to cut Walter Koenig, the actor who played Chekov in two seasons of the original series. Happily, Chekov would return for the movies.

6 The Most Important Person In Star Fleet History

Miles O'Brien Star Trek Lower Decks

At the end of the “Temporal Edict,” the third episode of Star Trek: Lower Decks , we learn that in the far future Chief Miles O’Brien, who appeared on Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine , is considered one of the greatest, if not the greatest, member of Starfleet in history, although some may disagree .

What it is that makes Chief Miles O’Brien the greatest member of Starfleet isn't clear, but based on the endlessly horrible things that happened to him during the seven years of Deep Space Nine , it's safe to assume that he is remembered for his strong mind and skills as an engineer.

5 Is Barb Lal?

Star Trek Lower Decks Lal

In the fifth episode of Star Trek: Lower Decks , “Cupid’s Errant Arrow,” Mariner is convinced that Boimler's girlfriend Barb must be a diabolical alien of some sort and begins to keep a chart of all the possible beings that Barb could be. Mariner's board of aliens is filled with Star Trek references, including a Suliban from Star Trek: Enterprise , the Cardassian spy Seska from Star Trek: Voyager , and most surprisingly, Data's android daughter Lal from the Star Trek: The Next Generation episode “The Offspring”. Making it all that much more fun of a reference, the picture of Lal is from before she chose her gender.

4 Space Slug

Star Trek Voyager Lower Decks

In “Much Ado About Boimler,” the seventh episode of Lower Decks , Boimler is trapped between phasing from a transporter accident and Division 14 is called to handle the situation. Division 14 is a medical branch of Starfleet that handles unsolvable diseases and science mysteries, which Boimler has become.

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In the episode, while Boimler is being shipped to Division 14's headquarters with other Starfleet personnel who have been altered in some way, he meets Anthony, a man who has turned into a slug that looks a whole lot like Captain Janeway when she was turned into a slug in the Star Trek: Voyager episode “Threshold.”

3 Q Knows Trelane

Star Trek Q and Trelane

In “Veritas,” the eighth episode of Lower Decks , the much-loved Q makes an appearance in a flashback. In the scene, Q, dressed in his judge's robes forces the bridge crew of the Cerritos to play a strange game that is part chess, part soccer, and park poker.

Q then shows up again at the end of the episode, appearing to the lower decks crew and yelling out "I challenge you to a duel!" That line is a reference to Trelane, the adversary of Kirk in the TOS episode “The Squire of Gothos.” While Trelane wasn't part of the Q-Continuum when he appeared on TOS - because there was no Q-Continuum at the time - he was later retconned into the Q-Continuum in the Star Trek novel Q-Squared .

Star Trek TOS Star Trek Lower Decks

In the season one finale, "No Small Parts," the crew of the Cerritos are on the planet Beta III, which made its first appearance in the Star Trek: The Original Series episode “The Return of the Archons.” In that episode, Kirk and the crew go to Beta III where they learn that the people follow the orders of a computer called Landru. Landru had convinced the people of Beta III that they should follow a system called “The Red Hour” in which, for one hour a day, everyone on Beta III would become frighteningly violent and destroy as much property or kill as many people as they could without repercussions.

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Kirk and the Enterprise crew were able to convince the people of Beta III that what Landru had thought them was wrong, and that not killing people for an hour every day was a better way to live. As we see on Lower Decks , the people of Beta III have forgotten what Kirk taught them and are back to worshipping Landru.

1 Animated Kirk And Spock

Star Trek Animated

A brief but brilliant reference that also appeared in "No Small Parts" is when Commander Jack Ransom is reading up on Beta III and Landru on his datapad, we see an image of Kirk and Spock, but instead of being drawn to match the art style of Lower Decks , the duo looks like the animated versions of themselves from Star Trek: The Animated Series .

Over the years, there has been a lot of debate on whether or not Star Trek: The Animated Series is part of the official Star Trek canon , but moments like this and the inclusion of the Vendorian in "Envoys" puts that argument to bed once and for all.

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star trek nemesis dune buggy

  • Release Dates
  • Home Theater 101
  • The Bonus View

star trek nemesis dune buggy

Star Trek: Nemesis - 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray

Like all good things, a long journey must come to an end and the Next Generation crew of the Starship Enterprise takes their final cinematic bow with the entertaining but decidedly uneven Star Trek: Nemesis . Now on 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray, Picard and his crew enjoy another beautiful Dolby Vision transfer with an aggressive audio mix to match and another selection of excellent bonus features. Not the best Trek but not the worst either - Recommended .

  • TECH SPECS & RELEASE DETAILS Technical Specs : 4K UHD Blu-ray/Blu-ray/Digital Copy Video Resolution/Codec : 2160p/HEVC / H.265 Dolby Vision/HDR10 Length :116 Release Country :United States Aspect Ratio(s) : 2.39:1 Movie Studio : Paramount Release Date : April 4th, 2023

Story Review Storyline: Our Reviewer's Take

star trek nemesis dune buggy

As Tolian Soran said a few missions back, “...time is going to hunt you down, and make the kill," and time is on the hunt for Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart) and the crew of the Federation Starship Enterprise-E. As their tenure with Starfleet is about to reach its sunset, they’re called upon to rendezvous with Shinzon (Tom Hardy), the new Romulan Praetor to enter peace negotiations with the Federation. Only Shinzon isn’t a Romulan… he’s human, the failed experimental clone of Jean-Luc Picard! Faced with a younger more violent version of himself, Picard must once again protect the Federation from a threat unlike anything the galaxy has ever seen before.

All good things must come to an end, and we can only hope they end gracefully and fitfully. No one likes to see their heroes depart, but we can hope they’re able to go out strong. I don’t think Star Trek: Nemesis was intended to be the final cinematic voyage of Picard and his crew, but it sadly ended up that way after a dismal box office performance. As what has been a common theme for this round of films, Nemesis was a victim of competing ideals for a franchise with an identity crisis. One of my production professors at the time put it succinctly, “It’s a movie trying to hold onto the television series while also trying to be Star Wars .” 

On one hand Nemesis is sticking to its roots with interesting thematic elements about age, youth, and legacy. On the other hand, it’s also all about dune buggy “pew-pew” blaster fights. There’s an attempt at duality with ideas of Picard coming face to face with a violent version of himself and if he could have been the same under different circumstances. The version that could have been. Meanwhile, Data discovers another prototype of himself with B4 and attempts to upgrade and enhance this simpler more innocent android. But then we have to have those big space battles to keep those butts in theater seats excited with the Scimitar attacking the Enterprise. It tries to be small and ponderous and big and loud at the same time but

star trek nemesis dune buggy

All bumps aside, at least it’s entertaining. The new creative team of director Stuart Baird and writer John Logan definitely help to elevate this film above Insurrection (although as evidenced by his audio commentary, Baird might not have been the best choice). There’s energy and drive to break out of the small screen mold. And to that point, this is a creative move that probably should have happened a lot earlier in this Crew’s cinematic run. It would have also been wise to emulate some of the playbook moves of the Original Crew’s films with a multi-part storyline. Nemesis certainly feels like it’s trying to set up future adventures while the previous three films were content to be simple one-off episodes rather than an arching story. 

star trek nemesis dune buggy

And when this film failed at the box office in 2002, that was it. It was all over. We got the fleeting final image of B4 singing a song Data had stored in his memory banks and Paramount moved on to reboot the franchise with the uneven Kelvin timeline (that still may or may not have a fourth film coming). It took 18 years for the powers that be to decide it was time to come back to Picard and his crew and give them a genuinely satisfying final mission. While the first two seasons of Picard were decent, this third season is giving fans of Jean-Luc, Riker, Troi, Worf, Data, Geordi, and Crusher the finale we could have only hoped for so long ago. If there's room at the end of this last season for another Next Generation theatrical adventure, I wouldn't be upset.

Vital Disc Stats: The 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray The fourth and final cinematic adventure of the Next Generation crew, Star Trek: Nemesis , beams down to 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray with a two-disc 4K UHD + Blu-ray + Digital set from Paramount. Housed in a standard sturdy case, the 4K is pressed on a BD-66 with a BD-50 saved for the remastered 1080p presentation and bonus features. Both discs load to static-image main menus.

Video Review

star trek nemesis dune buggy

After the bright and cheery-looking Insurrection , Nemesis went dark… literally. This is a very dark-looking film as a key character is adverse to bright lights, so it's often steeped in pitch black with dynamic ominous shadows - and it looks great in 4K with Dolby Vision HDR. I heard it joked this lighting scheme was done so Paramount didn’t have to pay to paint the sets. True or not, when the lights are on, the film looks terrific with impressive details in facial features, costumes, and the slick makeup and creature effects for the Remans. CGI work is also a little stronger here than past films. Some of the CGI ship models can look a little weightless, but a lof of the effects hold up beautifully. Fine film grain is present throughout and there isn’t any signs of troublesome modulation or smoothing. 

Dolby Vision (and HDR10) work well for this outing, especially because of the film’s deep black levels and frequent shadowed imagery. The blacks are deep, ominous, and inky but offer some excellent shadow separation and depth. Even in the darkest scenes, it feels like there’s more to the background than past releases. Colors are bold with beautiful primaries with healthy natural skin shades. Whites are crisp and clear without issue. Once again this is another excellent Trek transfer for 4K leaving the film looking better than ever on disc.

Audio Review

star trek nemesis dune buggy

Star Trek: Nemesis also enjoys a full-throated active and engaging Dolby TrueHD 7.1 track. As silly as that dune buggy blaster battle race was, it sounds fantastic! Much like First Contact , a little more action goes a long way with this mix. The soundscape feels wide and expansive for those big open sequences in the desert or in Shinzon’s main hall but then can tighten up and feel claustrophobic for the battle on the Scimitar. Blaster fire and explosions and the hum of warp engines add some fun rumble into the subs. Dialog is clean and clear throughout without issue - Tom Hardy doesn’t do a goofy voice in this film. As the final completed score from Jerry Goldsmith before he passed away, it’s a great piece of work and sounds teriffic in this mix. There are quiet conversational moments that keep things relatively front/center focused, but there’s enough small activity in the sides and music in the rears to keep your channels engaged throughout. (The remastered Blu-ray enjoys this same excellent new 7.1 track as well).

Special Features

star trek nemesis dune buggy

The Paramount didn’t seem to mind that Star Trek: Nemesis was a flop at the box office, this release is stuffed to the gills with bonus content including three interesting audio commentaries. The Baird track is noteworthy for how much he just didn’t want this Star Trek film to be a Star Trek film, the other tracks are interesting but as has always been the case, the Michael and Denise Okuda tracks have always been the best and their text and audio commentaries continue that trend. The rest of the archival production and behind-the-scenes features are well worth the journey.  

4K UHD Disc

  • Audio Commentary by Stuart Baird
  • Audio Commentary by Rick Berman
  • Audio Commentary by Michael and Denise Okuda
  • Text Commentary by Michael and Denise Okuda

Blu-ray Disc

  • Library Computer Viewing Mode 
  • Nemesis Revisited
  • New Frontiers: Stuart Baird on Directing Nemesis 
  • Storyboarding the Action 
  • Red Alert! Shooting the Action of Nemesis 
  • Build and Rebuild 
  • Four-Wheeling in the Final Frontier 
  • Screen Test: Shinzon
  • The Star Trek Universe
  • A Star Trek Family’s Final Journey 
  • A Bold Vision of The Final Frontier 
  • The Enterprise-E 
  • Reunion with the Rikers 
  • Today’s Tech Tomorrow’s Data 
  • Robot Hall of Fame 
  • Brent Spiner: Data and Beyond – Part Four 
  • Trek Roundtable: Nemesis 
  • Starfleet Academy SCISEC Brief 010: Thalaron Radiation 
  • The Romulan Empire
  • Romulan Lore 
  • Shinzon & the Viceroy 
  • Romulan Design 
  • The Romulan Senate 
  • The Scimitar 
  • Deleted Scenes
  • Rick Berman Intro 
  • Wesley’s New Mission 
  • Chateau Picard, 2267 
  • The Time of Conquest 
  • Data and B-4 
  • Federation Protocols 
  • The Chance for Peace 
  • A Loss of Self 
  • Remember Him? 
  • Turbolift Violation 
  • Sickbay Prepares for Battle 
  • Cleaning out Data’s Quarters 
  • Crusher at Starfleet Medical 
  • Advice for the New First Officer 
  • Storyboards: Scorpion Escape
  • Storyboards: The Jefferies Tube
  • Storyboards: Collision 
  • Storyboards: Data’s Jump 
  • Galleries: Production 
  • Galleries: Props
  • Bryan Singer (Easter Egg)
  • Riker and the Beast (Easter Egg)
  • Terry Frazee  (Easter Egg)

Final Thoughts

star trek nemesis dune buggy

Star Trek: Nemesis was the end of an era. The tenth cinematic adventure should have been a fresh restart for the Next Generation crew looking to close out their tenure on the Enterprise. Instead, a film with a lot of potential misses as often as it hits. The action is more aggressive and intense and the villain is great, but the film ultimately mismanages its best assets for an entertaining but ultimately middling final cinematic voyage. Not the worst Trek film, but still far from the best. Even this middling adventure enjoys a pretty damned terrific 4K Ultra HD Blu-ray release. The new Dolby Vision transfer is a notable improvement over past discs with an exciting Dolby TrueHD 7.1 track to match. Toss in hours of informative bonus features and this is a more than worthwhile upgrade. Recommended

star trek nemesis dune buggy

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star trek nemesis dune buggy

IMAGES

  1. IMCDb.org: Made for Movie Dune Buggy Argo in "Star Trek: Nemesis, 2002"

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  2. IMCDb.org: Made for Movie Dune Buggy Argo in "Star Trek: Nemesis, 2002"

    star trek nemesis dune buggy

  3. Carsthatnevermadeitetc

    star trek nemesis dune buggy

  4. IMCDb.org: Made for Movie Dune Buggy Argo in "Star Trek: Nemesis, 2002"

    star trek nemesis dune buggy

  5. IMCDb.org: Made for Movie Dune Buggy Argo in "Star Trek: Nemesis, 2002"

    star trek nemesis dune buggy

  6. Star Trek Nemesis

    star trek nemesis dune buggy

VIDEO

  1. Buggy Dune

  2. Picard knows Bajorans #startrek #clips #ds9 #deepspacenine #deepspace9 #space #sciencefiction

  3. 10 Reasons To Stop Hating Star Trek: Nemesis

  4. Streaming Star Trek Resurgence! Choose your own adventure Trek! Buggy PC port alert! After: Sony's S

  5. STAR TREK NEMESIS THEATRICAL TRAILER

  6. Star Trek Next Generation Deck Builder Borg Invasion II Episode 5

COMMENTS

  1. Star Trek Nemesis

    Star Trek Nemesis | Dune Buggy Chase on Kolarus III | "Odds and Ends" by Jerry Goldsmith Streamers and Punches - Film Music Appreciation 77 subscribers Subscribe 1.8K views 3 years ago This scene...

  2. Argo (ground vehicle)

    24:28 Watch 24:28 Star Trek Timeline [INTERACTIVE] Argo Class: Argo type Owner: United Federation of Planets Operator: Starfleet Status: Active ( 2379) The Argo was a Starfleet ground vehicle attached to the Federation shuttlecraft Argo, carried aboard the USS Enterprise -E .

  3. Let's Talk About Picard's Dune Buggy, One Of The Dumbest Things ...

    Story by Witney Seibold S tuart Baird's "Star Trek: Nemesis" was, it seemed, the end of the road for "Star Trek: The Next Generation." The crew of the Enterprise-D left the airwaves in...

  4. Argo type ground vehicle

    The Argo-type ground vehicle was a type of all-terrain vehicle utilized by Starfleet for away missions during the late 24th century. Contents 1 History 2 Technical data 2.1 Stowage 2.2 Exterior features 2.3 Interior features 3 List of vehicles 4 Appendices 4.1 Appearances 4.2 Background information

  5. [Nemesis Reactions] SLASH FILM: Let's Talk About Picard's Dune Buggy

    The Argo is an officially manufactured piece of Starfleet equipment. Starfleet, it seems, expected its officers to get into dune buggy chases often enough that a specialty vehicle was required. Eventually, Picard has to drive the Argo off of a cliff into the open bay doors of the shuttlecraft, piloted by remote to hover in front of them.

  6. Argo scene ST Nemesis

    Argo scene Star Trek Nemesisi would like to see a argo buggy race+shooting ground pvp game in sto

  7. Star Trek: Lower Decks Brings Back Picard's Nemesis Vehicle

    Published Aug 6, 2020 Star Trek: Lower Decks has plenty of TNG-era tech, including the Argo, the infamous off-road vehicle Captain Picard drove in Star Trek: Nemesis. Warning: SPOILERS for Star Trek: Lower Decks Season 1, Episode 1 - "Second Contact"

  8. Argo (shuttlecraft)

    24:28 Watch 24:28 Star Trek Timeline [INTERACTIVE] Argo Class: Argo type Owner: United Federation of Planets Operator: Starfleet Status: Active ( 2379) The Argo was a Federation Argo -type shuttlecraft that was in service with Starfleet in the late 24th century, attached to the USS Enterprise -E .

  9. Star Trek: Lower Decks Brings Back Picard's Notorious Dune Buggy

    Officially known as the Argo, the vehicle was the star of a chase sequence in the notoriously terrible Star Trek: Nemesis . In a ludicrous scene, Picard, Data and Worf land on a desert...

  10. Star Trek: Nemesis (4K UHD Review)

    Nemesis also features some rather odd plot diversions, including a futuristic dune buggy chase to find the positronic parts of B-4 ... Star Trek: Nemesis was shot by cinematographer Jeffrey L. Kimball (Top Gun, True Romance) on 35 mm photochemical film using Panavision Panaflex Platinum and Millennium cameras, with Panavision Primo, C- and E ...

  11. 10 Deleted Scenes That Explain Confusing Star Trek Moments

    Rightly hated by fans and non-fans alike, Star Trek Nemesis favors underwhelming action set pieces (a pointless dune buggy chase, a protracted space battle) over the characters its...

  12. Mr. Plinkett's Star Trek: Nemesis Review

    Chapters:00:00 Introduction01:54 1. Star Trek 10: The Wrath of Shinzon06:24 2. Wedding Bells09:56 3. I don't know what's happening in the movie11:42 4. B-4 Y...

  13. Star Trek: Picard Sequel Movie Update Should Worry Next Generation Fans

    And yes, it was Stewart's idea to have Picard drive a dune buggy in Nemesis. Ad By the time Picard debuted in 2020, the late septuagenarian Stewart knew that his action days were behind him.

  14. I've just watched Star Trek: Nemesis and... WOW!!! : r/startrek

    Thank you, Data, George, Riker, Deanna, Picard, Beverly, Worf, Pulaski, Q, Lwaxanna, K'Ehleyr, Alyssa, Hawk, Daniels, Barkley and so many more... Since that first view of Picard from the window of the Enterprise, on their way to the Farpoint station, to now, the Spacedock above the earth... Wow!!! No words... Live long and prosper to you all.

  15. Star Trek: Nemesis (2002)

    Star Trek: Nemesis: Directed by Stuart Baird. With Patrick Stewart, Jonathan Frakes, Brent Spiner, LeVar Burton. The Enterprise is diverted to the Romulan homeworld Romulus, supposedly because they want to negotiate a peace treaty. Captain Picard and his crew discover a serious threat to the Federation once Praetor Shinzon plans to attack Earth.

  16. Star Trek: Nemesis

    Star Trek: Nemesis is a 2002 American science fiction film directed by Stuart Baird.It is the tenth film in the Star Trek franchise, as well as the fourth and final film to star the cast of Star Trek: The Next Generation.It was written by John Logan from a story developed by Logan, Brent Spiner, and producer Rick Berman.In the film, which is set in the 24th century, the crew of the USS ...

  17. A Look Back at Star Trek: Nemesis, the Film That Killed a Franchise

    Nemesis has aged abysmally. Its box office failure made it a franchise killer back in 2002, but its narrative failures make it a never-ending source of disappointment. On February 1, Star Trek ...

  18. Star Trek: The 10 Best References in Star Trek: Lower Decks Season 1

    Making its debut in Star Trek: Nemesis, the Argo Buggy is, as the name suggests, a dune buggy.The four-wheeled all-terrain vehicle is used by Captain Picard, Data, and Worf to traverse Kolarus III. In the movie, Captain Picard clearly enjoys driving the Argo, smiling and laughing as he swerves out of the way of rocks and bushes.

  19. First time in a long time watching Star Trek: Nemesis ... It ...

    The climax, instead of being a massive high-stakes battle like "Generations," "Insurrection," and "Nemesis," was the flight of the Phoenix and the birth of the future. Sure, torpedoes were fired, but they flew off into space. There wasn't even any real fighting in engineering. Data burst the tanks, the queen grabbed Picard, Data grabbed the queen.

  20. Star Trek: Nemesis 4K Blu-ray Review

    4K disc review of Star Trek: Nemesis, part of the Star Trek: The Next Generation 4-Movie Collection 4K box set from Paramount. The No. 1 Home Entertainment Tech Resource ... but because of some techno-babble is unable to use the transporters so a dune buggy is deployed to investigate. After a fierce gun battle and total disregard of the Prime ...

  21. [Serious] Why does everybody hate Star Trek Nemesis? : r/startrek

    Because it doesn't make any sense. tadayou. • 9 yr. ago • Edited 9 yr. ago. "Nemesis" felt very odd, because the director over-accentuated the action sequences, which didn't feel very Star Trek-like at times. It was supposed to be TNG's final adventure but not much of the final product came off as very TNG-esque.

  22. Star Trek: Nemesis

    Star Trek: Nemesis also enjoys a full-throated active and engaging Dolby TrueHD 7.1 track. As silly as that dune buggy blaster battle race was, it sounds fantastic! Much like First Contact, a little more action goes a long way with this mix.The soundscape feels wide and expansive for those big open sequences in the desert or in Shinzon's main hall but then can tighten up and feel ...

  23. Why would they have a dune buggy on a starship? : r ...

    Why would they have a dune buggy on a starship? : r/DaystromInstitute 40 votes, 78 comments. This is a real question designed to generate thoughtful speculation. If you can provide a speculation, or canonical reason why… Premium Explore Gaming