Star Trek Into Darkness’ Alice Eve Defends That Controversial Underwear Scene

Star Trek Into Darkness was hit with criticism for this moment.

Alice Eve as Carol Marcus in underwear in Star Trek Into Darkness

Along with having played young Agent O in Men in Black 3 and Mary Walker in Netflix’s Iron Fist series , Alice Eve has genre cred from her time as Carol Marcus in Star Trek Into Darkness . When the second Kelvin Timeline-set Star Trek movie came out in 2013, it caught flak from various moviegoers for a scene where Chris Pine ’s James T. Kirk briefly sees Eve’s Carol stripped to her underwear. Nearly a decade later, Eve has come to the defense of that scene.

While promoting her upcoming sci-fi movie Warning , Alice Eve touched on the controversial Star Trek Into Darkness scene, which producer Damon Lindelof later apologized for, while director J.J. Abrams acknowledged that he understood the criticism. From Eve’s end, she was surprised the scene caused so much outcry, telling Inverse :

It was something I voluntarily worked with a trainer to be fit for, was very much prepared for, and very much enjoyed [doing] — filming, executing, promoting. The feeling I shouldn’t have done it, or that it was exploitation, was confusing to me.

The Star Trek Into Darkness moment in question happened right after Captain Kirk learned that the woman who boarded the U.S.S. Enterprise under the pseudonym Carol Wallace was actually Carol Marcus, daughter of Peter Weller’s Admiral Alexander Marcus. While speaking with Kirk about the torpedoes that Admiral Marcus ordered the Enterprise carry, Carol disrobed to put on a spacesuit in preparation to open up one of the torpedoes on a nearby planetoid. Kirk turned around after Carol had taken off her Starfleet uniform, and, well, the rest is history. You can watch it unfold below:

As laid out by her earlier comment, Alice Eve had no problem shooting that Star Trek Into Darkness scene, and despite being baffled by how much controversy it generated, eventually the actress set it all aside. In her words:

There are many things in the world that are confusing. I put it down to one of those anomalies. I’m proud of that scene, and all the work I did.

Alice Eve is the second actress to play Carol Marcus in the Star Trek film series, with the character originally being played by Bibi Besch in Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan . Star Trek Into Darkness was also notable for featuring Benedict Cumberbatch as a character first identified as John Harrison, but later revealed to be Khan Noonien Singh , who was originally played by Ricardo Montalbán. While Into Darkness wasn’t as critically well received as 2009’s Star Trek , it did outperform its predecessor commercially with a $467 million global box office haul.

Star Trek Into Darkness was followed by 2016’s Star Trek Beyond , and while the film side of this franchise has been in suspended animation since then, two separate movies are in development: one from Star Trek: Discovery writer Kalinda Vazquez , and the other from WandaVision director Matt Shakman , with Lindsey Beer and Geneva Robertson writing the script. There’s no word yet on which of these will take the June 9, 2023 release date Paramount Pictures has secured for a Star Trek movie.

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Alice Eve defends her controversial Star Trek scene: “I’m proud of that”

Alice Eve, who stars in the new sci-fi film Warning , reflects on her much-criticized Star Trek moment.

carol marcus star trek underwear scene

Star Trek once promised to boldly go where no man has gone before. But Alice Eve knows science fiction can go much further by foregrounding women within its strange new worlds.

“A lot of women in sci-fi are self-sufficient,” says the actress, who played one such character — Dr. Carol Marcus — in 2013’s Star Trek Into Darkness , though not without controversy. (More on that later.)

Still, more than 50 years after Star Trek first aired, “science fiction is not necessarily the domain of women in terms of creation” off-screen, Eve says. For all the Ellen Ripleys and Sarah Connors on screen, this lack of female perspective behind the camera can hold the genre back.

An English actress who’s also known for her roles in Men In Black 3 and on Marvel’s Iron Fist series, Eve is experienced at navigating this tension. Her latest film — Warning , from Polish director Agata Alexander — marks the first time Eve has made a sci-fi thriller with a female filmmaker.

“I wanted to support a woman tackling traditionally male subject matter,” Eve tells Inverse , speaking in support of the film (out now on digital platforms). “I loved her audacity. She had this grand vision she was determined to execute on a small budget. And she did.”

Broadly, Eve is a sci-fi fan. And playing characters like Star Trek ’s Carol Marcus is part of the appeal. “Sci-fi is cool because it shows powerful women,” Eve tells Inverse. “They're not usually married with kids. They’re working for their passion.”

In 2013, Eve found herself discussing the optics of female representation in sci-fi in a more negative sense. When Star Trek Into Darkness hit theaters, some audiences objected to a scene in which Marcus strips to her underwear and is glimpsed by a chastened Captain Kirk (Chris Pine).

Alice Eve Star Trek

After the release of Star Trek Into Darkness , Alice Eve found herself at the center of online debate about the portrayal of women in mainstream sci-fi.

A throwaway shot, it served little narrative purpose in the film’s theatrical cut. Online, the backlash was swift to what some saw as a gratuitous instance of a female character being unfairly sexualized. (Though, of course, there was also a backlash to this backlash. ) Eventually, producer Damon Lindelof apologized, and director J.J. Abrams conceded that he understood the criticism. Eve has spoken only sparingly about the incident but, looking back on the scene, remembers being taken aback by the controversy.

“It was something I voluntarily worked with a trainer to be fit for, was very much prepared for, and very much enjoyed [doing] — filming, executing, promoting,” recalls Eve, who says she was actively involved in discussing all her character’s scenes. “The feeling I shouldn’t have done it, or that it was exploitation, was confusing to me.”

Eventually, Eve shrugged it off: “There are many things in the world that are confusing. I put it down to one of those anomalies. I’m proud of that scene, and all the work I did.”

The experience was still eye-opening for the actress, leading her to seek out projects, like Warning, that would avoid the male gaze dominant in most Hollywood sci-fi. Told over a series of disconnected vignettes set during a freak storm, Warning stars Eve as Claire, a lonely woman whose daily life is dependent on a pyramid-shaped smart home device called “God 2.0.” (In real life, Eve avoids such smart devices.)

Living in a near-future where technology is seen as a substitute for human contact, Claire’s isolation is heightened by everyday interactions that are hostile, cold, and unfriendly. “People have their main relationship with their device and they lose the ability to connect, to feel each other and empathize,” Eve says. “To me, the ‘warning’ is to remain empathetic, to remain in tune” with humanity, she adds.

Eve found shooting Warning to be isolating, as her main scene partner is an inanimate object (voiced by actor James D’Arcy). “The pleasure of the movie was the experiment of not having another actor,” she says. “It’s different, but it was much more lonely.”

Alice Eve Warning

Alice Eve ( Star Trek Into Darkness ) stars as “Claire,” a lonely woman dependent on a smart home device called “God 2.0.”

Claire’s backstory isn’t deeply explored in Warning , but Eve and Alexander collaborated on the idea that her character’s vulnerability stemmed from heartbreak. “When we suffer heartbreak, we retreat,” she says. “And when we retreat, we don’t like to connect with people. And then she becomes reliant in that period of recovery on this device.”

Far from helping Claire, “the device hooks into her,” making Warning a cautionary tale, says Eve. Claire turns to God 2.0 in an almost fanatical way, with Warning taking an unsubtle stance against organized religion and its power to prey on people.

“She’s lured into this belief she'll be a better person,” says Eve. “Organized religion seduces people by telling them life will be better. It's old capitalism: You won’t be lonely and sad if you don’t commit sin . Obviously, it’s important to be a good person, but it’s not going to make your life better to live.”

carol marcus star trek underwear scene

A scene from Warning.

Eve is still learning all it can mean to be a woman in science fiction. She will soon star in The Power , an Amazon series based on Naomi Alderman’s 2016 novel in which women possess electric superpowers. Alderman is writing the adaptation of her own book, with Handmaid’s Tale director Reed Morano at the helm of at least one episode and an all-female writer’s room involved in the project.

Eve says the 10-episode series’ main concept is teased by its title: who gets to wield power, and what will they decide to do with it?

“ The Power is an idea of a future where women have power and are more physically capable than men,” she explains. In the series, Eve stars opposite Leslie Mann, Auliʻi Cravalho, Daniela Vega, Tim Robbins, Rob Delaney, and John Leguizamo.

“My character is something of a choir [for] understanding the story,” she says. “I think it’s a really important story to tell, to show us throw[ing] the world on its axis and show how much of our [society’s] power dynamic relies on physical strength.”

In the years since Alice Eve starred in Star Trek , she’s paid closer attention to how women have been represented in the final frontier and beyond.

“There’s a different generation coming up, and I hope they’re feeling empowered,” says Eve, praising the long-overdue reckoning that the #MeToo movement has played one part in triggering. “I believe we're all having a human experience, and that’s a painful thing to have.”

Warning is available on Digital, Blu-ray, and DVD on October 22.

  • Science Fiction

carol marcus star trek underwear scene

Alice Eve Says She’s Proud Of Controversial Star Trek Scene

Despite what many fans think, Alice Ever defends the scene taking place.

carol marcus star trek underwear scene

The Star Trek universe stands for a lot of things. Unity, collaboration, exploration, and doing what’s right are just a few of the things that come to mind.

However, in the 2013 movie Star Trek: Into Darkness , there was something else — an underwear scene from out of nowhere.

Actress Alice Eve played Dr. Carol Marcus, a science officer on the Enterprise. She had a vast knowledge of Starfleet weapons and was tasked with deactivating a torpedo in a scene with Captain Kirk (Chris Pine).

Other places to watch: Apple TV+ , Prime Video , Hulu

Eve changes into a jumpsuit and is shown in her underwear while Kirk takes a peek. Many fans still say the scene is gratuitous and unnecessary , especially in the sterile Star Trek universe. Take a look at the scene below.

In a recent interview promoting her new film Warning , Eve said she doesn’t agree with criticism about the scene. She said she prepared for it and was proud of it.

It was something I voluntarily worked with a trainer to be fit for, was very much prepared for, and very much enjoyed [doing] — filming, executing, promoting. The feeling I shouldn’t have done it, or that it was exploitation, was confusing to me. There are many things in the world that are confusing. I put it down to one of those anomalies. I’m proud of that scene, and all the work I did.

Eve has also talked in the past about women’s roles in sci-fi movies. “Science fiction is not necessarily the domain of women in terms of creation,” she said.

She’s had roles in other sci-fi projects as well, including Men In Black 3 and the Iron Fist series for Marvel.

Her latest film marks the first time she’s worked with a female filmmaker.

“I wanted to support a woman tackling traditionally male subject matter,” Eve said. “I loved her audacity. She had this grand vision she was determined to execute on a small budget. And she did.”

Check out the trailer for her new movie below.

This article includes affiliate links, which may provide small compensation to We Got This Covered.

Jon Silman

About the author

Jon Silman is a stand-up comic and hard-nosed newspaper reporter (wait, that was the old me). Now he mostly writes about Brie Larson and how the MCU is nose diving faster than that 'Black Adam' movie did. He has a Zelda tattoo (well, Link) and an insatiable love of the show 'Below Deck.'

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Damon Lindelof Apologizes for Carol Marcus' Underwear Scene in Star Trek Into Darkness

Screenwriter admits alice eve's scene was "gratuitous.".

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Star Trek Into Darkness

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Damon Lindelof Admits to ‘Gratuitous’ ‘Star Trek’ Strip Scene … and Bad Spelling

Women of America – particularly female "Star Trek" fans – Damon Lindelof has something to say to you: There was no practical reason for Alice Eve to appear in her lingerie, and he's sorry for that.

Monday night, Damon Lindelof, who is co-producer and co-screenwriter of "Star Trek: Into Darkness," took to his Twitter account to address the controversy that had been buzzing among a group of online commentators: Why does Alice Eve's character, gifted scientist Dr. Carol Marcus, strip down to her very special-occasion-looking bra and undies on camera before changing into a special armored space suit? The scene seemed designed to give fanboys in the audience a charge, and it did little to advance the plot.

Indeed it was a scene that could have been much more revelatory for Dr. Marcus and Captain Kirk's historic chemistry. Audiences found out in 1982's "Wrath of Khan,"that the two had a lovechild, after all.

In the first of several tweets, Lindelof spoke about the issue in no uncertain terms:

I copped to the fact that we should have done a better job of not being gratuitous in our representation of a barely clothed actress. — Damon Lindelof (@DamonLindelof) May 20, 2013

Lindelof then tweeted, somewhat in his own defense, "We also had Kirk shirtless in underpants in both movies. Do not want to make light of something that some construe as mysogenistic."

[Related: 9/11 Looms Large Over 'Star Trek Into Darkness' ]

Back on topic, Lindelof wrote, "What I'm saying is I hear you, I take responsibility and will be more mindful in the future."

The 40-year-old writer-producer wrapped up the thread with a self-deprecating spell check: "Also, I need to learn how to spell 'misogynistic.'"

Watch 'Star Trek Into Darkness' Profile -- Dr. Carol Marcus:

Lindelof isn't the only one to blame for Eve's undergarment moment in "Into Darkness." His partner in crime, director J.J. Abrams (and his former "Lost" television show co-creator) is known for adding bra-and-panties moments to most of his work -- including the first "Star Trek" reboot, his former television show "Alias," and "Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol."

Lindelof also addressed Eve's almost-nudity more than a week ago. MTV's Josh Horowitz asked him (in an email interview), "I feel like I have to start with the biggest mystery/conversation that's surrounded the film from the get go. Why is Alice Eve in her underwear at one point?"

Instead of owning it then, Lindelof offered a trademark explanation -- one often used to hush "Lost" fans over the show's many loose plot ends: "Why is Alice Eve in her underwear, gratuitously and unnecessarily, without any real effort made as to why in God's name she would undress in that circumstance? Well there's a very good answer for that. But I'm not telling you what it is. Because ... uh... MYSTERY?"

[Related: 'Star Trek' Villain Revealed: What's His Secret and Who Almost Played Him (Spoiler!) ]

Some naysayers are pointing out that playing up Eve's sexiness seems especially galling given how dramatically men outnumber women aboard the Starship Enterprise, with Lt. Uhura (Zoe Saldana) as the only female officer on board. Perhaps Lindelof and Abrams could consider adding some new female crew members in the next movie, in a bid to come closer to gender parity in the Final Frontier.

Private note to Lindelof: "Mysogenistic"? Dude, it's called spell check. You're a writer, don't you know how to use that?

Watch 'Star Trek Into Darkness' Clip -- Science Officer:

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Star Trek Into Darkness, Alice Eve, and expensive underwear

Was Alice Eve's Star Trek Into Darkness underwear scene justified, or merely a distraction? The latter, Simon writes...

carol marcus star trek underwear scene

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Slight spoiler: the name of Alice Eve’s character is mentioned in this article, in case you weren’t already aware of it.

The first three films of summer blockbuster season 2013 had a common thread to them. In Oblivion , it’s not long before leading actress Andrea Riseborough had shed clothes, and gone for a swim. In Iron Man 3 meanwhile, off comes Gwyneth Paltrow’s top, and she’s left standing in her bra. Both of these do, at a push, have some link to the story, whether you agree with them or not. Woman shedding clothes does seem to be a theme, though.

However, those two have nothing on Star Trek Into Darkness. It’s been two weeks now since I saw the film, and truthfully, I’m still struggling to wrap my head around Alice Eve’s sudden disrobing, to the point where she’s left standing in some reasonably posh-looking undercrackers.

What’s odd about the scene is how it sits in the film. It doesn’t lead anywhere. There’s no obvious build up or impact to it. It’s just an attractive woman standing around in lingerie, in the middle of a big science fiction blockbuster, which promptly then moves on.

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That Alice Eve was going to disrobe wasn’t a surprise. She appeared in this state in one of the trailers for the film, and I remember thinking then that the moment stuck out a little bit then. The internet thought the same thing, as a few seconds with Google can testify. It was as if wasn’t really a natural fit. Dara O Briain has a skit about “something for the dads” in his most recent stand-up tour ( Craic Dealer ), and this has it stamped all over it. 

When watching the film, it still came as a surprise. What was even more of a surprise was that the film cut away immediately afterwards. There was no sexual tension per se, and there was certainly no sex either. So, er, what actually was the reason it happened?

There’s an argument of double standards here, of course. Would we be reacting the same way if it was a man in his pants? Quite possibly not. But here’s my big, big problem with Carol Marcus’ undressing in particular (even appreciated where her and Kirk’s relationship sits in the history of Trek ): it took me out of the film. It was such a jarring inclusion, that you’re out of the story for a minute, while the letters WTF go across your mind.

To be clear: if Alice Eve wants to stand around in her underwear, then fair enough. The world is far more interested in seeing her in her pants than it is me in mine, and that’s a status quo I have no desire to challenge. If it fits the film, as it did in the quietly impressive Starter For Ten, then it’s not really much of a grumble. That’s what, ultimately, differentiates Star Trek Into Darkness from Iron Man 3 and Oblivion here. In the latter two films, you don’t go out of the story, no matter if you feel the flesh there was gratuitous or not. In Star Trek Into Darkness, you do. I’m pretty certain, by the debate that’s raging online, that I’m not the only one to feel this way. 

Of course, in the last Star Trek movie, it was Zoe Saldana’s turn to undress, in her case to her bra, but again, there was a sense it was at least something to do with something. With Carol Marcus, can you say the same thing?

I was interested to read, then, an interview that Alice Eve gave to StarTrek.com, where she was asked about whether her character’s impromptu underwear moment was gratuitous. And she does touch on the issue of double standards.

“There is sexuality throughout the movie”, she said. “Chris (Pine) comes in in a very skin-tight suit and you… can see him. He has his top off at the beginning. Benedict (Cumberbatch) did a shower scene that wasn’t in the movie. I think that to ignore an element of sexuality is to ignore an element of humanity”, she argued.

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This is a bit unfair on Alice Eve, as there’s a sporting chance that her comments aren’t quite in the right context for this piece. But no matter how many times I read them, it doesn’t really sound like much of a defence. Appreciating I didn’t really notice Chris Pine’s penis at any point in the film (crikey, that phrase alone will do the search traffic into the site no harm), it was hardly Gene Roddenberry’s thing to send his crew off to the Marks And Sparks lingerie department (although, to be fair, skimpy outfits were not in short supply). In the new films, I’m not sure I walked away from either thinking sexuality was a major theme. Appreciating Eve’s argument that sexuality is a part of humanity, it still doesn’t seem like an answer to the particular question here.

And the question is this: did the (male) creative team of Star Trek Into Darkness strip Alice Eve down for the good of the story, or the good of the promotion of the movie? I’d like to say the former, as each of them has real pedigree in shepherding quality female roles. Unfortunately, whatever their intentions, it simply feels – and I accept lots of people disagree with this – more like the latter.

That said, if that Benedict Cumberbatch shower scene ends up a deleted scene on the DVD, expect Alice Eve’s smalls to find themselves relegated down the Google rankings a little…

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Simon Brew

Simon Brew | @SimonBrew

Editor, author, writer, broadcaster, Costner fanatic. Now runs Film Stories Magazine.

Star Trek Into Darkness writer Damon Lindelof apologizes for 'gratuitous' Alice Eve underwear scene

Though Lindelof notes that Carol's counterpart, Captain Kirk, is also shown nearly naked in this film and its predecessor, critics say the difference in the scenes is this one's lack of context

Article content

Set phasers to ‘oops’: Damon Lindelof, the screenwriter behind Star Trek: Into Darkness , is apologizing for a scene in the film in which actress Alice Eve strips down to her underwear — for no apparent reason.

The Lost co-creator took to Twitter on Monday, saying he has “copped” to the fact that they could have done better, and all but asking for someone to beam him out of this black hole of criticism.

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https://twitter.com/DamonLindelof/status/336606133055811584

https://twitter.com/DamonLindelof/status/336606537403482112

https://twitter.com/DamonLindelof/status/336606936915144704

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The scene in question shows Carol Marcus (played by Alice Eve) in private with Captain Kirk (Chris Pine). She asks Kirk to turn away as she undresses. Instead, in very Kirk-like fashion, he watches until the actress appears nearly naked in her underwear. Some questioned why she had to undress at all. Does Carol simply have poor social skills?

First sparking attention upon the release of the full-length trailer , the scene has continued to receive negative reaction from some calling it “gratuitous.” For one blogger, the scene emphasized the throwaway quality of Eve’s character.

“I won’t go into Dr. Carol Marcus all that much but suffice to say, her purpose in the film was minimal and they made her stand around in underwear for absolutely no reason,” wrote The Mary Sue contributor Jill Pantozzi in a blog review . “We didn’t even see an actual display of the intelligence she was touted to have.”

Lindelof and director J.J. Abrams may want to brush up on Laura Mulvey’s concept of the “ male gaze ” if the controversy goes any further. While it doesn’t feature Abrams’ camera lingering over Eve’s curves and sweeping up and down her nearly-naked body, the scene represents a long-standing tradition in the sci-fi and fantasy genre that it appears many wish was broken.

The popular HBO drama Game of Thrones faces much of the same criticism. In a recent episode review online , A.V. Club critic Todd VanDerWerff noted the show’s imbalance of nudity, writing that “there have been several times as many naked women on whom the camera lingers as any two-second glimpse of a naked man.”

Though Lindelof notes that Carol’s counterpart, Captain Kirk, is also shown nearly naked in this film and its predecessor, critics say the difference in the scenes is this one’s lack of context.

But what does the actress have to say?

Eve spoke with the New York Daily News at the film’s London premiere, defending the director and screenwriter’s film choices, some of which the actress considers somewhat subversive in terms of gender stereotypes.

“I think the nature of what we do is visual and so all of us are subject to typecasting,” she said. “I think J.J. Abrams very carefully and decidedly walks the line between allowing audiences to have what they expect from cinema, which is to have these paradigms but also to try to slightly adjust tired stereotypes.

“So he gives us strength. And he does it for men, too. There’s vulnerability in all humanity and that vulnerability doesn’t just belong to women.“

Eve noted jokingly “every man in this movie cries.”

What do you think of the scene? See the trailer below.

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Deleted Scene from STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS Features Benedict Cumberbatch Showering

Benedict Cumberbatch showers in a deleted scene from Star Trek Into Darkness. A deleted scene of Benedict Cumberbatch showering in Star Trek 2.

There's been some controversy over a scene in Star Trek Into Darkness where Carol Marcus ( Alice Eve ) strips down to her underwear on screen for no reason.  Director J.J. Abrams recently went on Conan to explain his decision by saying that it was intended as a moment of levity in an action-packed scene.  He also said that we see Kirk ( Chris Pine ) naked from the waist up post-threesome with some alien babes.  Abrams doesn't seem to quite get it that both scenes objectify women, but in terms of eye candy, Eve and Pine are both very attractive people.  However, if you want some more partial nudity, it turns out there was a deleted scene of Benedict Cumberbatch showering, and thus creating today's most searched phrase on Google.  This is a real scene, not one made up by Conan .

Hit the jump to check out Cumberbatch's "evil shower".

Via Conan .

Star Trek: Alice Eve Confused by Backlash Over Into Darkness' Underwear Scene

Alice Eve defends her controversial underwear scene in 2013’s Star Trek Into Darkness, saying she was confused by the backlash it caused.

Alice Eve admitted she was confused by the backlash over her controversial underwear scene in 2013’s Star Trek Into Darkness .

"It was something I voluntarily worked with a trainer to be fit for, was very much prepared for, and very much enjoyed [doing] -- filming, executing, promoting," Eve told Inverse . "The feeling I shouldn't have done it, or that it was exploitation, was confusing to me. There are many things in the world that are confusing. I put it down to one of those anomalies. I'm proud of that scene, and all the work I did."

RELATED:  Star Trek: Lower Decks Creator Unpacks Season 2's Shocking Finale

The scene in question features Eve's Dr. Carol Marcus stripping down into her bra and underwear in front of Captain Kirk (Chris Pine) as she changes into a jumpsuit and prepares to deactivate a torpedo. Many fans considered the scantily-clad moment to be gratuitous and unnecessary, sexualizing a female character for seemingly no reason. But Eve, who plays a science officer in the film, credited the sci-fi blockbuster with providing her the opportunity to portray a strong female character. "Sci-fi is cool because it shows powerful women," she said. "They're not usually married with kids. They're working for their passion."

Eve previously commented on the controversy at the time of the film's release in 2013. When asked if the issue was being blown out of proportion, she responded, "Yes. I was there, after all. I mean, I was there, so I was part of it."

RELATED: Star Trek Creator Gene Roddenberry Is Getting a Biopic

In an interview on TBS'  Conan back in 2013, director J.J. Abrams explained that the scene was intended to balance an earlier one of Chris Pine shirtless, but admitted that the delivery was executed poorly. "The intent was: it's Kirk, who was always sort of this womanizing character. So the idea was, have a beat like that in the midst of all this action and adventure," Abrams told host Conan O'Brien. "I don't think I quite edited the scene in the right way. To me, it was kind of a balance... I can also see [the critics'] point of view."

Earlier this year, Paramount Picture scheduled an untitled Star Trek sequel for June 9, 2023. It's not yet clear if the cast from the three previous rebooted films will return, but Abrams remains on board as a producer. Matt Shakman, the director behind Marvel's Disney+ series WandaVision , is slated to helm the latest installment in the sci-fi franchise.

KEEP READING:  George Takei Calls William Shatner 'Unfit' for Spaceflight, Shatner Fires Back

Source: Inverse

Damon Lindelof responds to Star Trek Into Darkness 'underwear scene' criticism

“We should have done a better job of not being gratuitous”

Star Trek Into Darkness co-writer Damon Lindelof has taken to Twitter to respond to the misogyny claims that have surrounded the now infamous underwear scene. Featuring prominently in the trailer, the scene - in which Kirk gawps at Alice Eve’s Carol Marcus as she’s changing into her bomb disposal gear - has drawn criticism for for being gratuitous, or even sexist. Writer Lindelof responded on Twitter with a series of even-handed comments:

I copped to the fact that we should have done a better job of not being gratuitous in our representation of a barely clothed actress. May 20, 2013
We also had Kirk shirtless in underpants in both movies.Do not want to make light of something that some construe as mysogenistic. May 20, 2013
What I'm saying is I hear you, I take responsibility and will be more mindful in the future. May 20, 2013
Also, I need to learn how to spell "misogynistic." May 20, 2013

Star Trek Into Darkness is currently in cinemas worldwide.

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Star Trek Into Darkness' Alice Eve Is Proud Of Her NSFW Scene (Despite Backlash)

Dr. Carol Marcus speaking

"Star Trek Into Darkness" may not be the most heavily regarded of the franchise, but there are some moments that stand out in the public consciousness (for better and worse). The first is the ham-fisted attempt to get audiences to believe that Benedict Cumberbatch was playing anyone else other than Khan in the lead-up to the film's release, and of course, that's precisely who he was . The other thing people might remember is a gratuitous scene where Captain Kirk (Chris Pine) sneaks a glimpse of Dr. Carol Marcus (Alice Eve) in her underwear. 

A backlash soon followed, with people claiming the scene served no narrative purpose other than objectifying a woman. The film's writer, Damon Lindelof, apologized to fans on Twitter: "I copped to the fact that we should have done a better job of not being gratuitous in our representation of a barely clothed actress." It's a shame that one scene is what most people take away from the role because Dr. Carol Marcus is an otherwise great character and a valuable member of the team.

One person who didn't see what all the fuss was about was actress Alice Eve. Years after "Star Trek Into Darkness" came out, she said how she was fine with doing the scene in the first place. 

Alice Eve is 'proud of that scene'

While the "Star Trek Into Darkness" scene in question could be called "unnecessary" or "gratuitous," Alice Eve didn't really see what the big deal was. Years after the film came out, she looked back on it and told Inverse , "It was something I voluntarily worked with a trainer to be fit for, was very much prepared for, and very much enjoyed [doing] — filming, executing, promoting." It shouldn't have come as any surprise. That moment was likely in the script, so Eve probably knew what she was signing up for, which is why she worked with a trainer to look her best. 

The backlash that followed also confused her, adding, "The feeling I shouldn't have done it, or that it was exploitation, was confusing to me." An argument could be made either way — both that the scene was made through the male gaze but that Alice Eve was in control and was a willing participant to show off her body. At the end of the day, it was just one of those things for the actress, "There are many things in the world that are confusing. I put it down to one of those anomalies. I'm proud of that scene, and all the work I did."

Eve would continue pursuing intriguing projects, including another science-fiction film, "Warning." That movie doesn't give in nearly as much to the male gaze, and "Star Trek" fans should seek it out to see Eve in another context.

It was actually a completely different scene in Star Trek Into Darkness that got cut

The discourse around Alice Eve's scene in "Star Trek Into Darkness" has numerous facets to it. Not the least of which is that Chris Pine, who is also insanely attractive, can also be found shirtless throughout the franchise. However, one could make the argument that that's actually part of his character, seeing how he's a womanizer. Dr. Carol Marcus, on the other hand, is pretty much all business from the start, so the insinuation that she would strip with Kirk in the vicinity may come across as odd to some. 

The fact this conversation continues raging a decade after the film came out suggests there are many intersectional components to the scene with a myriad of viewpoints, many of which have valid reasonings. And all of this could've been avoided had the scene been nixed in the first place. After all, it wouldn't have been out of the question, seeing how Eve told other outlets about another scene that was left on the cutting room floor.

Eve admitted one scene that got cut that sounded rather superfluous, "There was only one scene that I did that didn't make it in. It's a scene where I explain why I have an English accent, but I don't think it was my favorite scene." Suffice it to say, if "Star Trek 4"  ever gets off the ground, expect them to be very careful about who they depict in underwear.

Outside the Beltway

Lame defense of carol marcus underwear scene.

Steven L. Taylor · Saturday, September 14, 2013 · 26 comments

Speaking to 1701 News , Roberto Orci (one of the authors of Star Trek into Darkness ) offered the following on the scene of Carol Marcus changing her clothes in the movie (a scene that had a rather prominent place in the movie’s commercials):

Orci also knows that some fans had issues with Carol Marcus, played by Alice Eve, disrobing for what appeared to be practically no reason at all. Lindelof has taken the blame for that scene, but Orci says the true fault of that scene actually lies with someone completely different: J.J. Abrams. "Originally, they were going to open the torpedo in orbit, in space, so originally we had Kirk chasing her into a room where she was changing into a space suit," Orci said. "So it seemed more purposeful when we originally conceived it." However, because of production costs, they decided to open the torpedo on land instead. And while Marcus does wear a different outfit, Orci does understand fans who say she didn’t need to really change — and certainly didn’t need to do it in front of Kirk. "I can’t claim to be an expert on feminism, but I can point out that you can see Kirk half-naked as well, in both movies," Orci said of Chris Pine. "He’s in his underwear, so is Uhura. "Did the movie need that scene? No. Was Alice Even a good sport? Awesome." Orci says he remains torn about how feminism is perceived today. "You can’t watch Miley Cyrus on the VMAs and not be confused about the state of feminism."’

Ah yes, the confusing nature of feminism with a side helping of the Miley Cyrus Defense,

I think I would prefer that they just admit that a) Alice Eve is an attractive lady in really good shape, and that b) showing attractive ladies in really good shape in their underwear appeals rather heavily to the main demographic likely to purchase tickets to Star Trek films.

Although I will give them credit for the amusing pretzel logic.

Such scenes, btw, are hardly unusual or especially noteworthy, but this one really did feel shoehorned in (a feeling reinforced by its aforementioned prominence in the commercial).  The ongoing silly attempts to explain it only reinforce that impression.

Steven L. Taylor

About Steven L. Taylor

' src=

Why is Orci being questioned about the Marcus scene, but not about similar scenes featuring Kirk that appeared in both of the recent Trek movies?

' src=

Ok now I really want to see this movie :-).

' src=

@ Doug Mataconis : He does mention Kirk in the response, but seriously: is there a similar image of Chris Pine blocked the way the Eve shot was blocked and that was used in the commercial?

But it really isn’t that, to me, it is the lame attempts to pretend that the scene was anything other than what it was.

@ Steven L. Taylor :

The shots of Kirk in Star Trek and Into Darkness were just as gratuitous, though and I don’t recall anyone asking Orci or Abrams to justify those.

Yea, the response is kind of lame, but the question is even lamer.

@ Doug Mataconis : Which Kirk scene would you consider to be analogous?

I believe the one in Uhura’s quarters in the first movie comes to mind.

@ Doug Mataconis : I don’t recall an isolation shot of shirtless Kirk in that shot that was designed for the clear purpose of just showing off his bod.

And that scene was at least intended to be a character scene to show Kirk as a bit of a cad. What was the character purpose of the Marcus scene?

(also: was the Kirk scene in question used as a major part of the advertising for the film?)

' src=

The entire movie was disappointing. Brining Kahn back once was slick. A second time was snooze inducing.

Character purpose? Let’s be honest here, this is Trek, not Shakespeare. As for the rest of the question, sex sells.

Like I said Orci’s response is kind of lame but I thought this was kind of a dumb thing for people to obsess over when the question first came up during the summer

' src=

Alice Eve is an attractive lady in really good shape, and that b) showing attractive ladies in really good shape in their underwear appeals rather heavily to the main demographic likely to purchase tickets to Star Trek films.

And to a fair proportion of the OTB demographic, I suspect. What’s the point to this story without a still from the scene? 😉

@ Doug Mataconis : Yes, but the whole point of the post was that Orci’s response was lame.

However, are you really going to tell me that of all the scenes of this nature that one can conjure, that this wasn’t one of the silliest? Changing clothes in a shuttlecraft and then taking a full body, lingering shot in her underwear. The reason people ask is not because they are prudes, it is because of the obvious and clumsy nature of the shot. Surely you can see that point?

I am not arguing, to be clear, that I am outraged by the scene or that I would have asked about it had I interviewed anyone involved with the movie. However, every time it is brought up, the answers are sillier than the questions.

' src=

When paintings were the dominant form of visual expression, artists made paintings of attractive naked people. Because we — particularly men — like to look at them.

And one of the pleasures of the movies is seeing attractive naked people. Mostly women, because men seem to like to look more than women… and because men control most of the entertainment industry.

This reminds me of Michael Medved whining that Gwyneth Paltrow’s nudity ruined Shakespeare in Love and how the movie could have worked just fine without it. To which you could respond that her being naked adds a level of honesty and realism to the love scene… but then you’re arguing on his terms. Gwyneth Paltrow is a lovely woman who at that time had a beautiful body, and many people enjoyed looking at her. It was a type of visual pleasure that matched the verbal pleasure of Stoppard’s dialogue.

And if Orci should be apologizing for anything, it’s the way he, the co-writers and Abrams strip-mined the most emotional moments from Wrath of Khan and, by taking them out of context, emptied them of all emotion. At least the quick shot of the actress in her underwear offered clean, honest pleasure. The script made me want to take a shower.

' src=

Everyone should have a chance to decide…

http://img2.timeinc.net/ew/i/2013/05/22/Alice-Eve.jpg

1) It added nothing to the story,

2) Who cares, it’s still Star Trek.

' src=

“Gratuitous” = $$$

' src=

Not to cause anyone to have an aneurism, but sex sells. It is used universally to sell everything from A to Z. Remember those car ads in the days of old?

@ Donald Sensing : @ OldmanRick : Indeed. I am not disputing that, not in the least.

' src=

I thought they had already used the lamest excuse possible on this scene.

I was wrong. The excuses just keep getting dumber. It’s like they really want the scene to be about something other than what it actually is. Like that might make it better?

' src=

@ anjin-san : Brining Kahn back once was slick. A second time was snooze inducing.

Goddamn Spoiler!..or am I the last one to find out?

' src=

@ Ernieyeball :

am I the last one to find out?

Probably. It came out before the movie did. If it was supposed to be a secret, it was very poorly kept.

As far as Alice Eve in her undies, who cares why? It’s Alice Eve in her undies!

' src=

Dear Alice has bared a lot more in most of her other movies and she not even in particularly revealing undies – looks more like a bathing suit.

@ Ernieyeball

I have been watching Star Trek since 1966. Loved the last movie, but this one was a total waste of time and money. The Trek franchise is now kind of where Bond was after “Quantum of Solace” – they revitalized the franchise, then had a serious sophomore slump. The next one needs to be good.

' src=

@ anjin-san : My personal dream for the next film: James Spader as Harcourt Fenton Mudd. Mudd’s inept dealings put the galaxy on the brink of war. Make it camp and comedic, like ST IV was.

' src=

The first 3/4 of the first reboot movie was great. The first 3/4 of the second was good. The last quarter of both were terrible. I realize that sci fi physics are at play, but Abrams carries that so far towards the end of both movies that it completely took me out of the movie. I was chuckling at the ridiculousness of the scenes rather than being at all invested in the outcome.

' src=

I’d rather hear an explanation why McCoy needed Khan returned to the ship, when he had 72 superhumans on ice with the necessary magic blood.

@ Anderson : or why Khan’s magic blood lost it’s power at the instant of his death

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carol marcus star trek underwear scene

Alice Eve Isn’t Ashamed Of Her Controversial Star Trek Scene

Alice Eve Star Trek

Alice Eve believes she has a right to bear arms — and the rest of her, too!

The actress was one of the stars of 2013’s Star Trek: Into Darkness. In the film, Eve had a surprising and revealing scene in which she changed clothes with the rest of the crew still nearby.

Well, Alice has since revealed her opinion about the scene and the backlash it caused. We’ll break down everything you need to know about the scene and why Alice Eve wasn’t in 2016’s Star Trek Beyond.

Alice Eve plays Doctor Carol Marcus in Star Trek: Into Darkness. Marcus is a Starfleet science officer serving aboard the USS Enterprise. The character has a doctorate in applied physics and she specializes in advanced weaponry. But the good doctor shows off a whole lot more than just her smarts in the film.

Alice Eve Star Trek

In the scene , it’s revealed that Dr. Carol Marcus concealed her true identity to board the ship. Spock informs Captain Kirk that she is a weapons specialist who might be able to help them “torpedo” their current weapons problem.

In a rapid tonal shift, Marcus starts to change out of her clothes in front of Captain Kirk. She asks him to turn around, but she doesn’t seem too concerned with her privacy. The story reason for this change seems to be to prepare herself for a trip through space. But the moment seems forced and many feminist critics believe that the scene sexualizes her character and is a form of lazy misogyny.

Alice Eve doesn’t feel any shame about the underwear scene. In fact, she’s proud of the hard work she put in to achieve the body needed for that scene. She also expressed being confused by the backlash and showed no regrets for her participation.

In an interview with Inverse , the actress explained that she was a very willing participant in every part of the process:

“It was something I voluntarily worked with a trainer to be fit for, was very much prepared for, and very much enjoyed [doing] — filming, executing, promoting…there are many things in the world that are confusing. I put it down to one of those anomalies. I’m proud of that scene, and all the work I did.”

But did Eve’s hot take on the hot scene cost her a job?

Why was she not in Star Trek Beyond?

Alice Eve was not in 2016’s Star Trek Beyond and fans were quick to speculate about the reason. But it turns out that the controversial scene and Eve’s response had nothing to do with her being left out of the third installment. Co-star and screenwriter Simon Pegg broke down the real reason:

"We thought rather than have Carol Marcus be not used to a reasonable capacity, let’s just not include her, have her be alive, in canon, and be ready to come back at any time." – Simon Pegg

It turns out that this isn’t Eden and you can’t blame Eve for everything.

We likely won’t see the star trekking anytime soon as the fourth installment of the series is currently stuck in production hell. As the cast moves on to other projects, it might be time for the “next generation” of Star Trek films.

Until then, live long and prosper.

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Memory Alpha

Carol Marcus

  • View history

Doctor Carol Marcus was a female Human who was one of the leading scientists in the Federation . She was once romantically involved with Starfleet officer James T. Kirk – a relationship from which she bore a son, David Marcus – but she opted to devote her life to her research and to raising David.

  • 1.1 Relationship with James T. Kirk
  • 3 Memorable quotes
  • 4.1 Appearances
  • 4.2.1 Conception
  • 4.2.2 Casting
  • 4.2.3 Aftermath
  • 4.3 Apocrypha
  • 4.4 External links

Early life [ ]

Carol Marcus was born to Alexander Marcus , a Starfleet officer , and a woman with the maiden name Wallace . ( Star Trek Into Darkness )

Relationship with James T. Kirk [ ]

It was during the late 2250s when Carol Marcus became involved with James T. Kirk, at the time a junior Starfleet officer. In 2259 , she was stationed at Starbase 1 , while Kirk was the first officer of the USS Farragut . Although their long-distance, off-and-on-again relationship was described as "complicated", Carol eventually became pregnant with Kirk's son, David. ( SNW : " Subspace Rhapsody ")

Carol felt that she and Kirk had no basis for a lasting relationship, with Kirk traveling around the universe while she worked in a lab , so she asked that Kirk leave her alone to raise the boy. That they both cared more for their careers than they did for each other was never disputed. As Carol saw it, she and Kirk lived in entirely different worlds, and she wanted her son to be raised in hers. ( Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan )

Project Genesis [ ]

Carol Marcus uniform

Marcus wearing her work uniform

Carol continued with her work, enjoying much success. In 2284 , she proposed the most ambitious and potentially dangerous of her plans to the Federation, dubbed " Project Genesis ". Once her proposal was accepted for Federation funding, she began a three-stage development process aboard the station Regula I , accompanied by a highly skilled team of scientists which included her son, Dr. David Marcus.

She and her team made remarkable progress and, by 2285 , they were ready to try out their new invention. However, before they could find a suitable planet on which to test the Genesis Device , Khan Noonien Singh and his band of " supermen " intervened, bringing Kirk back into her and David's life.

Though she didn't share her son's mistrust of Starfleet, Carol was incensed when told that her project and all her files were to be taken by the crew of the USS Reliant , under orders of the new Admiral Kirk. She was determined to fight this unexpected incursion into her territory, though she was willing to give her former lover the benefit of the doubt. When it turned out to be Khan, not Kirk, who stole the Genesis Device, she gratefully accepted Kirk's assistance. When Khan came to the lab, she led a few of her team down into the Genesis cave in Regula to hide the Genesis Device from him. Kirk found and rescued her.

McCoy Marcus Kirk

Carol Marcus with Admiral Kirk and Doctor McCoy , proudly observing the newly formed Genesis Planet

Throughout the quest to save the device from Khan's evil plans, it was apparent that, although Carol Marcus still felt affection for Kirk, her true love was her work. Even as havoc was erupting all around, she gazed on the glory of the Genesis Planet forming exactly as her specifications and years of research had indicated it would. The Genesis Project appeared to be a success, and her pride in her work was unmistakable.

The encounter with Khan gave Carol the opportunity to reunite David with his father. ( Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan ) When her son was later killed by Klingons on the Genesis Planet, Carol was left with her projects and her research, the life that had sustained her for many years. ( Star Trek III: The Search for Spock )

Almost a century later, in 2374 , Captain Kathryn Janeway referred to Dr. Marcus in her captain's log when Janeway was in search of the omega molecule and found herself having to face enforcing the Omega Directive .

In her log, she noted that, in spite of her apprehensiveness, she now knew how Carol Marcus must have felt when she developed the Genesis Device, watching helplessly as science took a destructive course. Janeway, however, noted that, unlike Marcus, she had at least a chance to prevent it from happening. ( VOY : " The Omega Directive ")

Memorable quotes [ ]

" Every time we have dealings with Starfleet, I get nervous. We are dealing with something that… could be perverted into a dreadful weapon. Remember that overgrown Boy Scout you used to hang around with? That's exactly the kind of man… " " Listen, kiddo, Jim Kirk was many things, but he was never a Boy Scout! "

" Starfleet has kept the peace for over a hundred years. I cannot, and will not, subscribe to your interpretations of this event! "

" Mother, he killed everybody we left behind! " " Of course he didn't. David, you're just making this harder. " " I'm afraid it's even harder than you think, doctor. Please… don't move. "

" You had your world… and I had mine. And I wanted him in mine… not chasing through the universe with his father. "

" Actually, he's a lot like you. In many ways. "

Appendices [ ]

Appearances [ ].

  • Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan
  • Star Trek III: The Search for Spock (archive footage)

Background information [ ]

Conception [ ].

The notion that gradually transformed into the character of Carol Marcus was incorporated into the plot for Star Trek II as early as the first story treatment written for that film. In this one-page story outline (written by Executive Producer Harve Bennett ), Admiral Kirk personally responded to news of a colonial rebellion on a Federation planet specifically because his former relationship with this unnamed woman personally connected him to a leader of the revolution, their son. The plot, in this earliest of its forms, also involved Kirk rescuing the woman from a drifting spacecraft, bringing her aboard the Enterprise , before proceeding to the planet. ( The Making of Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan , pp. 35-36)

The character of Kirk's former lover then received the name Diana, in a nineteen-page outline that Jack B. Sowards went on to develop from Bennett's single-page treatment. She was again rescued by the Enterprise from a refugee ship that originated at the planet undergoing revolution, this time named as Omega Minori IV. However, it was established that she had never informed Kirk of the fact that, as a result of their prior relationship, she now had a son, a fact Kirk nevertheless learned during the course of the adventure. ( The Making of Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan , pp. 37-39)

Subsequent early drafts of Star Trek II featured Dr. Janet Wallace from " The Deadly Years " in the role of Kirk's old flame. Near the start of the next story outline, she sent a personal call to Kirk while both were on Earth, saying that she could use a visit from an old friend. Wallace thereafter intermittently told Kirk and their son that they were related to one another, easing tensions between them. She also traveled to Omega Minori IV herself, shortly before her revelation to David that Kirk was his father. ( The Making of Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan , pp. 39-42) This version of the character remained much the same in the film's first script draft, written by Jack Sowards. She was again reduced to hiding in caves with David and the other rebels but also had some significant interplay with Kirk. ( The Making of Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan , p. 45)

In an updated script draft which Sowards submitted, the role that Janet Wallace fulfilled in the story had been replaced with a new character named Carol Baxter. ( Star Trek: The Magazine  Volume 3, Issue 5 ; [1] ) While still to undergo some degree of final revision, the character was by now much as it is in the film's final version. ( The Making of Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan , pp. 37-39)

The filming script for Star Trek II describes Carol Marcus as being "in her early forties, attractive and intelligent." The same script draft also states that, at the time she recorded the visual footage in which she proposed Project Genesis , she was "not used to" appearing on-camera. [2]

It has been suggested (such as in the Star Trek Chronology , 1st ed., p. 151 & 2nd ed., p. 268) that a "little blonde lab technician" mentioned in " Where No Man Has Gone Before " may, in fact, have been Carol Marcus. As depicted in the episode, Kirk almost married this woman, after an initial encounter between them was arranged by Gary Mitchell (unbeknownst to Kirk) while Kirk was his instructor at Starfleet Academy . Of course, this unnamed character also could have been Janet Wallace or some other woman never shown on-screen. Although Michael and Denise Okuda (the writers of the Star Trek Chronology ) recognize that the reference might actually be to Carol, they also consider that, given the amount of romantic relationships that Kirk had in his lifetime, it is not surprising that Carol was never heard of (at least not directly) before appearing in Star Trek II . ( text commentary , Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan  The Director's Edition )

Casting [ ]

Upon seeking a suitable actress to play Carol Marcus, Director Nicholas Meyer had two precise goals in mind. He later explained, " I wanted a woman who was beautiful and looked like she could think; a woman who was attractive enough that you could see why Kirk would fall for her, and at the same time somebody who could keep up with him. " ( Star Trek: The Magazine  Volume 3, Issue 5 ; [3] ) Meyer also said of the role, " I felt that, if it was to be any kind of meaningful or long-lasting or memorable relationship, she had to have more than just looks. She had to be intelligent. " ( audio commentary , Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan  The Director's Edition / Blu-ray )

Ultimately, Carol Marcus was played by actress Bibi Besch . Nick Meyer was satisfied with this casting decision, believing that Besch fit both necessities for the role, saying of the performer, " She has a face where you can see all the thoughts flitting back and forth. " ( audio commentary , Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan  The Director's Edition / Blu-ray )

Bibi Besch approached her performance of Carol Marcus on a very basic Human level but also as an acting exercise, attempting to make it as realistic and therefore believable a portrayal as she could. " I tried to make it as Human as possible, " remembered Besch, " rather than trying to fit into something that already was because this character hadn't existed before and I didn't really feel that I had to do that […] It's difficult to play a woman who has had a relationship with someone that everybody knows. So I tried to make it believable for myself. I fantasized about an early affair [between Kirk and Carol Marcus] and why it turned out the way it did. What kind of people we both became, how I got to be where I was, not just as a scientist but as a woman who wouldn't have told Kirk for all those years that he had a son. " ( The Making of the Trek Films , 3rd ed., p. 171)

Bibi Besch struggled, somewhat, with relating to a few aspects of Carol Marcus' persona. " I don't know what it's like to be a scientist or to live in the future, " she mused, " There's no way for me to do any research on that. " Even so, she was able to draw on personal experience, since she had been a single parent while having a career, to better understand the role. In this way, she intended to make the part believable to herself, thereby enabling her to engender a realistic portrayal for viewers. ( Starlog , issue #153, pp. 54 & 55)

The first day on which Bibi Besch portrayed Carol Marcus involved the character arriving on the bridge of the Enterprise and overseeing the forming of the Genesis Planet. All other scenes in which Carol Marcus appears were filmed later. ( text commentary , Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan  The Director's Edition )

Bibi Besch felt that, as written for Star Trek II , the role of Carol Marcus was quite limited, even including the details of her past romance with Kirk. " There was a little bit more about our relationship that didn't end up on the screen. But not much, really. It was sketchy to begin with, " the actress related. " Sometimes, I think of my character as just a lot of exposition–a means of getting to the plotline. I would love to do a future Star Trek with a little more exposition. " ( The Making of the Trek Films , 3rd ed., p. 171)

Besch's costumes from Star Trek II were later sold in the It's A Wrap! sale and auction . [4] [5] [6]

Aftermath [ ]

Carol Marcus was omitted from Star Trek III: The Search for Spock , because Harve Bennett decided not to use her in the story, as a cut-back to that film 's budget. ( Trek: The Unauthorized Story of the Movies , 3rd ed., p. 87) Though Bennett originally included Carol in the story outline for the movie (later saying, " I thought it might be fun to have her relating to David and have something going with Saavik "), he subsequently deemed the character extraneous to the story and had some difficulties with how to logically account for her having known about David Marcus using unstable protomatter in the Project Genesis matrix. Thus, Bennett not only excised Carol from the third film but also imagined that she had no knowledge of her son's use of protomatter in the matrix. ( The Making of the Trek Films , 3rd ed., p. 46) Regarding her inclusion, or lack thereof, Leonard Nimoy expressed that, " I gave it a lot of thought, but wasn't aware of any obligatory scene in which Carol Marcus would have worked. " ( Starlog #106, May 1986 , p. 54)

The exclusion of Carol Marcus from Star Trek III was initially very difficult for Bibi Besch to accept. ( The Making of the Trek Films , 3rd ed., p. 46) She couldn't understand why the character wasn't even in the movie's script when she first read it. ( Starlog #153, April 1990 , p. 55)

According to Harve Bennett, Bibi Besch sent a letter of acceptance to him once she viewed Star Trek III , shortly after its release. Bennett stated about the message, " It said, 'I've seen the picture. Now I understand. You were right. I hope you can find a place for me in one of the other films.' " ( The Making of the Trek Films , 3rd ed., p. 46)

Comments made by Bibi Besch, several years after Star Trek III was released, seem to suggest that she remained or returned to feeling frustrated about not having been in that film. She said, " I feel disappointed that I never got a chance to complete my relationship with Jim Kirk vis-a-vis the death of our son […] It would have been nice to have been able to mourn with the father, Kirk; there was nothing with them together [in the film], and that's too bad. " On the other hand, she did admit to subscribing to one theory about her role's exclusion from the third film, remarking, " My sense about it was that they need to keep Captain Kirk unencumbered in any way […] [because] it's part of the Kirk mythology that he be the Lone Ranger out there, by himself, battling the elements. " ( Starlog #153, April 1990 )

Despite hoping to someday make a return appearance as Carol Marcus and "tie up a few loose ends between Carol and Kirk," Bibi Besch was fundamentally honored to have played the part. She reflected, " I feel like I'm part of this history now, having done this character […] After all this time, [Carol Marcus' popularity] is incredible. " Besch also received many items of merchandise in which the character featured. ( Starlog #153, April 1990 )

Initially, Carol was supposed to appear in Star Trek Generations , but this was changed at Paramount's request, Carol was replaced with Antonia . ( audio commentary , Star Trek Generations (Special Edition) DVD )

Apocrypha [ ]

According to the CD-ROM game Star Trek: 25th Anniversary , Carol Marcus was assigned as the chief of research on a Federation Research Station, Ark-7, near the Romulan Neutral Zone , in 2268 .

Carol Marcus appears in the Star Trek: Vanguard novel series, set shortly before and during the early part of the original series and centered around Starbase 47 , code-named "Vanguard" ( β ). Dr. Marcus was assigned as the civilian chief scientist of the Vault, a top-secret laboratory at Vanguard established following the discovery of the Taurus meta-genome ( β ). The series implies that the research into the meta-genome provided the basis for Project Genesis. Her mirror universe counterpart ( β ) appears in a similar position in The Sorrows of Empire .

In the novelizations of Star Trek III: The Search for Spock and Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home , the relationship between Kirk and Carol breaks down when she discovers Starfleet's intentions to hush up information about Genesis – something Kirk had nothing to do with, as well as the fact that Carol reveals that she and one of her colleagues were in a relationship. She elects instead to pay condolence calls on the families of the Regula One staff that were murdered by Khan. It is during one of these visits that she is informed of David's own slaughter.

At the beginning of the Star Trek VI: The Undiscovered Country novelization, Carol is visiting one of the families again on the Themis colony (presumably over fifteen years after the Genesis incident) when it is attacked by Klingons – presumably General Chang, using the prototype Bird-of-Prey that will later cause the Enterprise crew trouble. Carol is severely injured and on life support, news which affects Kirk deeply; over the years, he and Carol had healed the rift over David's death and became friends again, and they were planning on making a life together after his retirement. For this reason, his hatred of Klingons is even more extreme in the novel than in the movie – not only did they kill his son, they may have also killed his future life partner.

In William Shatner 's novel The Ashes of Eden , Carol and Kirk are initially shown living together in Kirk's San Francisco apartment. However, their relationship seems strained due to Kirk's restlessness regarding his retirement. He ultimately decides to join the Klingon/Romulan hybrid Teilani on a mission to her homeworld, leaving Carol behind.

During the Genesis Wave series, it is revealed that Carol is still alive well into the twenty-fourth century, having been concealed on a distant planet during the Dominion War to prevent her knowledge from falling into the wrong hands. Despite the precautions taken to secure information about the Genesis Project, Carol is captured by a race of sentient plants capable of creating mental illusions, who trick her into creating the "Genesis Wave", a wave of energy that terraforms all planets in its path into something that can be inhabited by this species. However, Carol manages to shake off their illusions during a brief period of illness, and, accompanied by Maltz – the sole Klingon survivor of the original Genesis catastrophe – she destroys the space station that would have launched a second Genesis Wave, both she and Maltz dying in the process.

The Myriad Universes story A Less Perfect Union involved an alternate timeline in which John Frederick Paxton destroyed Starfleet Command and ended the talks for the Coalition of Planets in 2155 , Carol Kirk married Commander James T. Kirk , the first officer of the UESS Enterprise ( β ) , in 2255 . They had a son named David Samuel Kirk , who was born in 2261 .

In 2264 , she and David were killed when their transport vessel, the Galileo ( β ) , was traveling to an interstellar symposium on molecular biology proposed by the Vulcan government. Upon the sight of a Human vessel crossing the border of the Interstellar Coalition ( β ), the ship was destroyed by the Coalition vessel ICV Vanik ( β ) when its Vulcan captain T'Prynn ( β ) claimed that the Human transport was not responding to hails. This led to her husband developing a deep resentment towards Vulcans.

External links [ ]

  • Carol Marcus at Memory Beta , the wiki for licensed Star Trek works
  • Carol Marcus at StarTrek.com
  • Carol Marcus (Star Trek) at Wikipedia
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The Controversy Surrounding Alice Eve's Underwear Scene in Star Trek Into Darkness

The Controversy Surrounding Alice Eve's Underwear Scene in Star Trek Into Darkness

A look into the ongoing debate and controversy surrounding the portrayal of Carol Marcus in Star Trek Into Darkness, and the potential redemption of the character in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds.

  • The Debate Over Carol Marcus' Underwear Scene
  • Alice Eve's Perspective and Fan Reactions
  • Redemption and Reinvention in Star Trek: Strange New Worlds

The Debate Over Carol Marcus' Underwear Scene

The scene featuring Carol Marcus in her underwear in Star Trek Into Darkness , directed by J.J. Abrams , continues to spark debate and controversy over a decade after the film's release. This controversial moment, in which Carol strips down and is ogled by Captain Kirk, has remained a topic of discussion among fans and critics alike. It has raised questions about the portrayal of female characters in the Star Trek franchise and the impact of such scenes on the audience.

Alice Eve as Carol Marcus Star Trek: Into Darkness.

Alice Eve as Carol Marcus Star Trek: Into Darkness.

Following the release of Star Trek Into Darkness in 2013, J.J. Abrams and his team faced criticism and scrutiny over the inclusion of the underwear scene. Co-writer Damon Lindelof even tweeted a tongue-in-cheek 'apology' for the scene, acknowledging the gratuitous and unnecessary nature of Carol's portrayal. The defense offered by the collective of writers, including Alex Kurtzman, attempted to justify the scene but was met with skepticism from many fans who viewed it as a prime example of the male gaze intended to titillate the audience.

Carol Marcus Played By Alice Eve Strips Down In Star Trek Into Darkness

Carol Marcus Played By Alice Eve Strips Down In Star Trek Into Darkness

The controversy surrounding Alice Eve's portrayal of Carol Marcus in her underwear scene reflects larger discussions about the representation of female characters in Hollywood, particularly in the context of the #MeToo movement . The scene has been criticized as an example of the exploitation of a female character and has contributed to the perception that the female characters in J.J. Abrams ' Star Trek movies are not as well-developed as their male counterparts. Consequently, the underwear scene has become the defining aspect of Carol Marcus ' character in the film, overshadowing other potential dimensions of her role.

Alice Eve Carol Marcus Star Trek Into Darkness

Alice Eve Carol Marcus Star Trek Into Darkness

Alice Eve's Perspective and Fan Reactions

In response to the controversy surrounding her underwear scene, Alice Eve , the actress behind the character of Carol Marcus , expressed her confusion over the criticisms and defended her performance. Eve highlighted the effort she put into training for the scene and emphasized her pride in the dedication she brought to the role. Her perspective provides insight into the complexities of portraying female characters in the context of a long-standing franchise like Star Trek.

Carol Marcus Scream

Carol Marcus Scream

On the other hand, some fans and followers of the Star Trek series have offered alternate perspectives on the scene, drawing comparisons to the sexually charged nature of the original Star Trek series created by Gene Roddenberry. They argue that the inclusion of such scenes is consistent with the franchise's history and should be viewed in that context. This perspective raises questions about the evolution of societal norms and the interpretation of past depictions in contemporary media.

Kirk Carol Spock Into Darkness

Kirk Carol Spock Into Darkness

The potential redemption of the character of Carol Marcus is on the horizon with the upcoming series Star Trek: Strange New Worlds . Set in the Prime Star Trek Timeline , the prequel series offers an opportunity to reintroduce Carol Marcus in a manner that moves beyond the controversies of Star Trek Into Darkness. The inclusion of Carol in the narrative of Strange New Worlds holds promise for a reimagined portrayal that focuses on her intellect, contributions, and agency, rather than her sex appeal.

snw_perfectcarolmarcus_othershow

snw_perfectcarolmarcus_othershow

With the possibility of Carol Marcus being introduced in Strange New Worlds, the series has the chance to avoid repeating the mistakes of Star Trek Into Darkness. The potential storyline involving Carol's role as the creator of Project Genesis and her concern for galactic issues presents an opportunity to highlight her genius and her commitment to addressing critical challenges. This fresh interpretation of Carol Marcus in Strange New Worlds has the potential to reshape her character and offer a new perspective on her significance within the Star Trek universe.

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Screen Rant

Why alice eve's carol marcus didn't return for star trek beyond.

Star Trek Beyond was the second sequel to JJ Abrams' reboot but why didn't it bring back Star Trek Into Darkness' Carol Marcus, played by Alice Eve?

Star Trek Beyond   was the second sequel to JJ Abrams' well-received  Star Trek   reboot, but why didn't Alice Eve's Carol Marcus make a return? Abrams enjoyed success with the first two installments in his rebooted franchise, with  Star Trek  earning $386 million worldwide while its sequel  Star Trek Into Darkness   doing even better with a $467 million haul.

Unfortunately for the franchise,  Star Trek Into Darkness   faced a lot of flack for its needless deception as to who its secret villain was (spoiler alert; it was Khan), and Abrams was soon tempted away from the franchise by making a movie set in a galaxy far, far away.  Star Trek Beyond  ended up being a ship with a different captain and Abrams' introduction of classic character Carol Marcus - who first appeared in Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan , played by Bibi Besch - ended up being left behind.

Related: The Complete History of Star Trek

There was a period of uncertainty following the release of  Star Trek Into Darkness  in 2013, and it wasn't until three years later that  Star Trek Beyond arrived. The film wound up being directed by Justin Lin - best known at the time for his work in the  Fast & Furious   franchise - and had a script written by co-star Simon Pegg and Doug Jung. The sequel enjoyed a decent critical response but profits sadly dipped to a figure even lower than the first film's box office. Alice Eve's sort-of love interest Carol Marcus for Captain Kirk in  Star Trek Into Darkness  didn't return for  Star Trek Beyond , probably to the benefit of Alice Eve. She had said in previous interviews she was game for returning , so why didn't the character return?

Carol Marcus' use in  Star Trek Into Darkness had already come under flack in the media for not having much of a purpose in the overall story, as well as for having a needless scene of star Alice Eve in her underwear . The reception to the poor handling of her character wasn't the reason for Marcus' lack of appearance in  Star Trek Beyond , however. Rather, Simon Pegg has gone on record to say that the story - which saw the crew of the Enterprise abandon ship, stranded on a planet by Idris Elba's mysterious villain - didn't have a role or a purpose for Carol Marcus. Pegg stated;

"We thought rather than have Carol Marcus be not used to a reasonable capacity, let’s just not include her, have her be alive, in canon, and be ready to come back at any time."

Rather than overpack an already crowded cast list for  Star Trek Beyond , Pegg opted instead to save Carol Marcus for a potential future installment. Sadly, that hasn't yet come to pass, although Noah Hawley is working on a new  Star Trek   movie. Whether that includes any of the Kelvin Timelines'  cast, Hawley isn't saying. Whatever the future holds for  Star Trek , it's looking unlikely Alice Eve's Carol Marcus will make a return.

Next:  Star Trek 4 Has Some Big Hurdles To Overcome

GameRant

Star Trek: Characters That Just Disappeared

  • Some characters in the Star Trek universe have disappeared without a trace, despite their promising introductions and potential storylines.
  • Characters like Yeoman Janice Rand and Saavik had strong starts but fizzled out, either due to writing decisions or lack of development.
  • Even characters like Charlie X and Sub-Commander T'Rul, who had important roles in certain episodes, vanished completely from the franchise's narrative.

The Star Trek universe has some of the best and most intricate lore in the entertainment business, but they've also been around the longest. In those decades, some memorable characters have joined the voyage to go where no one has gone before, and even with all the exotic settings and exciting storylines, the franchise wouldn't be as successful without them.

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There are so many characters in the lore of Star Trek that many of them disappeared after what seemed like a promising introduction. A few have been popular enough to return in movie cameos or in the various TV shows that also share the IP, but other than that, some characters vanish without a trace into the vast nothingness of the final frontier.

Yeoman Janice Rand

Gone halfway through season one.

  • Last Seen: Star Trek TOS , Season 1, Episode 12, "The Conscience of the King"

Played by Grace Lee Whitney, Janice Rand was originally intended to have a much larger role in the series as a love interest for Kirk. The official reason for writing her character out was always that the writers, producers, and network execs decided against having a love interest for Kirk, but Whitney herself cited a more sinister motive .

The character would appear again decades later in an episode of Voyager , and Whitney has appeared in several movie cameos. However, in these instances, it's unclear whether she's playing Janice Rand or just a random Starfleet employee.

A Strong Start That Fizzled Out

  • Last Seen: Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home

Saavik made a strong start as the acting captain in the Kobayashi Maru scene that started the IP's most notorious movie, Wrath of Khan . She was described as a protegee of Spock, one of the top students at Starfleet Academy, and seemed to represent the next generation of Vulcans working with the Federation.

Star Trek: 7 Important Moments In Vulcan History

Saavik was in three Star Trek movies and was played by two actresses before she vanished without a trace from the franchise. She has a small part in the opening scenes of the fourth Star Trek movie, so perhaps she decided that the spacefaring life was too stressful and decided to retire early on her home planet.

He Literally Disappeared

  • Last Seen: Star Trek TOS , Season 1, Episode 2, "Charlie X."

With the way that the mysterious character of Charlie is introduced, it's as if the writers had more planned for him originally, and the narrative of the lost-and-found child is a common science fiction trope. However, it seems that the plot had something else in mind for Charlie that resulted in him disappearing completely.

As the story unfolds, it turns out that Charlie didn't spend several years in solitude as the only survivor of a crash, but was adopted by an advanced alien race. The powers they gave him enabled him to survive, but alienated him from his fellow human beings, and even though his story ends on a haunting cliffhanger, we've never seen or heard from him again.

A Dropped Thread That Dropped Again

  • Last Seen: Star Trek: Voyager, Season 6, Episode 23, "Fury."

Kes was one of the main characters of Star Trek: Voyager in the show's first two seasons before her initial disappearance at the end of "The Gift." It was strongly hinted at this point that she would return, but when she did after a long wait of almost two whole seasons, it wasn't the happy return that was expected.

Star Trek: 10 Greatest Sacrifices, Ranked

When Kes comes back to Voyager in the episode "Fury," she storms through the ship as a powerful destructive force that must be fought and defeated as opposed to being a benevolent or even friendly visitor. The only reasons given have something to do with a convoluted excuse involving time travel. She leaves at the end of this episode again, and this time, Kes never returns.

Sub-Commander T'Rul

Those secrets weren't that important anyway.

  • Last Seen: Star Trek: Deep Space 9 , "The Search, Part II."

T'Rul, the first Romulan to appear on Deep Space 9 , has an impressive buildup in the two-part episode in which she was a pivotal character with a role that was closely tied to the plot. The details of the storyline appeared at first to suggest that her character would have a lot more involvement with the crew of the USS Defiant .

However, it seems that all that character-building wasn't part of a larger plan after all. Although T'Rul returns to the Alpha Quadrant at the end of the episode "The Search, Part II," she's never mentioned or heard from again. The actor who played T'Rul, Martha Hackett, would return as Seska, a character with a much longer story.

Carol Marcus

Gone not once but twice.

  • Last Seen: Star Trek Into Darkness

Carol Marcus is one of the recurring characters of the Star Trek IP who appears in comics, novels, and other mediums, but she's best known for her movie roles. She and her team (including David, her son), built the Genesis Project , and that plotline lasted for three movies until it was gone.

Star Trek: James T. Kirk's Best Friends, Ranked

There seemed little for Carol Marcus to do without either David or the Genesis Project, which might be why her character faded into oblivion even though it would have made sense for her to appear in The Search For Spock. The character appeared again in the more recent movies set in the Kelvin timeline but seems to have disappeared again for similarly unknown reasons.

Created by Gene Roddenberry

First Film Star Trek: The Motion Picture

First TV Show Star Trek: The Original Series

Creation Year 1966

Star Trek: Characters That Just Disappeared

COMMENTS

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  6. Abrams & Lindelof's Star Trek Into Darkness' Underwear Shot Response

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  7. Damon Lindelof Apologizes for Carol Marcus' Underwear Scene in Star

    Screenwriter Damon Lindelof has tweeted his apology to fans offended by Carol Marcus' underwear scene in Star Trek Into Darkness. Marcus, played by Alice Eve, is the only other major...

  8. Damon Lindelof Admits to 'Gratuitous' 'Star Trek' Strip Scene … and Bad

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  9. Star Trek Into Darkness, Alice Eve, and expensive underwear

    It's been two weeks now since I saw the film, and truthfully, I'm still struggling to wrap my head around Alice Eve's sudden disrobing, to the point where she's left standing in some reasonably...

  10. Alice Eve underwear scene in Star Trek Into Darkness 'gratutious

    The scene in question shows Carol Marcus (played by Alice Eve) in private with Captain Kirk (Chris Pine). She asks Kirk to turn away as she undresses. Instead, in very Kirk-like fashion, he...

  11. Alice Eve on 'Star Trek Into Darkness,' Carol Marcus & That

    Published Sep 13, 2013. Star Trek Into Darkness actress Alice Eve talks with Spinoff Online about portraying Carol Marcus, and the controversy surrounding her now-infamous underwear scene. Alice Eve may be best remembered from Star Trek Into Darkness for stripping to her underwear, but it seems to bother her less than it does the film's critics.

  12. Deleted Scene from STAR TREK INTO DARKNESS Features Benedict ...

    A deleted scene of Benedict Cumberbatch showering in Star Trek 2. There's been some controversy over a scene in Star Trek Into Darkness where Carol Marcus ( Alice Eve) strips down to her underwear ...

  13. Star Trek: Alice Eve Confused by Backlash Over Into Darkness' Underwear

    RELATED: Star Trek: Lower Decks Creator Unpacks Season 2's Shocking Finale The scene in question features Eve's Dr. Carol Marcus stripping down into her bra and underwear in front of Captain Kirk (Chris Pine) as she changes into a jumpsuit and prepares to deactivate a torpedo. Many fans considered the scantily-clad moment to be gratuitous and unnecessary, sexualizing a female character for ...

  14. Damon Lindelof responds to Star Trek Into Darkness 'underwear scene

    Featuring prominently in the trailer, the scene - in which Kirk gawps at Alice Eve's Carol Marcus as she's changing into her bomb disposal gear - has drawn criticism for for being gratuitous ...

  15. Star Trek Into Darkness' Alice Eve Is Proud Of Her NSFW Scene ...

    The other thing people might remember is a gratuitous scene where Captain Kirk (Chris Pine) sneaks a glimpse of Dr. Carol Marcus (Alice Eve) in her underwear. A backlash soon followed, with people ...

  16. Strange New Worlds Will Avoid A Big Star Trek Into Darkness Mistake

    A decade after Star Trek Into Darkness, Strange New Worlds ' producers are well aware of the firestorm Carol Marcus' underwear scene ignited, and it's hard to imagine they would invite the same controversy.

  17. J.J. Abrams' Star Trek Made A Big Change To Carol Marcus & No One Noticed

    J.J. Abrams' Star Trek Into Darkness made a big change to the character of Dr. Carol Marcus that largely went unnoticed and be retconned into Star Trek's Prime timeline. Carol was played by Alice Eve in Star Trek Into Darkness, and the young scientist became the center of controversy thanks to a scene where she stripped to her underwear and was ogled by Captain James T. Kirk (Chris Pine).

  18. Lindelof apologizes for Carol Marcus' Into Darkness underwear scene

    This is Star Trek, people are supposed to be beyond petty embarrassment over their bodies by now. They're professionals in a pseudo-military organisation that admits members of both genders. In the meantime, the movies feature this individual freely attending Starfleet Academy and using her pheromone control abilities to seduce and nearly rape ...

  19. Lame Defense of Carol Marcus Underwear Scene

    Speaking to 1701 News, Roberto Orci (one of the authors of Star Trek into Darkness) offered the following on the scene of Carol Marcus changing her clothes in the movie (a scene that...

  20. Alice Eve Isn't Ashamed Of Her Controversial Star Trek Scene

    We'll break down everything you need to know about the scene and why Alice Eve wasn't in 2016's Star Trek Beyond. Alice Eve plays Doctor Carol Marcus in Star Trek: Into Darkness. Marcus is a Starfleet science officer serving aboard the USS Enterprise. The character has a doctorate in applied physics and she specializes in advanced weaponry.

  21. Strange New Worlds Season 3 Won't Repeat Star Trek Into Darkness' Carol

    Star Trek Into Darkness ignited controversy over Carol Marcus changing out of her uniform after telling Captain James T. Kirk (Chris Pine) to "turn around" and Kirk disobeying and getting an eye full of Carol in her underwear. Critics of the scene point to it being gratuitous eye candy with no bearing on the film's story. J.J. Abrams and his team offered an apology while Alice Eve herself is ...

  22. Carol Marcus

    22285 Doctor Carol Marcus was a female Human who was one of the leading scientists in the Federation. She was once romantically involved with Starfleet officer James T. Kirk - a relationship from which she bore a son, David Marcus - but she opted to devote her life to her research and to raising David. Carol Marcus was born to Alexander Marcus, a Starfleet officer, and a woman with the ...

  23. The Controversy Surrounding Alice Eve's Underwear Scene in Star Trek

    The scene featuring Carol Marcus in her underwear in Star Trek Into Darkness, directed by J.J. Abrams, continues to spark debate and controversy over a decade after the film's release. This controversial moment, in which Carol strips down and is ogled by Captain Kirk, has remained a topic of discussion among fans and critics alike.

  24. Why Alice Eve's Carol Marcus Didn't Return For Star Trek Beyond

    Carol Marcus' use in Star Trek Into Darkness had already come under flack in the media for not having much of a purpose in the overall story, as well as for having a needless scene of star Alice Eve in her underwear. The reception to the poor handling of her character wasn't the reason for Marcus' lack of appearance in Star Trek Beyond, however.

  25. Star Trek: Characters That Just Disappeared

    She has a small part in the opening scenes of the fourth Star Trek movie, ... Carol Marcus is one of the recurring characters of the Star Trek IP who appears in comics, novels, ...