star trek deep space nine books

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Books In Order

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The Star Trek: Deep Space Nine series is a series of novels based on the science fiction genre and written by a number of noteworthy authors. The series consists of a total of more than 60 novels published between the years 1993 and 2008. The novels of the Deep Space Nine series are directly based on the television series of the same name which aired between the years 1993 and 1999. This series is the first one in the Star Trek franchise which has not included the franchise creator named Gene Roddenberry. The novels of the series are based on the time frame of the years following the 2370s and are set on a space station which is led by the Commander Benjamin Sisko. The Deep Space Nine novel series began in the year 1993, when author J.M Dillard published its first novel titled ‘Emissary’. A number of authors have given their contribution to the series and have written novels continuing with the plot of the series based on the television show. The Star Trek series is currently going on as the authors are busy writing the latest novels of the series. The readers all over the world enjoy reading the Deep Space Nine novels because they depict intricate mythology, and feature their own legitimate language, which is known as Klingon. The novels of the series have helped to enrich the mythos of the Star Trek franchise by accompanying the television series and the various Star Trek movies.

The first novel of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine series was published under the title ‘Emissary’ in the year 1993. It was written by the author J. M. Dillard. The plot of the novel shows a new crew that takes over the space station at a distant space and is about to change the galaxy with its astonishing discoveries. The space station named Deep Space Nine is situated in the orbit of Bajor and is controlled by the station commander named Benjamin Sisko. The station was used by the Cardassian Union on previous occasions. Sisko loses his wife Jennifer in the Borg attack and hence becomes resentful of his duties. The attack also destroys his former ship named the USS Saratoga. He seems to be worried about the wellness of his son Jake on the Deep Space Nine station. When Sisko and his son arrive at the station, they find it almost bare on the unimportant system of the Cardassians. The Bajoran staff on the station is led by Major Kira Nerys. Kira does not trust the presence of the Starfleet staff on the station. Soon, the USS Enterprise sends more Starfleet staff on the station, including Chief Miles O’Brien. As Miles O’Brien and his family arrive at the station, Sisko becomes more despondent as he does not like to take orders from Captain Picard, the man whom he holds responsible for his wife’s death. He informs the station crew that he is going to resign from his post and take up a civilian position, but continues to work as the station commander. Sisko takes the help of the chief of security of the station Odo, who is a shape-shifter, and manages to convince the Ferengi barkeeper named Quark to remain on board the station in order to help him in keeping the station active. He also intends to provide Jake a friend in the form of Quark’s nephew named Nog.

Sisko visits Kai Opaka, a spiritual leader of Bajor. Kai Opaka shows the Orb of Prophecy to Sisko, which is believed to be sent by the Prophets of Bajor. Sisko decides to look into the Orb and relive his special moments with wife Jennifer at the time of meeting her for the first time. After reliving the moments, Sisko is informed by Kai that Jennifer has the faith in him to be the ‘Emissary’, a messiah who can help Bajor. Kai hands him the Orb so that he can study his role further. After returning to the station, Sisko learns about the arrival of his remaining staff including Dr. Julian Bashir and Lt. Jadza Dax. He gives the Orb to Jadza Dax and asks her to study the scientific explanation of its working. Soon, the former commander of the station, Gul Dukat visits the station. He was the last prefect of Bajor from the Cardassian Union and informs Sisko about his ship parked in an orbit near the station. He asks for the permission to allow his crew to visit the promenade of the station, to which Sisko does not hesitate. He learns from Dax that the Orb is related a few phenomena in the Denorios Belt situated near Bajor. He wants to investigate the phenomena, but knows that any activity by him will make the Cardassian aware of his mission. Sisko asks Odo to disable the Cardassian sensors with the help of his shapeshifting abilities. Sisko prepares himself to go to Denorios Belt along with Dax to investigate the phenomena and does not worry about getting detected by the Cardassian sensors.

The second novel of the Deep Space Nine series was published in the year 1993 under the title ‘The Siege’. The plot of the novel deals with the efforts of Benjamin Sisko and Li Nalas to stop the Bajorans from commanding the Deep Space Nine station and Dax and Kira trying to end the Circle. In the opening sequence of the novel, Sisko decides to evacuate the civilian population of the station as the assault vessels of the Bajor arrive near Deep Space Nine station. The crew of the station decides to stay behind and fight against the Bajorans along with their commander Benjamin Sisko. The resulting battle endangers the friendship of Jake Sisko and Nog, who have just become new friends. But the two decide to stay as friends forever. Chief Miles is urged by her wife to leave the station and Quark tries to use the opportunity to broker additional seats. However, he is left on the station when his brother Rom sells his seat to a Dabo girl. There should be no sign of the presence of the Federation crew once the forces of Bajor arrive, but General Krim doubts this. He finds out that the security net of the station is disabled and hence, he believes that the Federation crew is still on board. Krim is ordered by Jaro to capture Li Nalas alive. Odo tries to use his shapeshifting abilities to prevent the crew from getting detected. Finally, the battle comes to an end and Sisko is once again made the commander of the station. As Li Nalas gets killed by coming in the way of a weapon blast, everyone becomes confused by knowing the true nature of Li Nalas. Sisko says that he will always remember Li Nalas as the hero of the resistance.

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Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Emissary - Book #1 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Bloodletter

The Big Game - Book #4 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

The Big Game

Fallen Heroes - Book #5 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Fallen Heroes

Betrayal - Book #6 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Proud Helios

Valhalla (Star Trek Deep Space Nine, No 10) - Book #10 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Valhalla (Star Trek Deep Space Nine, No 10)

Devil in the Sky - Book #11 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Devil in the Sky

The Laertian Gamble - Book #12 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

The Laertian Gamble

Station Rage (Star Trek Deep Space Nine, No 13) - Book #13 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Station Rage (Star Trek Deep Space Nine, No 13)

The Long Night - Book #14 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

The Long Night

Objective: Bajor - Book #15 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Objective: Bajor

Time's Enemy - Book #16 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Time's Enemy

The Heart of the Warrior (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, No 17) - Book #17 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

The Heart of the Warrior (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, No 17)

Saratoga (Star Trek Deep Space Nine, No 18) - Book #18 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Saratoga (Star Trek Deep Space Nine, No 18)

The Tempest - Book #19 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

The Tempest

Wrath of the Prophets - Book #20 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Wrath of the Prophets

Trial by Error (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine) - Book #21 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Trial by Error (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine)

Vengeance - Book #22 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

The 34th Rule (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine)

The Conquered - Book #24 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

The Conquered

The Courageous: Rebels Trilogy, Book 2 (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, No. 25) - Book #25 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

The Courageous: Rebels Trilogy, Book 2 (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, No. 25)

The Liberated: Rebels Trilogy, Book 3 (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, No. 26) - Book #26 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

The Liberated: Rebels Trilogy, Book 3 (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, No. 26)

A Stitch in Time (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine #27) - Book #27 of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

A Stitch in Time (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine #27)

The Ferengi Rules of Acquisition (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine) - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

The Ferengi Rules of Acquisition (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine)

Section 31: Abyss - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Section 31: Abyss

Star Trek-Deep Space Nine: Unity - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Star Trek-Deep Space Nine: Unity

The Lives of Dax - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

The Lives of Dax

Cathedral - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Lesser Evil (Star Trek Deep Space Nine: Mission Gamma, Book 4)

Cardassia and Andor (Worlds of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Vol. 1) - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Cardassia and Andor (Worlds of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Vol. 1)

Trill and Bajor (Worlds of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Vol. 2) - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Trill and Bajor (Worlds of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Vol. 2)

The Never Ending Sacrifice - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

The Never Ending Sacrifice

Demons of Air and Darkness - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Demons of Air and Darkness

Rising Son - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine - Warpath

Twilight (Star Trek Deep Space Nine: Mission Gamma, Book 1) - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Twilight (Star Trek Deep Space Nine: Mission Gamma, Book 1)

Enigma Tales - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Enigma Tales

Control - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Worlds of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Vol. 3

This Gray Spirit (Star Trek Deep Space Nine: Mission Gamma, Book 2) - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

This Gray Spirit (Star Trek Deep Space Nine: Mission Gamma, Book 2)

Prophecy and Change (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine) - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Prophecy and Change (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine)

Sacraments of Fire - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Sacraments of Fire

The Soul Key - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

The Soul Key

Hollow Men - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Trials and Tribble-Ations

Far Beyond the Stars - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Far Beyond the Stars

Original Sin - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Original Sin

Legends of the Ferengi (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine) - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Legends of the Ferengi (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine)

What You Leave Behind - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

What You Leave Behind

Millennium Omnibus (Star Trek Deep Space Nine) - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Millennium Omnibus (Star Trek Deep Space Nine)

Twist of Faith (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine) - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Twist of Faith (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine)

Force and Motion - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Force and Motion

The Way of the Warrior - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

The Way of the Warrior

The Search - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

The Long Mirage

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: These Haunted Seas (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine) - Book  of the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: These Haunted Seas (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine)

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star trek deep space nine books

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine — Multiple Authors

Emissary

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The Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Series in Order (87 Books)

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Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine was the fourth Star Trek series and entered production in 1992 . It was broadcast in first-run syndication from January 1993 until June 1999 .

It was the first Star Trek series created by Rick Berman and Michael Piller rather than by Gene Roddenberry . It was also the only series to air alongside another Star Trek production throughout its entire run, airing alongside Star Trek: The Next Generation from 1993 until 1994 , and then with Star Trek: Voyager from 1995 until 1999 .

  • Main Title Theme (seasons 1-3)  file info
  • (Themes composed by Dennis McCarthy ).
  • 1.1 The characters
  • 1.2 Alien races
  • 1.3 The mirror universe
  • 1.4 Technology
  • 1.5 Costumes
  • 2.1 Development
  • 2.2 Serialization
  • 3.1 Starring
  • 3.2 Also starring
  • 3.3 Special guest stars
  • 3.4 Special appearances by
  • 3.5 Recurring characters
  • 4 Executive producers
  • 5 Staff writers
  • 6.1 Season 1
  • 6.2 Season 2
  • 6.3 Season 3
  • 6.4 Season 4
  • 6.5 Season 5
  • 6.6 Season 6
  • 6.7 Season 7
  • 7 Related topics
  • 9 External links

Summary [ ]

Deep Space Nine goes where no Star Trek series had gone before – DS9 was the first Star Trek production not based on a starship , but instead, a starbase , known as Deep Space 9 (the starship USS Defiant was introduced in season 3, but the station remained the primary setting of the series). The show is known for its complex characters and storylines, engaging battle scenes and darker (less Utopian) atmosphere. Unlike its predecessors Star Trek: The Original Series and Star Trek: The Next Generation , Deep Space Nine tended to avoid an episodic format for most of its run and instead featured multiple-episode story arcs .

The show broke the "standard format" for Star Trek shows a number of times as well, with a direct, first-person narrative providing the commentary for the episode " In the Pale Moonlight ", a retelling of a classic TOS episode from a different angle in " Trials and Tribble-ations ", life in the racially segregated 1950s in " Far Beyond the Stars ", and a reintroduction of the concept of "black ops" to the Star Trek universe with Section 31 : " Inquisition ". The show also broke with tradition – and with the two Star Trek series that followed it – by featuring a commanding officer as the star of the show at the rank of commander, rather than captain, for a significant portion of its run, until Sisko was eventually promoted to captain in " The Adversary ". Additionally, a number of the episodes and main storylines focused entirely on characters who weren't members of Starfleet: for example, those revolving around Kira, Odo, Jake Sisko, and Quark. (" Progress ", " Shakaar ", " The House of Quark ", " Heart of Stone ", " Prophet Motive ", " Little Green Men ", " Bar Association ", " Body Parts ", " Nor the Battle to the Strong ", " The Ascent ", " The Darkness and the Light ", " Business as Usual ", " Ties of Blood and Water ", " Ferengi Love Songs ")

The characters [ ]

Unlike other Star Trek series, DS9 also had a large cast of recurring characters . Such characters included Nog , Rom , Elim Garak , Dukat , Vedek Bareil Antos , Winn Adami , Weyoun , the Female Changeling , Damar , Martok , Kasidy Yates , Leeta , Brunt , Ishka , and Zek .

Miles O'Brien , and later Worf , were two characters imported from TNG. Worf – a major character from TNG – played a large role on DS9. Several Next Generation characters also had recurring roles on the show, such as Keiko O'Brien and Gowron . Several other TNG characters made appearances too, such as Captain Jean-Luc Picard , Thomas Riker , Q , Lwaxana Troi , Kurn , Lursa , B'Etor , Admiral Alynna Nechayev , Vash , Toral and Alexander Rozhenko . In addition, Julian Bashir and Quark also had one-time appearances on The Next Generation , in " Birthright, Part I " and " Firstborn " respectively. Quark (and the station itself) also made a cameo in the pilot of Star Trek: Voyager , " Caretaker ". Characters from The Original Series were also re-introduced in DS9, including Kor , Kang , Koloth , and Arne Darvin .

The series also featured a number of episodes in which the character of Miles O'Brien was subjected to particular trauma. This became an in-joke among the DS9 writing staff, who called them "O'Brien Must Suffer" episodes and went to great lengths to produce at least one such episode per season. ( Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion , p. ? )

Alien races [ ]

The series focused on several races that were first featured on TNG, such as the Bajorans , the Cardassians , the Trill , and the Ferengi . Later, the Klingons and the Romulans (both created in TOS) became pivotal species in the series. Many other species made appearances on the series, including Vulcans , Bolians , and Benzites . The series also created many species of its own, most notably the Changelings , the Vorta , and the Jem'Hadar , who formed part of the Dominion .

Jadzia Dax and other Trills portrayed in DS9 were distinctly different from how Trills had been depicted in the TNG episode " The Host ". In DS9, the relationship between host and symbiont was described more as a truly symbiotic relationship rather than the symbiont dominating the host. Trills now having spots, rather than prosthetic make-up, was due to studio executives feeling that Jadzia Dax actress Terry Farrell was too attractive to cover her face up. ( Cinefantastique , Vol. 23, No. 6, p. 21)

Another significant change was the relationship Ferengi had with Humans . The Ferengi on TNG had originally been intended to be a new adversary comparable to the Klingons in TOS, although the writers had quickly realized how ridiculous the Ferengi were as villains. In DS9, the Ferengi were mainly entrepreneurs and the Ferengi Alliance was a politically neutral economic power.

Deep Space Nine also featured several regular characters who were not members of Starfleet , with Kira Nerys , a member of the Bajoran Militia , and Odo , the station's chief of security , as well as civilians such as Quark and Jake Sisko .

The mirror universe [ ]

The series spent some time exploring the mirror universe , which had not been seen since the TOS episode " Mirror, Mirror ". The mirror universe was featured in five episodes of the series: " Crossover ", " Through the Looking Glass ", " Shattered Mirror ", " Resurrection ", and " The Emperor's New Cloak ".

Technology [ ]

The show also focused on a wider array of uses and depictions of functions for holographic simulations (known as a holodeck in TOS and TNG but as a holosuite in DS9). In addition to many obvious activities (such as those referenced by Chief O'Brien and Julian Bashir) which were completely in keeping with holodeck usage on The Next Generation , the numerous applications of the holosuites on DS9 included them being used as: a recurring background for people to hang out in, in the form of a 1960s Las Vegas lounge (in numerous episodes); a weapons showroom (by Quark); and the location for a baseball game between teams assembled by Sisko versus Solok , a long-time rival Vulcan captain (in " Take Me Out to the Holosuite ").

Costumes [ ]

DS9 initially featured a noticeable change in Starfleet uniform to a reversed color scheme of the TNG uniform, which is a black design with the division color on the shoulders and a grayish-indigo undershirt underneath the uniform, resembling the cadet uniforms seen on The Next Generation . This design is called the old DS9-style uniforms . It was mostly implemented as a continuation of Star Trek 's pattern of changing uniforms over time, although factors such as the discomfort of wearing TNG-style uniforms played a role as well.

What came to be known as the DS9-style uniforms were more of a variant than a switch, however, due to the cost of producing all-new uniforms. This is why, for example, the DS9 crew themselves wear old DS9-style uniforms from the beginning of DS9 pilot episode " Emissary " up to the fifth season episode " The Ascent ", and this style was also later used throughout Star Trek: Voyager . Meanwhile, even after TNG had gone off the air, the dress uniforms and flag officer uniforms on DS9 up until the sixth season (as well as uniforms on Earth , as seen in the fourth season episodes " Homefront " and " Paradise Lost ") were " TNG-style ".

These discrepancies were corrected with the later switch to a unified, "gray-on-black" format with the division color undershirts (known as the “ DS9-style ”), which was used through Star Trek Nemesis and were also used in this series, starting with " Rapture " and for the remainder of this series, though the old DS9-style uniforms in this series appeared four more times following the uniform change in the episodes, " In Purgatory's Shadow " and " By Inferno's Light " as well as seen on a photograph of " Field of Fire " and in the flashback scenes of " What You Leave Behind ".

Background information [ ]

Development [ ].

The decision to set the series on a space station, rather than a starship, spawned when Brandon Tartikoff originally approached Rick Berman about the show, in 1991, and specifically said he wanted it to have a format that was new for Star Trek but was classically western; if The Next Generation was Wagon Train in space, Deep Space Nine was to be The Rifleman in space – a man and his son coming to a dilapidated frontier town on the edge of known civilization. Berman brought this concept to Michael Piller , and together they set about creating a western in space. As Robert Hewitt Wolfe later explained, " We had the country doctor , and we had the barkeeper , and we had the sheriff and we had the mayor , we had it all, it was all there. We had the common man, Miles O'Brien , the Native American, Kira . " Indeed, the producers initially discussed setting the show at a colony on an alien planet rather than on a space station. This idea was ultimately rejected because it was felt that it would involve too much location shooting, and because they felt that fans of Star Trek wanted to see story lines set primarily in space , not on a planet. ( New Frontiers: The Story of Deep Space Nine , DS9 Season 2 DVD special features)

The change of venue to a space station was largely intended to differentiate DS9 from The Next Generation , because the producers felt that having two shows about a starship airing simultaneously would be unacceptable. As co-creator and executive producer Rick Berman later explained, " Because there were two years of overlap with The Next Generation , we could not create a show that took place on a spaceship. It just seemed ridiculous to have two shows and two casts of characters that were off going where no man has gone before. It was a land-based show, it was a show that in a sense was taking place on a space station. So it had to be an entirely different concept. " ( Deep Space Nine: A Bold Beginning , DS9 Season 1 DVD special features)

The decision to set the show on a fixed station rather than a traveling starship was also based upon a desire to look deeper into the actual workings of the Federation and to see how it dealt with the type of problems one wouldn't find in a show set upon a starship. Michael Piller felt that, by having the characters standing still, they would be forced to confront issues not usually applicable to people on a starship. Whereas on The Next Generation , issues raised each week could simply be forgotten about the following week as the ship visited somewhere else, on a space station, events couldn't be forgotten or left behind but instead had to have implications for the future. As Piller explained, " We didn't want to have another series of shows about space travel. We felt that there was an opportunity to really look deeper, more closely at the working of the Federation and the Star Trek universe by standing still. And by putting people on a space station where they would be forced to confront the kind of issues that people in space ships are not forced to confront. In a series that focuses on a starship, like the Enterprise , you live week by week. You never have to stay and deal with the issues that you've raised. But by focusing on a space station, you create a show about commitment. It's like the difference between a one-night stand and a marriage. On Deep Space Nine , whatever you decide has consequences the following week. So it's about taking responsibility for your decisions, the consequences of your acts. " ( Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion , p. ? ) Similarly, in 2002 , Piller stated, " If you look at The Next Generation , it's really about movement. You don't ever stay in one place long enough to get to know anybody. Well Deep Space Nine is a show where everybody is forced to stay week after week, so each episode, each show, is fundamentally dealing with the people who have to learn that actions have consequences, and they have to live with the consequences of their actions on a weekly basis. " ( New Frontiers: The Story of Deep Space Nine , DS9 Season 2 DVD special features)

Setting the show in a fixed location meant that a large cast of recurring characters could be built up with relative ease; much more so than in The Original Series or The Next Generation before it, or Star Trek: Voyager , Star Trek: Enterprise , or Star Trek: Discovery since. As Rick Berman, speaking in 2002, stated, " The show was land-based, but the benefit we got from that was that by staying in one place, it enabled us to create twenty or thirty secondary and recurring characters, which really enriched the show because of all the multi-layers of relationships that have existed over the years. It's a very character-driven show as a result, and I think that makes it quite unique. " ( Deep Space Nine: A Bold Beginning , DS9 Season 1 DVD special features)

The decision to set the show in a fixed location was regarded as a benefit by the series' staff writers. For example, Ira Steven Behr , speaking in 1996 , commented, " We have certain advantages that I think no other Star Trek series has had, because we do have a base of operations that doesn't travel through space, which is the space station. Every story we do, the repercussions, the consequences don't disappear. It's not like the other shows where you have an adventure and then you zoom off into the great unknown. We are here, we have made a home, what we do has consequences. And I think we're able to do this mosaic, this fabric of life in the future, which I like. " Similarly, Robert Hewitt Wolfe, speaking in 2002, stated, " I think if Next Generation and The Original Series were about going out there and discovering new things about other races, Deep Space Nine is about staying in one place and discovering new things about ourselves. Not that we didn't go out there and discover things, but we had the same characters, we didn't change location every week. Sisko couldn't just solve a problem and sail off into the sunset, and never have to go back to that place again. That place was always there, and that problem could always come back to haunt him. So, in a lot of ways, it was a more complex show. " ( New Frontiers: The Story of Deep Space Nine , DS9 Season 2 DVD special features)

The series was designed to have more interpersonal conflict than its predecessors, while still staying true to the universe that Gene Roddenberry had created. Rick Berman commented, " [Deep Space 9]'s an alien space station that doesn't work the way they want it to, and that in itself created a lot of conflict. At the same, our core characters are Starfleet officers; Sisko, O'Brien, the doctor and Dax in no way vary from The Next Generation in terms of the lack of conflict among themselves. That was a rule we had to follow. " ( Captains' Logs Supplemental - The Unauthorized Guide to the New Trek Voyages , p. 5) Berman also commented, " What we wanted to do was something that was almost paradoxical – bring conflict but not break Gene's rules. They still play paramount importance in what we're doing. We created an environment where Starfleet officers were in a location that they weren't happy about being in, and they were in a location where the people who lived there weren't all that happy about them being there. " ( Captains' Logs Supplemental - The Unauthorized Guide to the New Trek Voyages , p. 8)

The show's main cast was intentionally assembled to create conflict (Quark and Odo, Kira and Sisko, etc.), so as to contrast the relatively tranquil atmosphere aboard Federation starships. This was another very specific decision taken by the producers. Gene Roddenberry's golden rule was that there was to be no conflict among Starfleet characters, so the producers decided to introduce non-Starfleet characters so conflict could come from within the show rather than always coming from outside (as it did on TNG). Rick Berman recalled, " We [....] created a situation where we had people who were members of our core group who were not Starfleet: the security shapeshifter Odo; the Bajoran Major, Kira; the bartender, Quark. A group of our integral people are not Starfleet officers, and the ones that are Starfleet officers aren't crazy about where they are, so we have a lot of frustration and conflict. " ( Captains' Logs Supplemental - The Unauthorized Guide to the New Trek Voyages , p. 8) Writer Joe Menosky explained, " You can see right away they're not the perfectly engineered Humans of TNG. They seem more real. I don't know if that makes them as attractive to viewers or not. But they are really different, and they represent a different way to tell a story. And it was definitely a conscious choice to create that potential for conflict. " Similarly, Berman stated, " Viewers didn't see that group of loving family members that existed on the first two Star Trek shows. " ( Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion , p. ? ) Michael Piller also commented on this somewhat controversial aspect of the show; " One of the primary goals of the development process was to come up with a show that had more inherent conflict than The Next Generation . In order to do that, you have to understand that Gene Roddenberry had a very specific vision for Humanity in the 24th century. What that meant for The Next Generation was that everybody gets along remarkably well on the Enterprise . There's very little room for interpersonal conflict between those people. In this series, we set out to create a situation that would provide natural conflict. We've populated the show with several aliens, primarily Bajorans , as we are stationed on the edge of the Bajoran star system . And the Bajorans are very different people than we are. They are people who are very spiritual and mystical and have a whole different way of looking at life than the 24th century humanist views which many of our Starfleet people will have. So immediately, there are conflicts. And then there's additional aliens from elsewhere who are thrown into the mix. So, as regular characters, not all the people are Starfleet, not all the people are Human, and as a result, you have this continuing conflict, because people who come from different places, honorable, noble people, will naturally have conflicts. " ( Deep Space Nine: A Bold Beginning , DS9 Season 1 DVD special features)

Unlike with TOS and TNG, Gene Roddenberry wasn't directly involved in conceptualizing DS9. Regarding Roddenberry's involvement in the series, Rick Berman stated, " Michael and I discussed it with Gene when we were still in the early stages, but never anything conceptual. " " We never got a chance to discuss it (the concept) with Gene. By the time we had it to the point that it was discussable, he was in pretty bad shape and not really in the condition that it would have been wise to discuss it with him. On two specific occasions I was with him at his house and we tried to bring it up, but it wasn't really appropriate. " ( Captains' Logs: The Unauthorized Complete Trek Voyages , p. 328) Director Paul Lynch remarked, " My gut feeling is that Gene would be jumping up and down. This is definitely a different take on what Gene spawned, but I think he would love it [....] While it's quite different, Deep Space Nine is also, in many ways, quite the same. All of Gene's moral requirements are upheld in this show. If we've done anything, we've expanded on what Gene created. " ( The Official Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Magazine issue 1 , pp. 10 & 12)

Initially, Berman and Piller were at a loss for a title for the series and toyed with calling the series "The Final Frontier". During further development, the station was temporarily dubbed "Deep Space Nine", which not only stuck permanently as the name of the station, but also the title of the show itself. Despite this, the two co-creators were reportedly dissatisfied with the name. ( Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Unauthorized Story , pp. 17-18)

Miles O'Brien was brought aboard DS9 and made a part of the space station's senior staff because the producers felt that Colm Meaney was too talented an actor to confine his character to a transporter room . Additionally, they hoped the TNG crossover would help boost the new series' ratings.

In the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion , p. ? , Michael Piller explained the rationale behind each of the principal cast members, why each character was chosen, and what each one was to bring to the mix;

  • Jadzia Dax: " The Trill is a great race. They had some interesting ramifications on TNG. A Trill character would provide great potential for dichotomy and paradox. "
  • Odo: " We knew that we needed some kind of Data / Spock character who looks at the world from the outside in. And the idea that an alien entity would have to find some way to pass as Human was fascinating, and seemed to give us an avenue into the kind of 'complexion of Humanity' stories that we wanted to tell. "
  • Quark: " A Ferengi would provide the show with instant humor and built-in conflict. I saw Quark as the bartender who is a constant thorn in the side of law and order, but who has a sense of humor about it. He'd be someone who could obviously throw lots of story dynamics into play. "
  • Julian Bashir: " We decided to create a flawed character. He'd have to be brought down to size in order to grow. And we wrote him as kind of a jerk for much of the first season . "
  • Miles O'Brien: " After we decided we were bringing him over to the new show, we thought, 'How do we use him?' We'd already decided to focus on Bajor, with this long backstory, establishing his bitterness towards the Cardassians , so it worked very nicely together. "
  • Kira Nerys: " We liked the idea of having somebody working with the commander of the station who would be a thorn in his side, who would represent a different point of view. We knew we'd get conflict and interesting dynamics between the two characters. "
  • Benjamin Sisko: " Every hero needs a journey. You want to take your leading man on a quest where he has to overcome personal issues as well as whatever space stuff happens to be out there. The idea of a man who is broken and who begins to repair himself is always a great beginning for drama. "

The first officer aboard DS9 would have been Ro Laren , but she was replaced by Kira Nerys ( Nana Visitor ) because Michelle Forbes did not want to commit to a six-year contract working on DS9. Indeed, the reason the producers had decided to set the show on Bajor in the first place was because of Ro.

Following the highly rated appearance of James Doohan as Montgomery Scott in TNG : " Relics ", it was reported, in 1993, that Doohan had been urging Paramount to add him to the cast of DS9. It was also rumored that William Shatner had expressed interest in participating in DS9 in some capacity. ( Trek: Deep Space Nine: The Unauthorized Story , p. 15)

During pre-production for the series, the producers were especially keen to ensure that the aesthetic of the show was very different from anything yet seen in the Star Trek universe. For example, Director of Photography Marvin Rush said the producers told him that they wanted "a darker, more sinister place" than the Enterprise -D. Rush himself described the final look as "dark and shadowy." Similarly, Herman Zimmerman said, " The marching orders for the station were to make it bizarre. " Finally, Supervising Producer David Livingston summed up the differences between DS9 and TNG by comparing the Enterprise 's bridge with Deep Space 9's Ops ; " The bridge is a very easy set to shoot. It's a three-wall open set with a lot of room, big and cavernous. Ops, on the other hand, is a multilevel set with a lot of cramped areas and very contrasty lighting. It's more interesting visually. " ( Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion , p. ? ) As Colm Meaney elaborated, " Because it was an alien space station, it gives the whole thing a very different feel I think to Next Generation or the original show, where you have the Enterprise , which is this very perfect environment. This is much more kind of dark and eerie, and also nothing works, the whole thing is a terrible mess. " ( Deep Space Nine Scrapbook: Year One , DS9 Season 1 DVD special features)

From the very beginning, DS9's darker aesthetic, more antagonistic characters and less Utopian setting were somewhat controversial among die-hard fans of Gene Roddenberry's universe. As Ira Steven Behr, speaking in 1996 (about halfway through the show's seven-year run), stated, " At the beginning of Deep Space Nine 's life, there was feelings that this was not a show that Gene would approve of by some of the fans, feeling that, you know, we had gone away from the image of the future as a paradise, that we had much more conflicts between our people, life isn't always great. But I think Gene, just by his very nature as a creative individual, as a writer, as a forward-thinking person, knows that any franchise has to move forward like a shark, or it dies. And I think he would understand what we're doing, and I think he would like what we're doing, and I think we're in the pocket of the Star Trek universe, and we try to push the envelope. And I see nothing wrong with that, and I have a hard time believing that Gene would see anything wrong with that. " ( New Frontiers: The Story of Deep Space Nine , DS9 Season 2 DVD special features) The sense that DS9 was too "dark" to be a Star Trek show only increased over the years, with episodes such as " Nor the Battle to the Strong ", " In the Pale Moonlight " and " The Siege of AR-558 ", and topics such as Section 31 charting territory never before seen on a Star Trek show, and creating a great deal of controversy among fans of both The Original Series and The Next Generation .

Robert Hewitt Wolfe recalled that Sisko holding the rank of commander led to unfavorable comparisons to the other series. " Whenever people would do articles about Star Trek they would talk about the three captains: Kirk , Picard , and Janeway . " The decision to promote Sisko to captain was prompted by the producers feeling that he deserved the higher rank as much as the other lead characters. ( Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion , p. 253)

Identifying one way in which he believed DS9 differed from TNG, Colm Meaney stated, " On Next Generation they were dealing with more philosophical ponderings where we on DS9 tend to deal with more hands-on immediate crises that I think of as more resonant with the problems we have in the world today [….] I think that's probably the single main difference. We connect more with contemporary issues, issues relevant to the 1990s, than did Next Generation." ("Mr. Goodwrench", Star Trek: Communicator  issue 105 , p. 20)

Serialization [ ]

The series is best remembered for an approach to serialization, predating the format of the late-2010s Star Trek series. Ira Behr commented: " The fact that Discovery is serialized or that Picard is serialized doesn't mean much to me, because how could they not be serialized in 2019? They get to just stay with the times. It's easy to be serialized now. Thank God they're doing that, but it would only be worthy of discussion if they didn't do it. The serialization was a bold move. I look back at it now and I was really a bit of an asshole, because everyone was saying people can't keep up with it. The show was syndicated and on at different times. I didn't care about any of that. I just wanted to do the best show we could do. I could understand why certain people involved and other producers and studios would feel that that was a little bit of an annoying take, because it did hurt the fan base, but at the time, I wasn't thinking about the future. I just wanted to do the best show we could do ". [1]

Ron Moore commented, " I think a lot of Battlestar was born at Deep Space Nine in that Deep Space started as much more episodic because of the nature of the show, it became more a continuing serialised structure. I really liked that, and I discovered I really liked that style of storytelling, and also particularly when we got into the later years of Deep Space , and we started telling the Dominion War story (1997-99), we would sit and argue and fight with the powers that be at Trek about making it a more realistic war, about making it grittier, and ugly; adding more ambiguity to the characters, and roughing it up a little bit, and I kept bumping my head against the strictures at Trek . What Star Trek is could not accommodate things that I wanted to do, so I started to have this sort of pent up frustration about ‘well if we were really going to do it right’, these ideas would sit in the back of my head so when Battlestar came along, I could now do all of those things that I was never allowed to do at Deep Space . " [2]

Due to the non-episodic nature of DS9, some of the series was lost on the casual viewer when it first aired. Many also believe that the changing television landscape contributed to DS9's ratings trouble, as local TV stations which had aired TNG in prime time became WB and UPN affiliates and pushed syndicated programming to the margins. Subsequent Star Trek shows Star Trek: Voyager and Star Trek: Enterprise had network support from UPN and a guaranteed time slot. DS9 was also the only series to run opposite another Star Trek show (first The Next Generation , then Voyager ) for the entirety of its run (the first twelve episodes of the third season aired without another series on). Additionally, certain markets, notably in the UK, would only play one Star Trek series, in its entirety, at a time. Thus, events alluded to in The Next Generation or Voyager that happened in Deep Space Nine took months to "sync up."

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine was nominated for 32 Emmy Awards , mostly in "technical" categories such as visual effects and makeup. It won four: "Outstanding Individual Achievement in Main Title Theme Music", "Outstanding Individual Achievement in Special Visual Effects", and "Outstanding Individual Achievement in Makeup for a Series" (twice).

Deep Space Nine remained a fan-favorite series throughout its seven-year run, with reviewers consistently lauding the series for its bold shift in tone from The Next Generation . Most notable among such changes was the concept of inter-personal conflict – something which Gene Roddenberry himself was said to have forbidden.

Said Ronald D. Moore , DS9 producer and screenwriter:

"I'd like us to be remembered as the Trek series that dared to be different. We took chances in a franchise that has every reason to play it safe and spoon-feed the same old thing to the audience week after week. We challenged the characters, the audience, and the Star Trek universe itself. Sometimes we failed (sometimes spectacularly) but we never stopped trying to push the show into new directions."

Robert Hewitt Wolfe remarked, " The truth of DS9 is, we had a great ensemble cast. Michael Piller created all these terrific characters [with the exception of Worf]." ("Flashback: The Way of the Warrior", Star Trek Magazine  issue 127 )

Several former producers and head writers from DS9 have been involved in other sci-fi series, including the creation of the "re-envisioned" Battlestar Galactica , as well as The 4400 , Farscape , Medium and Outlander .

In 2019, the documentary What We Left Behind was released. The documentary featured interviews with the actors, writers, production staff and fans, as well as featuring segments in which the writers pitched a new episode.

There was also a rivalry with another popular and critically acclaimed television series, Babylon 5 , created and produced by J. Michael Straczynski for Warner Bros. The two productions, which ran largely concurrently, were observed to be so similar that Babylon 5 fans accused Paramount, to whom Straczynski had previously pitched his series, of plagiarism. Considering how fellow Star Trek alumni like Walter Koenig and Andreas Katsulas had major roles in the rival series, Majel Barrett-Roddenberry agreed to a guest appearance in Babylon 5 as a gesture of goodwill to encourage a reconciliation between the two sets of fans. Rick Berman commented that rivalry was: " purely a fan thing, " adding: " there was a time when, I don’t know whether it was specifically Straczynski or other people, it was implied that he had pitched an idea similar to DS9 to Paramount and that it had been rejected and that, lo and behold, a year or so later DS9 came about. The implication being that Michael Piller and I perhaps stole all or part of his idea, which was always amusing to Michael and I because it was completely untrue. We had no knowledge of this gentleman. If he did pitch something to Paramount, we never heard about it. DS9 was a show that was created by Michael and me and Brandon Tartikoff, who was the recent head of Paramount at the time, without any knowledge of Straczynski or of anything that he had ever pitched. So when we were accused of stealing his idea it was a little sad but at the same time a little comical to us. " [3]

Main cast [ ]

DS9 cast promotional shot

The first season promotional image of the cast of Deep Space Nine

Starring [ ]

  • Avery Brooks as Commander / Captain Benjamin Sisko

Also starring [ ]

  • Rene Auberjonois as Odo
  • Nicole de Boer as Ensign / Lieutenant jg Ezri Dax ( 1998 - 1999 )
  • Michael Dorn as Lt. Commander Worf ( 1995 - 1999 )
  • Siddig El Fadil as Doctor Bashir
  • Terry Farrell as Lieutenant / Lt. Commander Jadzia Dax ( 1993 - 1998 )
  • Cirroc Lofton as Jake Sisko
  • Colm Meaney as Chief O'Brien
  • Armin Shimerman as Quark
  • Nana Visitor as Major / Colonel Kira

Special guest stars [ ]

  • Steven Berkoff as Hagath
  • Rosalind Chao as Keiko O'Brien
  • Jeffrey Combs as Weyoun
  • Meg Foster as Onaya
  • Jonathan Frakes as Thomas Riker / William T. Riker
  • Louise Fletcher as Winn Adami
  • Salome Jens as the Female Changeling
  • Penny Johnson as Kasidy Yates
  • Richard Kiley as Gideon Seyetik
  • Richard Libertini as Akorem Laan
  • Andrea Martin as Ishka
  • Bill Mumy as Kellin
  • Brock Peters as Joseph Sisko
  • Andrew Robinson as Elim Garak
  • Tim Russ as Tuvok
  • William Sadler as Sloan
  • Michael Sarrazin as Trevean
  • Wallace Shawn as Grand Nagus Zek
  • Kurtwood Smith as Thrax
  • Patrick Stewart as Jean-Luc Picard / Locutus of Borg
  • Leigh Taylor-Young as Yanas Tigan
  • Clarence Williams III as Omet'iklan

Special appearances by [ ]

  • Bernie Casey as Calvin Hudson
  • James Darren as Vic Fontaine
  • Robert Picardo as Lewis Zimmerman / Emergency Medical Holographic program
  • Chris Sarandon as Martus Mazur
  • Vanessa Williams as Arandis

Recurring characters [ ]

  • Cecily Adams and Andrea Martin as Ishka
  • Marc Alaimo as Gul Dukat
  • Philip Anglim as Vedek Bareil
  • Casey Biggs as Damar
  • Jeffrey Combs as Liquidator Brunt
  • Max Grodénchik as Rom
  • Aron Eisenberg as Nog
  • Hana Hatae as Molly O'Brien
  • J.G. Hertzler as General Martok
  • Barry Jenner as Admiral Ross
  • David B. Levinson as Broik
  • Kenneth Marshall as Michael Eddington
  • Chase Masterson as Leeta
  • Robert O'Reilly as Chancellor Gowron
  • Duncan Regehr as Shakaar
  • Andrew J. Robinson as Elim Garak
  • Mark Allen Shepherd as Morn

Executive producers [ ]

  • Rick Berman – Executive Producer
  • Michael Piller – Executive Producer (1993–1995)
  • Ira Steven Behr – Executive Producer (1995–1999)

Staff writers [ ]

  • Ira Steven Behr , Staff Writer
  • Hans Beimler , Staff Writer (1995–1999)
  • René Echevarria , Staff Writer ( 1994 –1999)
  • Ronald D. Moore , Staff Writer (1994–1999)
  • Bradley Thompson , Staff Writer ( 1996 –1999)
  • David Weddle , Staff Writer (1996–1999)
  • Robert Hewitt Wolfe , Staff Writer (1993– 1997 )

Episode list [ ]

Season 1 [ ].

DS9 Season 1 , 19 episodes:

Season 2 [ ]

DS9 Season 2 , 26 episodes:

Season 3 [ ]

DS9 Season 3 , 26 episodes:

Season 4 [ ]

DS9 Season 4 , 25 episodes:

Season 5 [ ]

DS9 Season 5 , 26 episodes:

Season 6 [ ]

DS9 Season 6 , 26 episodes:

Season 7 [ ]

DS9 Season 7 , 25 episodes:

Related topics [ ]

  • DS9 directors
  • DS9 performers
  • DS9 recurring characters
  • DS9 studio models
  • DS9 writers
  • Character crossover appearances
  • Undeveloped DS9 episodes
  • Paramount Stage 4
  • Paramount Stage 17
  • Paramount Stage 18
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine novels
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine comics (IDW)
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine comics (Malibu)
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine comics (Marvel)
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine soundtracks
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine on VHS
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine on LaserDisc
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine on DVD

External links [ ]

  • List of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine characters at Wikipedia
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine at Memory Beta , the wiki for licensed Star Trek works
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine at the Internet Movie Database
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine at TV.com
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine episodes at the iTunes Store
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine at StarTrek.com
  • Star Trek: Deep Space Nine at Wikiquote
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Screen Rant

Ronald d. moore's first star trek episode foreshadowed his ds9 & battlestar galactica future.

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7 Streaming Sci-Fi Series To Watch In Between Star Trek Shows

Recasting star trek: the next generation for a movie reboot, bridgerton season 4's lead comes down to 3 characters, says showrunner.

  • Writing "The Bonding" for ST: TNG was a pivotal moment for Ronald D. Moore, setting the stage for his darker, character-driven work on future shows.
  • Moore's focus on Klingon culture in TNG & DS9 laid the groundwork for his exploration of complex political and moral conflicts in Battlestar Galactica.
  • Moore's impact on the Star Trek franchise cannot be overstated, as his scripts for TNG and DS9 reshaped Klingon lore and deepened the exploration of death and grief in the Trek universe.

Ronald D. Moore's first Star Trek script for Star Trek: The Next Generation hinted at the types of stories he would go on to write on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Battlestar Galactica. Following the adventures of Captain Jean-Luc Picard (Patrick Stewart) and the USS Enterprise-D, TNG is Star Trek at its most optimistic. Star Trek creator Gene Roddenberry remained involved during TNG's early years, and he wanted to depict a utopian, conflict-free version of humanity's future. Still, TNG occasionally tackled tough issues, such as its exploration of death in Star Trek: The Next Generation season 3, episode 5, "The Bonding," the first Star Trek episode written by Ronald D. Moore.

A fan of Star Trek: The Original Series, Ronald D. Moore got the chance to visit the set of Star Trek: The Next Generation during the show's second season, and he handed a script he'd written to one of Gene Roddenberry's assistants. While working on TNG season 3, executive producer Michael Piller found Moore's script, purchased it, and it became "The Bonding." Moore was then selected to write another episode, "The Defector," and he went on to join TNG's writing staff, writing or co-writing 27 episodes. Moore then joined the production staff of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, and Star Trek: Voyager, before eventually moving on to develop the 2004 reboot of Battlestar Galactica .

There may be a long wait between live-action Star Trek series, but here are seven other sci-fi shows worth checking out in the meantime.

How Ron Moore's First Star Trek: TNG Episode Foreshadowed DS9 & Battlestar Galactica

"the bonding" deals with themes of death, grief, and loss..

Ronald D. Moore's first Star Trek: The Next Generation episode , "The Bonding", centers on young Jeremy Aster (Gabriel Damon), whose mother Marla (Susan Powell) is killed while on an away mission. Having previously lost his father, the now-orphaned Jeremy struggles to come to terms with his mother's death. As the leader of the ill-fated away mission and a fellow orphan, Lt. Worf (Michael Dorn) feels responsible for Jeremy and offers to perform a Klingon bonding ritual with the young boy. Jeremy's struggle is further complicated when a non-corporeal alien takes the form of Marla, claiming to be Jeremy's mother returned from the dead.

"The Bonding's" alien plotline, added to appease Gene Roddenberry, feels somewhat disconnected from the story's main theme as an exploration of death and grief. Still, there are some great character moments throughout "The Bonding," from Worf's anger and discussion about his own parents to Wesley Crusher's (Wil Wheaton) memories of his father's death. It's these character moments that feel like foreshadowing for the character work Moore would do as a writer on Star Trek: Deep Space Nine and Battlestar Galactica . Not only are both of these shows darker in tone than TNG, but they also regularly explore death, grief, and loss.

Ronald D. Moore also developed Starz's Outlander and Apple TV+'s For All Mankind , and he currently serves as an executive producer on both series.

Ronald D. Moore Became Star Trek's "Klingon Guy"

Moore helped shape the klingon culture and politics of the tng era..

Throughout Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Ronald D. Moore penned some of the franchises's most significant Klingon episodes. Moore's first Klingon-centric episode, TNG season 3, episode 17, "Sins of the Father," not only dove into Worf's past, but also introduced the Klingon home world of Qo'noS , the Klingon High Council, and the Klingon Chancellor. Moore also wrote the excellent TNG two-parter "Redemption," which continued to explore Klingon politics. On DS9, Moore wrote several more episodes that dealt with Klingon culture, including "You Are Cordially Invited...," which saw Worf marry the love of his life, Jadzia Dax (Terry Farrell).

Ronald D. Moore's contributions to the Star Trek franchise cannot be overstated.

Ron Moore's obvious interest in Klingon culture and politics also foreshadows his eventual work on Battlestar Galactica . Centering on the surviving remnants of a devastated civilization, Battlestar Galactica is full of complex political and moral conflicts as the titular battleship leads the surviving fleet of fugitives in search of safety. Having written several of the TNG era's most iconic films and episodes (including TNG's series finale and Star Trek: First Contact with co-writer Brannon Braga), Ronald D. Moore's contributions to the Star Trek franchise cannot be overstated. And it all began with a spec script written for Star Trek: The Next Generation .

Star Trek: The Next Generation & Star Trek: Deep Space Nine are available to stream on Paramount+.

Battlestar Galactica is available to stream on Amazon Prime Video.

Star Trek: The Next Generation

Star Trek: The Next Generation is the third installment in the sci-fi franchise and follows the adventures of Captain Jean-Luc Picard and the crew members of the USS Enterprise. Set around one hundred years after the original series, Picard and his crew travel through the galaxy in largely self-contained episodes exploring the crew dynamics and their own political discourse. The series also had several overarching plots that would develop over the course of the isolated episodes, with four films released in tandem with the series to further some of these story elements.

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, also known as DS9, is the fourth series in the long-running Sci-Fi franchise, Star Trek. DS9 was created by Rick Berman and Michael Piller, and stars Avery Brooks, René Auberjonois, Terry Farrell, and Cirroc Lofton. This particular series follows a group of individuals in a space station near a planet called Bajor.

Battlestar Galactica

The 2004 science fiction TV series Battlestar Galactica is a reimagining of the 1978 series of the same title. Created by Glen A. Larson, the original Battlestar Galactica features a fictional human civilization living in a distant star system called the Twelve Colonies. They are in constant battle against a cybernetic race called the Cylons, who want to exterminate the human race. A massive attack was launched, and only those who made it onboard the Battlestar Galactica and its fleet survived. They navigate space in search of the mythical 13th colony called Earth. Battlestar Galactica is under the command of President Laura Roslin (Mary McDonnell) and Colonial Fleet Officer, Admiral William Adama (Edward James Olmos).

Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987)

How Long It Would Take To Watch All of Star Trek (Yes, ALL of It)

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Over the five decades since its inception, the Star Trek universe continues to inspire new generations of Trekkies. The original series that began in the mid-1960s has spawned countless spinoffs in television shows, as well as animation and feature films, some of which are still under production.

Someone new to this massive franchise may be wondering just how long it will take to watch all of Star Trek. With so many series and films in the catalog, catching up on everything may seem like a daunting task. Even some diehard fans have no idea just how many episodes of Star Trek there are. This list will divide the franchise into different categories to show just how long it takes to watch them. This way, consuming the entire Star Trek saga won't seem so intimidating after all.

Updated by Robert Vaux on June 8, 2024: Star Trek stands at something of a crossroads with Discovery finishing its five-season run and Lower Decks preparing for its fifth and final season. Despite that, the franchise has a very bright future, with Star Trek: Strange New Worlds carrying the banner forward and projects like Star Trek: Section 31 in active production. The article has been updated to include information on ongoing Star Trek series, as well as new details on all of the entries in the franchise.

13 The Original Series Introduces Viewers to the Cast and Universe of Star Trek

Every star trek role played by clint howard, from tos to discovery.

Although Clint Howard has played four different roles across four eras of Star Trek, he's also the only actor to be on both TOS and Discovery to date.

For a series with so much significance in television and pop culture history, it's surprising to find out that Star Trek: The Original Series lasted for just 79 episodes over three seasons. Ironically, that's shorter than the "five-year mission" it touts in its opening credits. That was enough for it to enter syndication, however, which is where the bulk of its fans first discovered it.

Each TOS episode lasts around 50 minutes for a total of 3,950 minutes, meaning it will take just under 66 hours to watch them all uninterrupted. In other words, The Original Series can be finished in less than a week with constant binging. Even those who don't have that much time can finish watching the show in under a month by screening 2–3 episodes an evening. Unlike most subsequent Star Trek series, TOS episodes are designed to be interchangeable, so switching the viewing order won't disrupt any larger plot threads.

Star Trek: The Original Series

In the 23rd Century, Captain James T. Kirk and the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise explore the galaxy and defend the United Federation of Planets.

12 The Next Generation Found an Audience Starved for Science Fiction

Star Trek: The Next Generation was so successful during its seven-season run that it's arguably more popular today than The Original Series . It successfully released the series from covering the exploits of just one crew, and cemented the formula that every Star Trek series since then has followed. The Next Generation 's episode count topped its predecessor by almost a hundred for a total of 178 episodes, each with an approximately 44-minute runtime.

That adds up to a series total of 7,832 minutes or 130.5 hours — just under five and half days . If the viewer is free from work for about two weeks, The Next Generation series can be completed with ease. While it adopts a more formal structure than TOS -- with the characters advancing in age and experience from season to season -- most of its episodes are either stand-alone, or one of a two-part arc, making them very easy to enjoy in small 1-2 episode doses.

Star Trek: The Next Generation

Set almost 100 years after Captain Kirk's 5-year mission, a new generation of Starfleet officers sets off in the U.S.S. Enterprise-D on its own mission to go where no one has gone before.

11 Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Proved There Was Room for Multiple Star Trek Series

How star trek: discovery's trill story connects to dax on deep space nine.

Star Trek: Discovery returned to the Trill home world in Season 5 for a mission with a symbiont host that connects to Jadzia Dax on Deep Space Nine.

Near the end of Star Trek: The Next Generation 's run, Paramount created another series that could run alongside it. The new series broke from Star Trek tradition by being set on a space station, Deep Space 9, that connected the Federation to the Milky Way galaxy. It explored the darker side of the Final Frontier, culminating in the terrible threat of the Dominion War that forced the entire Alpha Quadrant to stand together.

Another breakout success, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine ran for another seven seasons from 1993 to 1999. Those seven seasons, comprise 176 episodes, each running an average 45 minutes. That's a grand total of 7920 minutes or exactly 132 hours. People willing to watch five episodes a night could likely finish it within a month's time. Deep Space Nine was the first Star Trek series to embrace longer and more complicated plot arcs. Viewers should be prepared for longer binges, or else break big story lines down into multiple viewing sessions.

Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

In the vicinity of the liberated planet of Bajor, the Federation space station Deep Space Nine guards the opening of a stable wormhole to the far side of the galaxy.

10 Star Trek Voyager Continued To Break From Traditions

Star Trek: Voyager took over after Star Trek: The Next Generation ended, ensuring there were still two Star Trek series on the air. The series went back to setting the series on the starship Voyager. T he Voyager is run by Captain Kathryn Janeway (Kate Mulgrew,) the franchise's first female lead , who aims to get her people home after being stranded. It took big risks on wild story lines, resulting in some of the saga's best episodes as well as its most bizarre.

Star Trek Voyager was another success for Paramount and their new network UPN, running for seven seasons. Like the prior show, each episode ran 45 minutes. At 172 episodes, that places the full series runtime at 7,740 minutes or 129 hours. This is another series that would require roughly a month of binging to get through. Its format is reasonably loose, however, and individual episodes can be readily watched without having to commit to anything more in a single viewing.

Star Trek Voyager

Pulled to the far side of the galaxy, where the Federation is seventy-five years away at maximum warp speed, a Starfleet ship must cooperate with Maquis rebels to find a way home.

9 Star Trek: Enterprise Is Star Trek's Last TV Series for Over a Decade

After running multiple Star Trek television series throughout the '90s, the franchise was gradually beginning to cool off. Finally, Paramount launched one more series, Star Trek: Enterprise . Unlike the others, Enterprise was intended as a prequel even to the original series. It followed Earth's first attempt at trying to make First Contact with other alien races. Led by Scott Bakula's Captain Archer, the first U.S.S. Enterprise paved the way for the founding of the United Federation of Planets.

Star Trek: Enterprise didn't quite have the same popularity that the other series did, and was hobbled by behind-the-scenes developments that had little to do with the show itself. Instead, it ran for four seasons and only 98 episodes. At 42 minutes an episode, that adds up to 4116 minutes, or 68.6 hours. That means it can be viewed in less time than the previous three Star Trek series, though it makes use of longer plot threads, and fans may need to plan for longer binges to get through them.

Star Trek: Enterprise

A century before Captain Kirk's five-year mission, Jonathan Archer captains the United Earth ship Enterprise during the early years of Starfleet, leading up to the Earth-Romulan War and the formation of the Federation.

8 Short Treks Offers Mini Side Stories

Some stories within the Star Trek universe don't need a full forty or fifty minutes to reach a satisfying conclusion. With that in mind, Bryan Fuller and Alex Kurtzman launched Star Trek: Short Treks . Running alongside Star Trek: Discovery , Short Treks gives viewers a chance for smaller stories to check out.

The project began back in 2018 with a season of four episodes, while a second season launched a year later with six episodes. The shows run from 8 to 18 minutes, and with only ten episodes, there are only 150 minutes so far . Fans can check that out in a single weekend. They're designed for easy single viewing sessions as well, and can even be added as riders to episodes of Discovery .

7 Star Trek: Picard Revisits Many of the Ideas From TNG

After years of fans watching stories about new characters, the new era of Star Trek finally decided to revisit an older era. In 2020, Star Trek: Picard decided to tell the first new story with Admiral Jean-Luc Picard since the Star Trek: The Next Generation films. Initially, Picard worked with a new cast that wasn't connected to the original series, but across the show, more of the classic characters were gradually added back in.

Star Trek: Picard ran for three seasons from 2020 to 2023, with ten episodes in each season for a total of thirty episodes. Episode lengths varied wildly since the series was on CBS All Access and could go from 39 minutes to 62 minutes. The full minute count, though, is 1350 minutes, or 22.5 hours. That's basically one solid weekend of marathoning or a week of leisurely watching episodes. Like Star Trek: Discovery , each season of Picard is based around a single large story line: allowing for single-season binges of about 10 hours apiece.

Star Trek: Picard

Follow-up series to Star Trek: The Next Generation (1987) and Star Trek: Nemesis (2002) that centers on Jean-Luc Picard in the next chapter of his life.

6 Animated Star Trek Series Have Become an Important Part of Star Trek

'hopefully we find a new home': jack quaid reacts to star trek: lower decks ending at paramount+.

Star Trek: Lower Decks' Jack Quaid laments the show ending while deeming himself "unbelievably grateful" for the chance to star in this world.

Star Trek: The Animated Series only lasted for two seasons in the early 1970s, releasing 22 episodes that were each 24 minutes long. Franchise creator Gene Roddenberry initially disowned the series -- making it hard to find for many years -- though it has since rejoined canon and now serves as the de facto fourth and fifth years of the original Enterprise's five-year mission. The Animated Series is only 528 minutes long or just under 9 hours. The whole series can be watched in just a single day, and individual episodes can be viewed as riders alongside TOS episodes.

Star Trek: Lower Decks premiered its first season in 2020 with 10 episodes. Each episode is 25 minutes long, totaling 250 minutes, meaning that the entire first season can be watched in just over four hours. Seasons 2 through 4 of Lower Decks also have 10 episodes each, making the total runtime around 1000 minutes. A final fifth season is planned, which will likely bring the total runtime up to around 1250 minutes or so. In addition, Very Short Treks is the most recent animated Star Trek series with five episodes, each running about 10-15 minutes long. All three animated series combined would take just under 1600 minutes or just under 27 hours.

Star Trek: Lower Decks

The support crew serving on one of Starfleet's least important ships, the U.S.S. Cerritos, have to keep up with their duties, often while the ship is being rocked by a multitude of sci-fi anomalies.

5 Currently Active Star Trek Series Continue To Expand Star Trek's Universe

At present, there are only three Star Trek series that are still running: Star Trek: Discovery , Star Trek: Prodigy , and Star Trek: Strange New Worlds . The first season of Prodigy is already out: 20 episodes amounting to a total of 480 minutes or 8 hours. A second (and presumably final) season is due in the summer of 2024, with another 20 episodes and another 480 minutes assumed in totem. That will boost the screening time for the entire series to 16 hours, or a single long day of binging.

Star Trek: Discovery has just completed its fifth and final season, leaving 65 episodes in its count with a total running time of 3,138 minutes or 52.3 hours . Episode lengths vary widely, as is typical in the streaming era, but average about 45 minutes apiece. Discovery uses season-long plot arcs the same way Picard does (it was originally conceived as an anthology series), and viewers who wish can comfortably binge a single season in a single day's viewing without trouble.

Finally, Strange New Worlds has two seasons with ten episodes in each, running a total of 1,082 minutes or a touch over 18 hours . That's short enough for a single-day binge. (A third season is on the way, which will add about another 9 hours to the total running time once complete.) Strange New Worlds emphasizes stand-alone episodes, making it very good for short viewing sessions of one or two episodes apiece.

Star Trek: Discovery

4 star trek: tos films gave the original series cast a comeback.

Ten years following the end of The Original Series , the adventures of Captain Kirk continued on the big screen. The TOS movies proved to be vital parts of the franchise, including such key moments as the death (and resurrection) of Mr. Spock and the original cast's formal good-bye at the end of the six-movie run.

Running times reflect the theatrical release of each movie, and may extend slightly, depending on whether any extended or alternate cuts are being viewed. Star Trek: The Motion Picture has a run time of 132 minutes. Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan , universally considered the best film in the franchise, is 113 minutes long. The Leonard Nimoy-directed Star Trek III: The Search for Spock is 105 minutes, and Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home is 122 minutes. William Shatner's Star Trek V: The Final Frontier is 106 minutes, and Nicholas Meyer's The Undiscovered Country has a 110-minute running time. Overall, the original film series clocks in at a total of 688 minutes, which equals 11 hours and 28 minutes.

3 Star Trek: TNG Movies Offer a Sense of Scale to the New Era

The Next Generation did not have the same big-screen success as the original series but made four films following the end of the show. The first film, Star Trek Generations , featured both Picard and Kirk and is 118 minutes long. The best-reviewed of the films, Star Trek: First Contact , clocks in at 111 minutes, Star Trek: Insurrection is shorter at 103 minutes, and the last film, Star Trek: Nemesis , is 116 minutes long.

The four Next Generation films combined run at a total of 448 minutes, equaling 7 hours and 28 minutes. Binging all four movies can be done within the span of a single day, though their varying quality may induce some viewers to break them down into shorter viewing periods.

2 The Kelvin Timeline Movie Series Press the Reset Button on the Series

Star trek is getting a kelvinverse origin, but why are fans skeptical.

Star Wars veteran Simon Kinberg has been added to an upcoming origin movie for Star Trek and the Kelvin Timeline universe, but fans aren't pleased.

The most recent movie series, known as The Kelvin Timeline films, takes place in an alternate reality featuring the crew from The Original Series. It was created when Spock attempted to stop the Romulan sun from going supernova and exists in a parallel-but-separate timeline from the rest of the series. It's credited with keeping the franchise going during the extended gap in TV series between the end of Star Trek: Enterprise and the beginning of Star Trek: Discovery .

The Kelvin movie franchise consists of three films, with each film varying in length. 2009's Star Trek runs 127 minutes, the 2013 sequel Star Trek Into Darkness is just five minutes longer at 132, and the latest film, Star Trek Beyond , is actually the shortest at 122 minutes. The film trilogy totals 381 minutes, or 6 hours and 21 minutes. New Trekkies can finish this trilogy very quickly.

1 How Many Hours of Star Trek Are There?

Did gene roddenberry try to have a gay character on the original star trek.

In the latest TV Legends Revealed, learn what Gene Roddenberry's plans were on having LGBTQ+ characters on the original Star Trek series

All 13 Star Trek films have a combined total of 25 hours and 28 minutes, or just over a full day. Every single television series, both currently airing and retired, totals up to around 48,700 minutes, which is approximately 812 hours or 33.8 days. Every series and movie combined totals 837.5 hours, meaning it will take 34.9 days to watch them all uninterrupted.

Obviously, watching them all consecutively is impossible, but realistically, watching everything in the Star Trek franchise could take less than half a year. This doesn't even include upcoming movies like Star Trek 4 and new seasons for existing series. For those who believe this beloved universe is worth investing over 50,200 minutes, it's time to boldly go where only die-hard Trekkies have gone before.

The Star Trek universe encompasses multiple series, each offering a unique lens through which to experience the wonders and perils of space travel. Join Captain Kirk and his crew on the Original Series' voyages of discovery, encounter the utopian vision of the Federation in The Next Generation, or delve into the darker corners of galactic politics in Deep Space Nine. No matter your preference, there's a Star Trek adventure waiting to ignite your imagination.

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Paula M. Block

Deep Space Nine Companion (Star Trek Deep Space Nine) Paperback – August 1, 2000

  • Print length 736 pages
  • Language English
  • Publisher Star Trek
  • Publication date August 1, 2000
  • Dimensions 8.5 x 1.25 x 10.75 inches
  • ISBN-10 0671501062
  • ISBN-13 978-0671501068
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  • Publisher ‏ : ‎ Star Trek; First Ed edition (August 1, 2000)
  • Language ‏ : ‎ English
  • Paperback ‏ : ‎ 736 pages
  • ISBN-10 ‏ : ‎ 0671501062
  • ISBN-13 ‏ : ‎ 978-0671501068
  • Item Weight ‏ : ‎ 3.2 pounds
  • Dimensions ‏ : ‎ 8.5 x 1.25 x 10.75 inches
  • #201 in TV Guides & Reviews
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Paula m. block.

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Terry J. Erdmann

Terry J. Erdmann is the author or co-author of numerous books about the entertainment industry, including Star Trek The Original Topps Trading Card Series, Star Trek The Next Generation 365, Star Trek The Original Series 365, Star Trek 101, Monk: The Official Episode Guide, The Last Samurai Official Companion, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Companion, The Secrets of Star Trek Insurrection, The Magic of Tribbles, The Tribble Handbook, Star Trek: Action! and The 4400 Companion. As a motion picture publicist, he helped to create the marketing campaigns for dozens of films, from Cocoon, Aliens and Willow, to What's Love Got to Do With It, Father of the Bride Part II, G.I. Jane and Star Trek V: The Final Frontier. Terry and his wife, writer Paula M. Block, live in Southern Oregon with their two collies, Shadow and Mandy.

Paula M. Block

PAULA M. BLOCK is the co-author of numerous books about the entertainment industry, including STAR TREK: THE ORIGINAL SERIES 365, STAR TREK 101, MONK: THE OFFICIAL EPISODE GUIDE, THE 4400:THE OFFICIAL COMPANION, STAR TREK: DEEP SPACE NINE COMPANION, THE SECRETS OF STAR TREK: INSURRECTION, STAR TREK: ACTION! and THE MAGIC OF TRIBBLES. She is also the co-editor of Pocket Books' popular short story series STAR TREK: STRANGE NEW WORLDS. Over the course of her lengthy and eclectic career in publishing, she has been a columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times, the Midwest correspondent for Biotechnology Newswatch, and the International Editor for Chemical Week. After nineteen years overseeing and editing licensed publishing for Paramount Pictures and CBS, Paula moved to Southern Oregon with her husband, author Terry J. Erdmann, and their two collies, Shadow and Mandy. The scenery may be different, but the writing goes on!

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  1. List of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine novels

    List of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine novels based on the American science fiction television series of the same name. The book line was published by Simon & Schuster imprints Pocket Books, Pocket Star, Gallery, and Atria. More recent Deep Space Nine novels link directly with other Star Trek book lines and series, such as: Destiny (2008), Typhon Pact (2010-2012), The Fall (2013-14), and the ...

  2. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

    Description / Buy at Amazon. The Star Trek: Deep Space Nine series is a series of novels based on the science fiction genre and written by a number of noteworthy authors. The series consists of a total of more than 60 novels published between the years 1993 and 2008. The novels of the Deep Space Nine series are directly based on the television ...

  3. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (27 book series) Kindle Edition

    Over the next twenty years, she published eighteen original novels and a handful of short stories, as well as tie-in novels for both Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (Proud Helios) and Star Trek: Voyager (The Garden). She won the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer in 1986, and won Lambda Literary Awards in 1994 for Trouble And Her Friends ...

  4. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Series by J.M. Dillard

    59 primary works • 67 total works. A Star Trek series. DS9 Series: * Deep Space Nine Avatar. * Left Hand of Destiny. * Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Millenium. * Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Mission Gamma. * Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Rebels. * Star Trek: Terok Nor.

  5. A Stitch in Time (Robinson novel)

    A Stitch in Time (ISBN -671-03885-0), published June 5, 2000, is a Star Trek: Deep Space Nine novel written by Andrew Robinson.The novel originated from a biography of Cardassian Elim Garak in the form of a diary which was written by Robinson after he landed the recurring role in the series. He would read extracts from it at Star Trek conventions for fans, and was heard by novelist David R ...

  6. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Reading List

    Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Reading List. The Deep Space Nine Reading List is centered around the Post-Finale Series, which chronicles events following the end of the Dominion War. This series jumped forward in time and was given a new primary author after the Destiny trilogy. Accordingly there are two good "jumping on points" below.

  7. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (Pocket)

    Star Trek: Deep Space Nine has been published in novel form by Pocket Books since 1993 in the USA, the UK, and the Republic of Ireland under license from Paramount Pictures. Beginning with Revenant in December 2021, Simon & Schuster started releasing Star Trek: Deep Space Nine novels under its Gallery Books imprint. Pocket Books was the first publisher given license by Paramount to produce a ...

  8. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Book Series

    The Star Trek: Deep Space Nine book series by multiple authors includes books Emissary, The Siege, Bloodletter, and several more. See the complete Star Trek: Deep Space Nine series book list in order, box sets or omnibus editions, and companion titles. 62 Books #1 ...

  9. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Series in Order

    The Star Trek: Deep Space Nine series does not have a new book coming out soon. The latest book, A Stitch in Time (Book 27), was published in May 2000. What was the first book written in the Star Trek: Deep Space Nine series?

  10. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

    While living on Deep Space NineTM, Jake Sisko has seen a lot of strange things, since his father, commander of the station, opened it to every lifeform who passes through this sector of space. But when Jake's Ferengi friend Nog says he's seen a ghost, Jake doesn't believe him, until a shimmering figure with glowing red eyes appears in Jake's quarters. Soon enough the spectre has Jake on a ...

  11. Avatar Book One (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine)

    Avatar Book One (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine) Mass Market Paperback - May 1, 2001. by S.D. Perry (Author) 4.3 322 ratings. Book 1 of 2: Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. See all formats and editions. In the uneasy ceasefire following the Dominion War, a surprise attack cripples Deep Space 9, killing hundreds and threatening the peace of the galaxy ...

  12. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Worlds of Deep Space Nine #1: Cardassia and

    Una McCormack is the author of ten previous Star Trek novels: The Lotus Flower (part of The Worlds of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine trilogy), Hollow Men, The Never-Ending Sacrifice, Brinkmanship, The Missing, the New York Times bestseller The Fall: The Crimson Shadow, Enigma Tales, Discovery: The Way to the Stars, the acclaimed USA Today ...

  13. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Reading List

    Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Reading List. The Deep Space Nine Reading List is centered around the Post-Finale Series, which chronicles events following the end of the Dominion War. This series jumped forward in time and was given a new primary author after the Destiny trilogy. Accordingly there are two good "jumping on points" below.

  14. Star Trek Deep Space Nine Books

    Star Trek Deep Space Nine Books Showing 1-50 of 152 Emissary (Paperback) by. J.M. Dillard (shelved 17 times as star-trek-deep-space-nine) avg rating 3.78 — 1,284 ratings — published 1993 Want to Read saving… Want to Read; Currently Reading ...

  15. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

    Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (DS9) is an American science fiction television series created by Rick Berman and Michael Piller.The fourth series in the Star Trek media franchise, it originally aired in syndication from January 3, 1993, to June 2, 1999, spanning 176 episodes over seven seasons. Set in the 24th century, when Earth is part of a United Federation of Planets, its narrative is centered ...

  16. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Relaunch (46 books)

    46 books based on 22 votes: A Stitch in Time by Andrew Jordt Robinson, Cardassia and Andor by Una McCormack, Star Trek: Deep Space Nine: Worlds of Deep S...

  17. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

    Star Trek: Deep Space Nine was the fourth Star Trek series and entered production in 1992. It was broadcast in first-run syndication from January 1993 until June 1999. It was the first Star Trek series created by Rick Berman and Michael Piller rather than by Gene Roddenberry. It was also the only series to air alongside another Star Trek production throughout its entire run, airing alongside ...

  18. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Star Trek Fiction, Books

    Explore our list of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Books at Barnes & Noble®. Get your order fast and stress free with free curbside pickup. ... Star Trek: Deep Space Nine 4; Standard Order. Prices. Under $5; $5 - $10; $10 - $25; $25 - $50; Formats. eBook; Paperback; Audiobook; Star Trek: Deep Space Nine. 1- 20 of 82 results

  19. Deep space nine reading order. : r/trekbooks

    Deep space nine reading order. Hey, so I'm a bit stuck. I have been reading the ds9 books in order. And i have just finished "Soul Key" and I'm lost with the reading order. I read the typon pact books. And "the fall" series (a while ago) Now every page I look at tells me a different readying order. I followed memory beta And the missing seems ...

  20. Emissary (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Book 1)

    An original novel based on the acclaimed Star Trek TV series! Commander Benjamin Sisko is just recovering from the death of his wife when he is assigned command over the former Cardassian, but new Federation space station, Deep Space Nine. This space station is strategically located not only because of its orbit about Bajor, but also because of ...

  21. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine #13

    Thank You. Catwoman (1993 series) #76 in Near Mint minus condition. DC comics [r' (#235569180256) Star Trek: Deep Space Nine #13 - (1993 series). AllStar Trek: Deep Space Nine comics. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine (1993 series) #13. 2 million comics sold. on sale here This comic is in Near Mint condition.

  22. Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

    The Star Ghost (Star Trek: Deep Space Nine Book 1) by Brad Strickland (Author) 4.3 4.3 out of 5 stars 22 3.6 on Goodreads 114 ratings. While living on Deep Space Nine TM, Jake Sisko has seen a lot of strange things, since his father, commander of the station, opened it to every lifeform who passes through this sector of space. But when Jake's ...

  23. Ronald D. Moore's First Star Trek Episode Foreshadowed His DS9

    Throughout Star Trek: The Next Generation and Star Trek: Deep Space Nine, Ronald D. Moore penned some of the franchises's most significant Klingon episodes. Moore's first Klingon-centric episode, TNG season 3, episode 17, "Sins of the Father," not only dove into Worf's past, but also introduced the Klingon home world of Qo'noS, the Klingon High Council, and the Klingon Chancellor.

  24. Star Trek Deep Space Nine Books

    Star Trek: Mirror Universe. 33 books — 1 voter. Star Trek Deep Space Nine genre: new releases and popular books, including Brinkmanship by Una McCormack, Revelation and Dust by David R. George III, Leg...

  25. Star Trek Watch Order

    In the 23rd Century, Captain James T. Kirk and the crew of the U.S.S. Enterprise explore the galaxy and defend the United Federation of Planets. Release Date. September 8, 1966. Creator. Gene Roddenberry. Cast. William Shatner , Leonard Nimoy , Deforest Kelley , Nicollette Sheridan. Main Genre.

  26. Deep Space Nine Companion (Star Trek Deep Space Nine)

    PAULA M. BLOCK is the co-author of numerous books about the entertainment industry, including STAR TREK: THE ORIGINAL SERIES 365, STAR TREK 101, MONK: THE OFFICIAL EPISODE GUIDE, THE 4400:THE OFFICIAL COMPANION, STAR TREK: DEEP SPACE NINE COMPANION, THE SECRETS OF STAR TREK: INSURRECTION, STAR TREK: ACTION! and THE MAGIC OF TRIBBLES.