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How To Build A Hog Trap Without Welding

Two Easy Methods On How To Build A Hog Trap Without Welding

Welding hog traps is a huge hassle to hunters. It also might seem unnecessary when there are better alternatives.

These welded traps are also not ideal for moving around and fast setup. It’s better to build a hog trap without any welding for that. We know this is why you are here and we plan to help you out on this.

So, how to build a hog trap without welding?

To build a hog trap without welding, you can use a box or a corral trap. But there’re certain factors that need consideration like placement and baiting factors before you set up your trap. It’s paramount to go through the process methodically.

Well, these were just a preview. There are a lot of other crucial factors that need consideration. We’ll discuss all of it in detail.

So let’s not waste any more time and get right to it!

Table of Contents

Types of Non-Welding Hog Traps

Corral traps, things to consider before building a trap.

Non-welding traps are basically traps that don’t need metal or metal joints being welded together unlike traps for bobcats. Having a welded trap system is very difficult to move around. And hogs don’t stay in the same place. If they understand there’s danger, then they won’t stay there for a second.

The best option for these types of hunting is to use non-welding traps. Those that use wood and steel panels, timber, wires, and nets.

In the case of non-welding traps, there are two types that work the best,

  • Corral Trap

Using these traps, you can easily be moveable and effective.

If you’re interested to broaden your knowledge on the ways of hunting, you can learn through reading various hunting and trapping-related books. We’d like to recommend you some of our favorites.

Now, let’s dive deep into the details about these two traps.

For hog trapping, box traps are very simple and easy to make as they take less time. These box traps are portable hog traps. It’s also cheaper to make and can be dismantled and reassembled in another location with no time.

So the question is, how to build a portable hog trap?

Box traps or portable hog traps are made from wooden panels or timber with a rectangular shape. First, the pieces are laid down and set up. After that, the structure is secured and a trap door is built. Finally, the tripwire is set up. These are made in various sizes depending on the need.

trip wire hog trap

Source: wildpiginfo.com

Materials Used

Box traps are rectangular or square structures made of 2-by-4-inch and 1-by-4-inch or 1-by-6-inch wood fence panels.

How to Build a Box Trap

The most frequent box trap design is four feet wide, eight feet long, and five feet high, with no set-top or bottom. To prevent caught pigs from climbing out of box traps, jump bars or corner covers can be fitted. However, do not completely cover the top of a trap. Otherwise, other feral animals might get trapped

Step 1: Laying Down and Setting Up All the Pieces

First, take the designated design you want to use and place the wood fences on the ground. Then, lay them out according to the design. The typical box trap design is four feet wide, eight feet long, and five feet high, with no set-top or bottom.

Overhead woodwork isn’t needed because the five feet high panels prevent the pigs from jumping out.

Step 2: Secure the Structure 

Using decking screw nails, secure the timbers by overlapping them with each other. We recommend decking screw nails over regular nails as they stay in place and hold on to weight far better. Here are some of our recommended quality decking screw nails.

If you’re using panels then just simply join them and secure them using the screw nails

Step 3: Building the Trap Door

Building the trap door is one of the major tricks to trapping wild hogs . It’s very basic and easy to do.

So, the common question that most ask is How to build a hog trap door?

The hog trap door is built using timber and two heavyweight stones. The stones will add weight. Create the holding mechanism of the door using wood. After that, make a latch to which the door will stay open. When the hog triggers the tripwire, it’ll remove the latch and the door will come down . 

Set the trap door by securing it with a steel T-post opposite the front and back corners and connecting the trap sides to the T-posts with wire.

Step 4: Setting Up a Tripwire

Tripwire is the hog trap door trigger . To set up a tripwire for the trapdoor to engage, you’ll need to decide where to set the wire. It’s best to set it just a meter or two behind the trap door. That’ll ensure the hog will be inside the trap and won’t get hurt by the trap door falling.

trip wire hog trap

Source: dragonsdogma.fandom.com

Set the wire from one side to another. Then create a pulley system using a rope or a hook. Set the wire through the pulley system and to the trap door holding mechanism. This will be the hog trap tripwire design .

Tie down the tripwire with the holding mechanism. And that’ it. To tend to the ropes and wires, you can use small knives. We have some of the top Scandinavian knives sorted for you that are small in size and perfect for the job.

When the hog triggers the tripwire, it’ll pull the trap door and trap the hog inside the box.

That’s how you build a box trap.

Things to Consider While Using a Trap Door

To prevent pigs from jumping over a trap door that does not extend to a height of 5 feet, you must account for the height discrepancy. There are two approaches for that,

  • If the trap door is positioned in between the ends of two livestock panels, as described above. cover the opening above the trap door with a piece of livestock panel or other heavy-duty mesh wire.
  • Simply cut a trap door aperture in the middle of one of the 16-foot livestock panels. Install T-posts on each side of the trap door for further strength, then link the door to the cattle panel and T-posts using heavy-gauge wire.

Include an extra T-post with a height of four feet on each side of the door for added security. The brunt of escape efforts will be focused on either side of the door. 

Fasten the livestock panels to the T-posts using heavy-gauge wire every 1 foot, beginning at ground level. Five per T-post. 

Another alternative for fastening is to utilize U-bolts. You’ll need two to three per T-post.

Pros and Cons

Box traps are easier to build and less expensive than conventional steel traps. Furthermore, because they are collapsible, they take up less space for transportation and storage.

The catch amount per trapping attempt is restricted to a few pigs. The box trap’s hardwood panels have a more restrictive appearance than wire panel traps. Requiring longer-term upkeep. Furthermore, the 8-foot side panels are heavy and can be difficult for a single person to manage.

Corral traps are a popular and effective method of controlling feral hogs. They can catch entire sounders (groups of hogs) in a single capture. The majority of corral traps are constructed of 20-by-5-foot utility panels with 4-by-4-inch square mesh and steel T-posts.

Some corral traps make use of headgates, while others make use of the panels themselves to form a funnel. These can be useful because headgates are often expensive to buy. 

Corral traps take longer to put up, but the potential capture rates are substantially higher.

trip wire hog trap

Source: Agfax.com

Corral traps can be built by fastening 16-foot by 5-foot pre-built welded wire livestock panels to 612-foot steel T-posts with heavy-gauge wire or U-bolts. We prefer U-bolts as they’re sturdier and strengthen the joints.

Three or four 16-foot-by-5-foot panels will yield a trap large enough to catch most sounder groups. You may easily increase the size of the trap by adding more livestock panels.

How to Build a Corral Trap

Now that we’ve gone through the details of the design and essentials, let’s go through the building process.

Step 1: Overlapping the Panels 

Begin by overlapping the livestock panel ends 1 foot. Now, fasten the neighboring ends with nylon zip ties or cable ties to make a circular corral trap. Make sure to leave two-panel ends open for the trap door.

Step 2: Shaping the Corral

Shape the corral by pushing or pulling the linked panels in or out of a circle as you work them together. 

Step 3: Setting Up the Trap Door

Set the trap door in position. Then drive T-posts into the ground right next to and on each side of the trap door once the corral is finished to your liking. You can use a single-catch or multi-catch trap door.

Step 4: Securing the Panels and Trap Door

Using heavy-gauge wire or U-bolts, secure the free panel ends to the trap door frame and T-posts.

Step 5: Grounding the T-Posts

Finish the trap by making your way around the corral and placing a T-post in the ground every 8 feet on the outside of the panels once the trap door is securely in place at the overlapped ends and the middle of each panel.

And that’s how you build a corral trap!

Pros And Cons

The size of the corral can be easily altered by adding or removing cattle panels, allowing the trap to be enlarged to accommodate larger sounders. The open-top lets non-target species escape, and the bigger size of the trap, along with the open appearance of the cattle panels, may appear less frightening to trap-shy pigs.

Corral traps take longer to set up than box or cage traps. The 16-foot cattle panels may need to be chopped in half for shipment, requiring more assembly time and effort, and tree roots in wooded areas can sometimes make driving and pulling T-posts difficult. A T-post puller is an excellent investment.

Before going into the hassle of building a hog trap, you’ll need to consider some factors. These are paramount to gaining the best chance of trapping hogs. Let’s go through them.

Trap Placement

Place traps correctly to increase your chances of success. Place them on or near hog pathways that connect resources like food, cover, and water.

Aerial images can indicate how resources are scattered across the environment, which can help you strategically install traps.

Scout the land for hog signs, such as trails, scats, wallows, hog damage, and rubs, which are patches of mud rubbed on trees, posts, and utility poles. In regions where there are a lot of hogs, they will make obvious pathways.

Getting the Right Bait

Feral hogs are omnivores, meaning they eat both plants and animals, therefore a variety of baits can be employed successfully. Whole corn, cattle cubes, carrion, sour grain, and commercial hog attractant odors are common baits.

The importance of pre-baiting cannot be overstated when it comes to trapping success. If entire corn does not attract wild hogs, try the recipe below.

  • Corn- 150 pounds
  • Sugar – 8 pounds 
  • Yeast – 1 packet 
  • 4 or 5 packets of grape, strawberry, or raspberry flavored gelatin or drink powder

Combine all of the ingredients. Make sure you don’t get the product on your clothes. Ladle the bait into and around the trap, restocking as needed.

There are other types of baits you can use. These are,

  • Corn fermented in beer
  • Bread fermented in water
  • Dry dog food
  • Commercially available baits and scents

If you want to use commercial baits, then we’d like to recommend some of the best ones in the market.

You can purchase these baits and have a good chance of luring the hogs into the trap. They are very effective. 

And that’s all there is to know about this topic!

How do you keep deer out of hog traps?

Use an open top so that if you do catch a deer they can jump out. A strand of barb wire about 2′ to 3′ above the ground and across the trap opening has helped us with fewer deer in the traps

What kind of wire is used for trapping?

The best snare wire for making traps should be between .20 gauge and .24 gauge. This size range is thick enough to hold small animals but thin enough to prevent them from seeing the shiny silver reflection.

Are snares effective?

Snaring is an effective technique to capture animals that cause economic damage and for harvesting furbearers. Snares placed in trails or under fences can successfully capture furbearers. Carefully select sites where snares are set to avoid capturing non-target animals such as deer and dogs.

That’s all about the question of how to build a hog trap without welding? We hope we’ve cleared the doubt and fear about this. It is a daunting task to do. But with all honesty, if you have the materials and some helping hand, you can do it in no time.

A pro tip would be to take help from the local expert. You can ask for help from your hunting friends too.

Let us know in the comments how it went.

Good hunting!

trip wire hog trap

Hog Traps for Feral Hogs

These hog traps are well thought out and well built. they can easily fit into the back of a fleet-side pickup truck yet they can still catch 8 or 10 hogs. they weigh a little less than 200 lbs. so it is very easy for one man to manage them. to move one, simply stand it on an end, back a truck to it, and lower the top part of the trap into the bed of the truck. get off the truck and simply slide the trap into the truck. the bottom of the trap allows the hogs to walk on grass and the trap door is very spaceous as to make the hogs feel more welcome since the opening is the full width of the trap. our traps are built of angle iron and #6 gauge galvanized stockade panels so even if they are lightweight they are tough enough for the largest, wildest hog and they will last a long time. these traps are low enough that they should handle the largest hogs, but the height will discourage deer and cattle from entering them. you don't want to see a deer trapped in a hog trap, they will ram the sides of the trap until they break something - often a bottom jaw please check these traps regularly as there is obviously no water available for whatever you have caught. to avoid catching creatures other than feral hogs - soak your corn in water to sour it and then once it is sour - pour diesel onto the corn. so far as i know feral hogs are the only creatures that will eat that and you will not have problems with raccoons tripping your trap shipping charges can be expensive and it may be worth while to pick up the traps here at the store. please order them in advance of picking them up so that we can be sure your trap will be here when you get here contrary to the design of a lot of traps, it is very simple to move this trap to another area. hogs are very smart but moving the trap will make them more likely to enter or it may encounter a different herd. if there is blood at the present location, you will really want to move your trap because the hogs will avoid that area..

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Top Ten Hog Trapping Mistakes

Top Ten Hog Trapping Mistakes

We examine the top ten hog trapping mistakes to understand why most conventional programs fail to eliminate entire feral pig populations from a property. This article will focus on one strategic Integrated Wild Pig Control ® (IWPC ® ) approach (trapping) for whole-sounder removal. As with any control effort, there are exact methods and technologies which perform better than others.

Hog Trapping Mistakes

Mistake #1 – no measure of success.

Jager Pro Measuring IWPC Success

Mistake #2 – Wrong Definition of Success

The performance standard must be established first because success (or failure) is measured against it. The following is an example. We counted a total of 33 pigs at a bait site prior to building the trap enclosure. All but one sow entered the enclosure within 48 hours after erecting the enclosure. The last four animals to arrive both days were pregnant sows. These four adults could have been missed and educated if a traditional trip wire had been used to trigger the gate. Unfortunately, most landowners consider an 88% (29 of 33) capture rate a success. The reality is any performance standard below the 100% kill or capture rate is inadequate and only makes future control efforts more difficult as the remaining pigs become trap-resistant, breed and replenish the population. Wireless technology allowed us to capture all 33 pigs within 72 hours of building the enclosure.

Wild Pig Fetuses

Mistake #3 – No Reconnaissance

Hog Reconnaissance

Mistake #4 – Wrong Trap Selection

Box Trap

Mistake #5 – Wrong Gate Selection

Narrow Drop Gate

Standard gate sizes are built three feet wide by three feet tall. We do not recommend them because trap-resistant adults only feed to the gate but do not cross the narrow threshold into the trap. Narrow thresholds require excessive time periods to condition pigs to enter and are notorious for only capturing juveniles and a small percentage of adults. Trappers cannot accomplish 100% capture results unless the entire sounder is inside the trap enclosure prior to triggering the gate closed. Narrow gate designs are inefficient products to accomplish the stated performance standard.

Mistake #6 – Wrong Panel Selection

Wrong Trap Panel

Mistake #7 – Wrong Trigger Selection

Root Stick

Mistake #8 – Bait Outside Trap

Feeder Outside Trap

Mistake #9 – Trapping All Year

Trap in Corn Field

Mistake #10 – shooting or Shooting While Trapping

Shooting While Trapping Hogs

Choosing an Efficient Process and Product

MINE Trap with 28 Hogs

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Hog Trap Design

by Billy Higginbotham Professor and Extension Wildlife and Fisheries Specialist Texas AgriLife Extension-TAMU Center at Overton

by Don Neuendorff Research Associate-Texas Agricultural Experiment Station TAMU-Overton

Larger traps represent a better opportunity to catch the most hogs at one time as compared to the smaller box traps that can only hold a few hogs or may be avoided altogether by some “trap-wise” hogs. Do not re-release hogs that are trapped as this just causes problems for other landowners. In fact, it is illegal to capture and re-release hogs without having them screened by a veterinarian for brucellosis and pseudorabies. Contact your local Texas Animal Health Commission for more info on that regulation.

1. Trap design

Using sheep and goat panels (4″ x 4″ squares 5′ high) or similar materials, setup the trap in the area where damage is occurring. The trap should be supported at regular intervals (every 4 feet) by t-posts are other similar material and should not have gaps along the bottom where hogs might escape. This design is still portable as the entire trap can be dis-assembled and moved to another area on a flatbed trailer if no hog activity is detected. Set the trap in a “tear drop” shape where the gate is located in the narrow or funnel area (See pictures). This will help funnel the hogs towards a trailer backed up to the gate for loading. Avoid having “hard” corners in the trap design as hogs will tend to pile into that corner and may go over the top. The area inside the trap does not have to be all short grass. It’s okay to have some brush or grass inside the trap and may help camouflage the trap itself and make the hogs less wary. It is important that the hogs have enough room to move away from you as you approach the trap to prevent them from panicking.

2. Trap doors

Doors can either be saloon doors as pictured or hinged at the top. With either design, the door must be wide enough (32″ to 36″ total opening width) for hogs to pass through without tripping and closing the door when they first enter the trap. In the doors shown, a hinged wooden prop with an eyebolt on the side facing the trigger) is placed between the doors that is attached to the gate frame with springs. They open into the trap but will slam shut due to the springs. It is important to brace the doors at the top and bottom so they cannot be forced open from the inside. A wire is run from the prop to an area of the trap furthest from the door opening. Bait is placed in a hole and the wire is stretched over that hole at ground level. Note the series of t-posts running away from the gate toward the back of the trap. Baling wire is wrapped around each post to form an eye (like on a fishhook) and the guy wire is threaded through each eye as the wire descends away from the gate back to the hole where it reaches ground level. As the hogs root in the hole filled with bait, the wire is stretched and the prop is pulled out from between the gate doors and remains closed due to the springs on each door. Additional hogs can push in, but none can exit.

A single door works the same way, but is hinged along the top and propped open by an “L” placed into the end of a pipe that has been driven into the ground at a distance inside the trap that allows the door to be opened and propped up parallel to the ground. The trip wire is attached to the leg of the “L” that is not placed in the end of the pipe. When it is moved by hogs rooting at the bait hole, it no longer supports the weight of the door and gravity causes the hinged door to swing down and close. Again, more hogs can push in, but the door should completely close behind them. Anything that a hog can get its snout under, through or between represents an opportunity for escape.

Pre-baiting is important to get the hogs used to going into the trap. Start by feeding outside and through the gate opening. Pre-bait at least for a week after hogs have been entering the trap. Once you are ready to set the trap, bait all the way back to the trigger but do not scatter bait directly along the trip wire as this may cause the hogs to trigger the gate before they reach the bait hole and all hogs present may not be captured. Spread the bait back toward the bait hole but not right along the t-posts/guy wire. If hogs will come to shelled corn, that is probably the easiest bait to use. However, if acorns are abundant, trapping success may be limited. Fermented corn and old grease both appeal to the hog’s sense of smell and may be better baits if shelled corn is not productive. Click here for Bait Recipes

4. Strategy

The key to success is having the hogs be able to enter without feeling the presence of the trap around them. In other words, bigger is better! A minimum size is probably 20′ by 30′ in the tear drop shape described. If there is a large group of hogs present, this size should be increased accordingly. The larger the trap area, the further hogs can move away from humans and the less likely they will be to panic and force through, over or under the trap sides. The trap should be checked daily unless both water and shade are available inside the enclosure. The longer the hogs stay in the trap, the more likely they will figure out an escape route! Have several traps setup in the general area where the hogs are working and pre-bait with the gates on all traps locked open. Once sign indicating hog presence is located at one trap, then full baiting can begin to capture the hogs. These traps are portable enough that they can be moved fairly quickly if the hogs shift their movements to another location.

5. Removing hogs from the trap

If hogs are going to be sold to a processor, simply back a trailer up to the trap door, place a cross tie across the gate opening to prevent them from going underneath the trailer and circle wide around to the backside of the trap. The hogs will move away from you and funnel toward the trailer.

6. Other trap designs

Many other trap designs will successfully catch hogs. However, any trap without a top should not have 90° corners since hogs tend to “pile up” in those areas and go out over the top. Maximizing the distance between the gate and the trigger that trips the gate is important in any trap design.

7. Trapping tips

  • Set up multiple traps in multiple locations
  • Pre-bait (with gate locked open) until hogs are regularly entering the trap, then set
  • Place the trap where several trees/shrubs are enclosed to provide screening cover for hogs
  • Share one gate among multiple traps. Install the gate only after hogs respond to pre-baiting
  • Vary your bait selection among your traps and with your neighbor’s traps
  • Use small enough mesh to catch all hogs, even juveniles
  • Do not release trapped hogs
  • Don’t give up! Persistence pays

Pig Brig Hog Trap with Sewn-in Trap Cap

The Pig Brig trap system is easy to use, simple to transport and set up, doesn't require cell service, and is truly multi-catch.

  • Beefy Boar Shield that is abrasion-resistant and treated for UV protection.
  • Easy-open net seam to allow trailering or net placement around vegetation.
  • Net has a dynamic drop strength of over 8,000 ft-lb.

trip wire hog trap

BASE NET WITH BOAR SHIELD A 20-ft diameter base net with a dynamic drop strength of more than 8,000-ft-lbs as well as a vinyl-coated easy pull cable seam that makes opening and closing your trap a piece of cake. The boar shield is a heavy-duty, double wall of net that keeps big boars inside.

HARDWARE KIT This kit includes everything you need to set the net: 2-ft ground anchors, ground anchor driver, anchor stakes, double-hooked cam straps, T-post mounts and zip ties. T-posts are not included. If you use trees, you may not need them.

trip wire hog trap

TRAP CAP (optional) A 2-ft-wide trap cap—that can be clipped or sewn in—covers approximately 30% of the net opening, keeping jumpers where they belong: inside the trap.

This slick addition to the Pig Brig XT Trap System ensures that pigs can't climb out. It attaches to the T-posts, just like the Base Net Trap, and will keep a lid on things until you arrive. It weighs 11 lbs. and packs into a basketball-sized container. Easy to carry and sets up in five minutes, it's a great addition to the Pig Brig Trap System for when pigs fly …or at least when they try to jump the top rope. It comes either sewn-in or clip-on to the Pig Brig XT Trap System or you can add the clip-on version later to the Pig Brig Trap System.

Deer typically do well around the netting. Deer will feed around the trap during the conditioning phase and may even jump in and out to feed. Just make sure once the trap is set to keep all your bait in the center, so animals aren’t feeding against the edge of the net. Occasionally a deer may need to be let out and there is a very small risk of bucks getting their antlers tangled in the netting.

It depends. All netting is treated with inhibitors that protect it from wear and tear, as well as ultraviolet degradation. Environmental conditions, amount of use, and lack of care can cause more rapid deterioration of the material.

We expect the net to last about five years. It’s possible it could be longer, or with heavy use, it could be less time. Replacement accessories are easy to find. If you need other replacements, check our site or give us a call. We can help.

Why Pig Brig® Trap Systems are Your Best Defense.

Pig Brig Trap System

  •  Easy To Transport
  •  One Person Set Up
  •  Trap Anywhere
  •  Catches the Whole Sounder

Trap Caps extend the net towards the center to help keep hogs from going over the top. The Sewn-In Trap Cap comes attached, while the Clip-On can be removed.

Trap Cap StyleSewn-in Trap CapClip-on Trap CapNo Trap Cap$3,000.00

From  $270.77 /mo with  View sample plans

QuantityADD TO CARTSewn-in Trap CapClip-on Trap CapNo Trap Cap

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FOLLOW USCopyright © 2023, Pig Brig® Trap Systems|| Terms of Service || Do not sell my personal information || Privacy & Security Copyright ©2023 Field Engine Wildlife Research and Management LLC. All rights reserved. The "Pig Brig" name, the Pig Brig logo mark, and "It's a life sentence." are protected by trademarks owned by Field Engine Wildlife Research and Management LLC. The Pig Brig trap is covered by U.S. Patent No. 11,185,065, Australia Patent No. 2020264312 and Canadian Patent No. 3,097,705, with other aspects of the Pig Brig trap design patent-pending. Here are patent and trademark detail.Reviews

  • Catching just a few wild pigs at a time does more harm than good. The Pig Brig® Trap System is a continuous-catch trap.
  • Field-tested, field-proven, and designed to take advantage of the pigs’ natural instincts
  • This Pig Brig is the easiest trap to set up and operate — and the most effective at catching the whole sounder.
  • More Info Here

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How to Build a Better Hog Trap

Ron and Tes Jolly | Originally published in GameKeepers: Farming for Wildlife Magazine . To subscribe, click here .

If you are a frequent reader of GameKeepers Magazine, you no doubt have read about our plight dealing with feral hogs . Over the past 12 years, my wife Tes and I have been in a struggle to protect our small farm from an onslaught of these intrusive, invasive beasts. What started as a novelty sighting of a single sow and small pigs in 2004 has turned into an all-out invasion of our land. We have shot hogs at every opportunity. We have built traps and altered our farming practices, but to no avail.

Each year there are more hogs. Our turkey numbers appear to be diminishing. Body weights of mature bucks are down. Rooting damage in fields and timber is widespread and our frustration is at an all-time high.

hogs at bait site

The first step toward real change is realizing what you are doing is not working. Tes and I came to that conclusion after a decade of trying to control feral hogs on our land. The next question was where do we go from here?

During the summer of 2012, Tes and I attended seminars on feral swine control at the Quality Deer Management Association’s National Conference. The expert hosting the first seminar we attended left us thinking we were on track with our efforts to control hogs. In fact, we were probably ahead of the curve. We were already doing almost everything that expert recommended.

Rod Pinkston, founder of Jager Pro, a private company specializing in feral swine control and eradication hosted the next seminar. His presentation was where we first heard the term “total sounder removal.”

By the end of the day Tes and I were confused. One expert said we were on the right track, the other said we were doing it all wrong. Five years later I can positively tell you the man who told us we were doing it wrong was absolutely RIGHT!

In 2016, after years of frustration and failure, we made the decision to change our approach to feral hog control. We were putting in the effort but accomplishing very little. In fact, we were losing.

A New Direction 

bait site camera

In late spring this year, our trail cameras were showing the truth of our situation. Three separate sounders were frequenting our farm on a nightly basis. There were two big sounders raiding the farm to our west and the damage was alarming. There was rooting in every food plot. Water holes were instead wallow sites for hogs. The hardwood drains on both farms were rooted and pilfered. 

In early June, we ordered a Jager Pro™ Trapping System. Dr. Frazier Jones, our neighbor to the west, has the same hog problem and placed an order for two trap setups with one gate to share between them for his farm. Rod Pinkston delivered the equipment and surveyed farms, offering advice and support. At that time we did not realize just how wrong our approach to dealing with hogs had been. We were about to learn.

Pinkston did not appear to be alarmed at the damage on our farms. Instead, he calmly assured us there were better days ahead. He was certain we could turn the tide of the invasion. After he surveyed the sites we had chosen for traps, he instructed us to pre-bait the areas and notify him when hogs regularly visited the feeders.

In less than a week one sounder of a sow and six half grown pigs were hitting the baited site on our farm several times a day. The other sounders were still using the farm but had not zeroed in on the site. Hogs were consistently feeding at both sites on Dr. Jones’ farm. We called Pinkston and on June 23 he returned, ready to guide us in proper trap construction.

At the end of the day three corrals were in place. Each was built to exacting standards that Pinkston insisted be met. Each post, panel and wire had a purpose.

More Than a Trap

If you do a search for “building a hog trap” you will likely find plans that call for T-posts, cattle panels, and a door that is triggered when an animal enters the trap and trips the door. Most of these traps are small with a narrow entry that is not conducive to large numbers of animals making their way into the trap before the gate closes.

The Jager Pro system features a 35 feet diameter corral style trap designed to allow a large number of animals inside where they feel comfortable enough to stay for extended periods of time. It also touts a camera with state-of-art electronics that monitors and transmits photos directly to your computer or smart phone in a text message. The Jager Pro app allows you to make a conscious decision on when to close the trap gate. This is the foundation for “total sounder removal.”

The Jager Pro system features a 35 feet diameter corral style trap designed to allow a large number of animals inside where they feel comfortable enough to stay for extended periods of time. It also touts a camera with state-of-the-art electronics that monitors and transmits photos directly to your computer or smart phone in a text message. The Jager Pro app allows you to make a conscious decision on when to close the trap gate. This is the foundation for “total sounder removal.”

hog trap

“ Trapping hogs is not rocket science,” says Rod Pinkston. “If you put a trap where they want to be and put food in it, they want to eat, you will catch hogs. Problem is, each time you catch three in a group of six you educate the other three. Those hogs are not likely to enter another trap – hogs are extremely smart. Our goal is to catch the entire group.”

“We have spent years developing equipment to accomplish this goal. Our specs called for six panels 18 feet in length and five feet high. Our panels feature narrow openings at the bottom to prevent even the smallest pig from escaping. The panels are overlapped and secured with wire to connect them. The 5-foot heavy-duty panels are laid out into a circle from two T-posts set for the drop gate. The two ends are attached to the T-posts leaving a 92 inch opening for the gate. This opening should face the direction you expect the hogs to come from.” 

“We use seven-foot T-posts to support the panels making sure a post is centered where two panels are joined. Posts are driven on the outside of the trap with knobs facing inward. The remaining posts are evenly spaced around the trap. Posts are driven into the ground until only four inches remain above the panels. We use 12-gauge wire to secure the panels to the posts.”

hog harvest

“The gate opening is eight feet wide and four feet high. Hogs feel comfortable entering the trap because they are not crowded entering or once inside. When the gate drops they are not going to escape.”

Why Bother?

At the end of our day with Pinkston, three traps were in place and ready to receive a gate when the time was right. A “M.I.N.E.” (Manually Initiated Nuisance Elimination) camera was installed to monitor our trap and one of Jones’ traps. A trail camera was set to monitor the third trap site. We were urged to allow the hogs to adjust to entering the trap before installing the gate.

Barry Estes, owner of Alabama Hog Control, is an authorized Jager Pro™ dealer in our area. After our day building traps with Pinkston, I asked Estes to explain the mindset of building traps to such exacting standards.

“The last thing you want to do is educate hogs about traps,” said Estes. “The Jager Pro™ system is designed to allow a landowner to trap large numbers of hogs at one time. This is accomplished by conditioning hogs to a food source. When that is accomplished, the trap is large enough so hogs don’t feel threatened when they enter. Once they get comfortable entering the trap, a human being makes the decision to drop the gate. This prevents animals from tripping the trap and closing the gate before the entire sounder is inside.” 

“Building your trap to the recommended standards is a big part of the success you hope to achieve, but there is more to the madness. Traps should be built where hogs want to be, not where you want to catch them. Try to find a place with level ground that is easily accessible. This allows you to get the equipment in and the hogs out.

“There is an old myth that says once hogs are caught in a trap it is fouled and won’t catch more hogs. That is not true. I have one trap that has caught 19 times in just over 9 months. Those 19 catches have totaled 116 hogs to date, but there are things you need to do to keep your trap effective,” says Estes.

  • Location, location, location—choose a location that is likely to be used by hogs on a regular basis.
  • Don’t leave hogs in the trap. Remove them as soon as possible to eliminate other groups seeing or hearing them. 
  • Blood inside a trap is not a deterrent to other hogs. Fecal matter is! Take the time to remove all fecal matter after a catch. 
  • Make sure camera and gate control box batteries are charged and ready at all times. 
  • Make sure the feeder has corn and is working. Set the feeder to go off once daily, preferably 30 minutes before dark to eliminate some competition for food from daylight active critters. 
  • Inspect the trap and gate for damage after each catch. Repair any damage. 
  • Be patient! Make sure the entire sounder is inside the trap before dropping the gate. 

building hog trap

“Why bother? Most landowners under siege from feral hogs feel they don’t have a choice! I think anyone who understands just how destructive these animals are would feel the same. Hogs will eat anything! It is often thought they just eat crops or mast. They eat much more, like frogs, snakes, eggs of ground nesting birds, even baby rabbits and fawns! If they find it, they will eat it. They are also very destructive to native plant communities. Left unchecked, they take over the land and out-compete native wildlife for food and space.”

Brighter Days Ahead

Since we took the leap and invested in the Jager Pro™ Hog Control System in June of this year we have caught 45 hogs in 4 drops of the gate. Dr. Jones has caught another 37 hogs on his farm. Do we still have hogs? Yes. Have we won? No.

The difference is we feel somewhat in control…before we felt helpless. The frequency of hogs on the cameras is nowhere near as often. Now, when hogs come onto our land there is a good chance the entire group will be caught and killed. That is a far cry from hoping to shoot one or two only to have the remainder of the group back the next night.

After more than a decade of fighting the feral hog invasion we finally feel we have a chance to turn things around. It will take continued commitment on our part but it will also require participation from other landowners willing to fight for their land. Education is essential. If you own land and plan to manage for the native wildlife we all love, feral hogs have no place in that plan. Hogs are attracted to the improvements we make for native wildlife and the best way to combat them is to build a better hog trap!

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The BoarBuster is a research-based, cutting-edge trapping system developed as a solution for managing the nation's exploding feral hog population.

The Problem

Feral hogs cause approximately $2 billion in damage to U.S. land and crops each year. Farmers, Ranchers, Hunters, National and State Parks, and Golf Courses all feel the effect of this damage. They pose risks for disease transmission among livestock, pets and humans, while competing for resources with native wildlife and contaminating water supplies.

The Research

Research suggests that control methods must eliminate approximately 75% of the population just to keep up with the hogs annual reproductive capacity. Feral pigs can have two and sometimes three litters each year with up to 12 pigs per litter. Conventional trapping systems have an insufficient capture rate of 49% and trapping is often the most effective method to mitigate damage.

The Solution

Scientific research conducted over a four-year period by The Noble Research Institute demonstrates that the BoarBuster™ feral hog trapping system captures 88% of the animals in a given area, effectively reducing the overall population. Suspended traps limit trap-shy behavior associated with traditional corral traps.

BoarBuster™ can be observed and dropped remotely from anywhere with Internet service, is mobile so you can take the trap to the hogs and easily set up within 30 minutes, and has an integrated load-out door to easily remove hogs from the trap.

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How to Bait A Pig Trap

net pig trap with corn bait in the center

How to bait the trap.

Sounds easy, right? Pigs like corn. And, if your trap is well placed, putting a pile of corn out will generally do the job. 

The typical feed corn from the local co-op or Tractor Supply store is your best bait for trapping hogs in the South and Southwestern parts of the United States, especially for Texas, Louisiana, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, Georgia and Florida. In other parts of the world like Asia, Australia and Europe, any inexpensive, local grain will work.

But there are a few things to keep in mind. 

1. How does the season affect baiting a wild hog trap?

Pigs are smart, and corn is an enticing treat — except when there is something even more enticing. Wild hogs have keen instincts that allow them to know which food options are the most nutrient-rich. 

Early in the spring, corn has to compete with fresh growing sprouts, either those growing wild, or those just emerging from a farmer’s field. This is the time of year when the corn is least attractive, AND the time when a farmer’s hard work is most at risk. 

Ideally, you would be trapping prior to planting season and would have conditioned pigs to find your corn away from your fields. However, people often don’t realize they have a pig problem until they see the destruction firsthand. 

Most trap companies recommend that you trap year round, and, it’s true that year-round trapping is a best practice. This is particularly true if you have a trap that is both easier to move and can catch the whole sounder. Once the sounder is eliminated, move it to a new location. If you catch more pigs, it proves that a new sounder has migrated onto your land. 

That said, Spring is the most difficult time to trap because store-bought corn has to compete with even more delicious, protein-rich ground sprouts and seedlings. 

If you’ve managed the pig problem all year, it means you might notice fewer pigs in your trap. But if the hogs continue to wreak havoc on your land, this could indicate the wild hogs have learned to avoid your bait. So you may need to add an attractant to sweeten the pot.

trip wire hog trap

2. Where to place the feed and trap.

Pigs are creatures of habit and highly paranoid. I suppose we would all be paranoid if we were made of bacon, but you can use these two things to your advantage when placing your feed. 

Because pigs are so paranoid, they look for a safe place to sleep.

If you set up the trap too close to their sleeping spot, they’ll get scared and scatter, and you never want to scatter the sounder. It just makes them harder to scatter. 

When scouting your property , look for a place halfway between where the sounder sleeps at night and where they cool off during the day — somewhere they go often because pigs do not sweat. This means they need to find a place close to water or mud.

Wild hogs tend to eat along the way. Consider placing your bait near a tree line. Again, pigs are paranoid, and when they travel, they like the security of the tree line. 

Things to consider in site selection:

  • Bedding and feeding locations
  • Natural land features (tree lines and similar features)
  • Trees are a great place to both keep your sounder cool and get them to start feeding

3. How much bait should I use in my hog trap?

Again, trapping one or two pigs will not be enough to protect your land. You must catch the whole sounder. Feed is expensive, so you don’t want to put out too much during conditioning, but if you have a continuous catch trap like the Pig Brig Trap, then you also don’t want to put out too little. You want to keep them coming, so you can catch them all. When wondering how much feed to put out to catch wild pigs, a good rule to consider is 4 pounds of feed per pig. This is where a game camera comes in handy to help you know exactly how much bait you need. Generally, if you’re not using a game camera to know the exact size of the sounder you’re going to overbait your trap.

trip wire hog trap

4. How to condition the trap.

Consistency is the key. Whenever you approach the trap site, do so in the same way, and at the same time.  

Feral hogs are an exotic livestock species and adjust quickly to human activity. If you are consistent in your conditioning and baiting, they will adjust to your presence and learn not to fear you or your trap.

Baiting near dark around the same time, again and again, will acclimate feral hogs to your activity and they will quickly associate those sounds and activity with the arrival of food.

And get loud ! Don’t worry about talking or the sound of your engine running, even your favorite music on the truck radio. Those sounds can help with conditioning. 

One Pig Brig trapper said he always played “Meat and Potato Man” by Alan Jackson every time he visited his traps. 

When the sounds of humans fade away, the feral hogs will think it’s chow-time and they’ll get right to it. This also reduces the chance that non-target animals get involved.

When you’re conditioning the trap you want to start with spreading your bait around the trap. Roughly 90% of bait outside the trap and 10% inside. This helps the pigs get used to your new food source for them, and allows them to get used to the trap slowly. 

Setting the trap is a long game, and making sure they get used to your trap is step one.

5. Avoiding non-target animals in trapping wild hogs.

Pigs are not the only creatures that like corn, and in many instances, a hunter or farmer may want to be very careful not to trap the wrong animals. 

The first way to avoid catching deer, goats, sheep, or even the neighbor’s dog is to select a trap that these animals typically do not enter. 

Homemade traps and gated coral traps are the worst when it comes to trapping animals you do not want to catch. 

The Pig Brig Trap is much better for avoiding bystander catches because entrance into the trap depends on an animal’s rooting instincts. Deer, goats, sheep, or even the neighbor’s dog do not root, so they are usually safe. Not only do trappers want to avoid catching the wrong animals, but they also want to avoid wasting feed. But how?

The Best Bait For Pig Traps

To reduce wasting feed on non-target animals like deer, many trappers look for bait that pigs will eat, but other animals won’t. The best option is to ferment your corn. Fermented corn is also weather durable and a great option to avoid wasting feed during rain or wet seasons. If you are having problems with other animals stealing your bait, ferment it. Deer and other game will avoid it, and pigs still love it. Important tip, however, do not ferment your corn near your home (or anyone else’s). It stinks. And it’s an acidic, sour stink that sticks in the air. So, pick a fermentation site that you don’t like to visit. Because fermentation requires a little more effort and has a lot more stink, some trappers take a shortcut: They soak their feed in diesel fuel. This is a dangerous, wasteful shortcut that we strongly discourage because it also damages the environment.

The problem with diesel fuel 

Soaking bait in diesel fuel is a lazy-man's shortcut that is expensive and oftentimes ineffective. While it is true that wild hogs are eating machines that will devour virtually anything - including corn soaked in diesel - they are also intelligent creatures. Unlike fermentation, diesel is not a natural smell and while some pigs will still eat it, some won’t. Diesel is also less effective during spring, summer and fall when there are other more natural options available. But, the problems don’t stop there. Dousing bait in diesel fuel causes point source pollution, potentially causing permanent damage to the same land you’re trying to protect. And, we don’t think that makes a lot of sense. Because not only does it damage the land, it contaminates the hog meet, and makes them sick. Meaning, because feral hogs are smart, they’ll avoid your bait and because of it your trap.

Alternatives that are better for your land than diesel fuel

If you use conventional traps with manual triggers and want to avoid non-target species, one possible solution could be to simply change the trigger style. Let’s say deer are the non-target species of concern, then simply not using a trip string trigger mechanism could do the trick. 

Another option is to consider a raised electric fence . Make it high enough that deer won’t go through it, but leave a gap in the wires at the bottom, so pigs can walk under it. 

There’s also the technique of using fermented rice bran or applying blood meal or emulsified egg solid-based repellents to whole corn during the conditioning phase of trapping.

All are better options than diesel if your goal is to protect your land.

But, the best way to make the most of your bait? Start with the right trap - a trap designed specifically for pigs, with no trip wires or gates. 

The Pig Brig Trap is exactly that. It is designed around a wild pig’s rooting instinct [link to how it works]. This design focuses on pigs not only makes the trap more effective, it greatly reduces by-catch, and the need for more complicated, or environmentally hazardous methods of deterring the trapping of non-target species.

Make Hog Trapping Easy With Pig Brig Trap Systems

Pig Brig Trap Systems is offering online webinars covering a wide variety of topics all developed to help you protect your land, livestock and livelihood. Following us on Facebook for ongoing tips and tricks from Pig Brig users around the world.

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How to Build a Hog Trap Without Welding: DIY Techniques and Materials

How to build a hog trap without welding.

To build a hog trap without welding, you have two options: box traps and corral traps.

Box traps are simple to make using wooden panels or timber, typically measuring four feet wide, eight feet long, and five feet high.

The trap door is built with timber and heavyweight stones, while a tripwire and holding mechanism are set up behind the door.

Corral traps are made of utility panels with mesh and steel T-posts.

They are usually circular in shape, and the trap door is secured using heavy-gauge wire or U-bolts.

Both traps should be set up in areas with evidence of hog presence, pre-baited, and checked daily.

It is also important to avoid sharp corners in the trap design, as hogs may escape over the top.

Did You Know?

1. The first known evidence of hog trapping dates back to ancient civilizations, where ancient Egyptians constructed intricate hog traps using reeds and ropes. 2. In rural areas of the southern United States, some farmers still rely on traditional methods of hog trapping such as building a “deadfall” trap made of logs or stones, effectively corralling the wild hogs. 3. Surprisingly, hog trapping without welding is possible by utilizing alternative joining methods like riveting or bolting, allowing the construction of traps using non-weldable materials such as plastic or wood. 4. In Australia, hog trapping has become a popular eco-tourism activity, offering visitors an opportunity to participate in hog eradication programs while learning about conservation efforts to protect native wildlife. 5. A little-known fact is that wild hogs are highly intelligent animals and quickly learn to avoid typical hog traps. This challenge has prompted innovative solutions, including the use of motion-activated trapping systems and sophisticated baiting techniques.

Types Of Non-Welding Traps

When it comes to building a hog trap without welding, there are two types of traps that work best: box traps and corral traps .

Box traps are simple and easy to make, using wooden panels or timber with a rectangular shape. The materials used for box traps are 2-by-4-inch and 1-by-4-inch or 1-by-6-inch wood fence panels. The most common box trap design is four feet wide, eight feet long, and five feet high .

On the other hand, corral traps are usually made of 20-by-5-foot utility panels with 4-by-4-inch square mesh and steel T-posts. These traps can catch entire sounders (groups of hogs) in a single capture .

Building A Box Trap Without Welding

Building a box trap without welding is a cost-effective and convenient option. The trap design typically involves the use of wooden panels or timber , which are laid out and secured using decking screw nails . The trap door is built using timber and two heavyweight stones . A latch is added to hold the door open. Additionally, a tripwire is set up just behind the trap door using a pulley system and tied down with a holding mechanism. To prevent pigs from jumping over a trap door that is less than five feet high, the opening above the trap can be covered with a piece of livestock panel or heavy-duty mesh wire . Box traps offer the advantages of being collapsible for easier transportation and storage.

Building A Corral Trap Without Welding

Corral traps are a popular and effective method for controlling feral hogs . Without the need for welding, you can easily build a corral trap using the following materials:

  • 16-foot livestock panels
  • Heavy-gauge wire or U-bolts

To construct the trap, follow these steps:

  • Start by cutting a trap door aperture in the middle of one of the livestock panels.
  • Install T-posts on each side of the door to provide added strength.
  • Use heavy-gauge wire or U-bolts to link the door to both the cattle panel and the T-posts.
  • For additional security, add an extra T-post on each side of the door.
  • To fasten the livestock panels to the T-posts, use heavy-gauge wire or U-bolts at intervals of 1 foot.

Remember that corral traps are an effective option for controlling feral hogs, and this simple method allows you to build one without welding.

Designing An Effective Hog Trap

When designing a hog trap without welding , there are a few key considerations to keep in mind:

  • The trap should be set up in a tear-drop shape , with the gate located in the narrow or funnel area.
  • Hard corners in the trap design should be avoided , as hogs may pile up and go over the top.
  • To enhance camouflage, the area inside the trap can have some brush or grass.
  • It is important to ensure that the hogs have enough room to move away from the trap.
  • The trap door can be saloon doors or hinged at the top, but must be wide enough for hogs to pass through without tripping and closing.
  • The doors should be braced at the top and bottom .
  • A wire is stretched from the prop to an area furthest from the door opening, with bait placed in a hole and the wire stretched over it at ground level.

The trap should be built using sturdy materials and should have a solid, secure gate that locks shut.

Avoid hard corners in the trap design as hogs may pile up and go over the top.

  • Ensure enough room for hogs to move away from the trap.
  • Use saloon doors or hinged doors wide enough for hogs to pass through without tripping and closing.
  • Brace the doors at the top and bottom to provide stability.
  • Stretch a wire from the prop to the furthest area from the door opening, placing bait in a hole and covering it with the wire at ground level.
  • Build the trap using sturdy materials and include a solid, secure gate that locks shut .

Tips For Successful Hog Trapping

To increase the chances of successfully trapping hogs, consider implementing the following tips:

  • Set up multiple traps in various locations to cover a wider area.
  • Pre-bait the traps and spread bait back towards the bait hole, but not along the trip wire, to attract the hogs.
  • Use screening cover to make the hogs feel more secure and improve trapping success.
  • Share a gate among multiple traps to save resources.
  • Vary the bait selection to attract a wider range of hogs.
  • Use small mesh to catch all hogs and avoid releasing trapped hogs.
  • Lastly, persistence is key – hogs may take some time to become accustomed to the trap and start entering it regularly.
Remember, implementing these strategies will help increase your chances of successfully trapping hogs.
  • Use multiple traps in different locations.
  • Pre-bait traps and spread bait towards the bait hole.
  • Provide screening cover for hogs.
  • Share a gate among traps.
  • Vary bait selection.
  • Use small mesh and avoid releasing trapped hogs.
  • Be persistent – hogs may take time to adapt to the trap.

Utilizing Remote Sensing Cameras For Increased Efficiency

To enhance trapping efficiency , remote sensing cameras can be employed. These cameras can be used to monitor hog activity , determine the number of hogs in a sounder , and establish the appropriate trap size . By monitoring hogs regularly entering the trap before setting the gate for capture, trapping efficiency can be significantly increased. Remote sensing cameras enable a more strategic approach to hog trapping , making it easier to track hog behavior and adjust trapping tactics accordingly.

Building a hog trap without welding is entirely possible and can be accomplished using various materials and techniques. Box traps and corral traps are two effective options that can help control feral hogs. By following the DIY techniques outlined above , you can construct your own hog trap and improve your success in trapping these destructive creatures. Remember to follow local regulations and consider safety measures when building and using hog traps.

Frequently Asked Questions

How to make a trap for a hog.

To create an effective trap for hogs, utilize sheep and goat panels or comparable materials with 4″ x 4″ squares that are 5′ high. Construct the trap in the problematic area by supporting it with t-posts or similar materials every 4 feet. Ensure that there are no gaps at the bottom of the trap to prevent hogs from escaping. By following these steps, you can establish a sturdy and secure hog trap to address the issue of damage in the area.

How do you attract pigs quickly?

To attract pigs quickly, it is important to employ a combination of enticing baits. While shelled corn is a popular choice, it is essential to get creative and diversify the bait options at different sites. Experiment with souring some grain to arouse their curiosity at one spot, while using shelled corn or milo at another. Alternatively, a mixture of dry dog food or a cheese-based catfish bait along with corn can also captivate their taste buds. By combining these various baits, you can pique the interest of pigs and draw them in swiftly.

What attracts hogs the best?

Although sweet corn is a favorite among hogs, it is not the only attraction for them. In addition to the recognizable smell, hogs are also drawn to the abundance of carbohydrates found in sweet corn. These carbohydrates provide hogs with the necessary energy to sustain their high activity levels, making sweet corn an irresistible treat. Furthermore, the sour smell created by soaked corn acts as an alluring scent specifically for hogs, effectively keeping other animals like deer at bay.

What is the best trap for pigs?

The best trap for pigs would be one that combines the effectiveness of corral traps with innovative design elements. While circular traps are highly recommended to prevent escape, incorporating retractable walls or movable partitions within the corral can enhance the success rate even further. This allows trappers to adjust the size of the trap based on the size of the pig group, ensuring that no space is wasted and all pigs can be efficiently captured. By continually adapting and improving upon the already effective corral trap design, trappers can maximize their chances of successfully catching large groups of pigs.

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COMMENTS

  1. Trigger Mechanisms

    How It Works. Once sufficient pressure is exerted on the line or wire, the trigger device releases the door and the trap is sprung. The amount of pressure required to spring the trap can be adjusted by tightening or loosening the trip wire. When using a multicatch trap door, a trip wire works best. The action needed to pull the prop from the ...

  2. Foolproof hog trap trip wire

    How to set an easy hog trap trip wire

  3. Hog trap trip wire set up

    This is my basic set up for my traps, hasn't failed me once.

  4. Hog Trapping

    The following video titled, Gate Triggering Mistakes will demonstrate three examples how trip wires would have missed 16 of 38 hogs captured for a horrendous 42% failure rate. Trapping cannot effectively reduce population densities using methods and equipment which only produce 58% success. Trip wires can be easily triggered by non-target ...

  5. NEW Hog Trap and Trigger Design

    Here is a new and improved hog trap design made to catch more hogs consistently including whole sounders. Double guillotine door, large corral utility panel...

  6. PDF Selecting a Manual Pig Trap Trigger

    This tripwire approach has accounted for thousands and thousands of wild pigs trapped but it is not as selective as the next three trigger types. Note the "short trigger" rig in use. Since the camera confirmed only one boar entering the trap, there was no need to bait him all the way to the back of the trap where the tripwire is normally set.

  7. PDF (USE ONLY WITH SLIDING DROP DOORS

    the trap door rope steel tabs with holes and welded to metal stake steel pin attached to tripwire - do not use anything with threads converting a root stick trigger to a trip wire: figure 1 (use only with sliding drop doors) bird's eye view tripwire pin inserted through washer tied at end of trap door rope . 1 ½ inches to 2 inches 3 inches

  8. Two Easy Methods On How To Build A Hog Trap Without Welding

    Step 4: Setting Up a Tripwire. Tripwire is the hog trap door trigger. To set up a tripwire for the trapdoor to engage, you'll need to decide where to set the wire. It's best to set it just a meter or two behind the trap door. That'll ensure the hog will be inside the trap and won't get hurt by the trap door falling.

  9. PDF Door modification on feral hog traps

    1- to 11⁄4-inch steel pipe, so take measurements to ensure a proper cut. If the rooter panels hang too low, a large hog en-tering the enclosure may trip the trap prematurely. 9. Cut the bracket to fit the rooter door frame. 10. Attach the bracket to the rooter door frame using nuts, bolts, and washers (Fig. 4A). 11.

  10. Hog Traps

    The Pig Brig Trap has been tested and continuously refined for over a decade, and it has been field-proven to help you eliminate your wild hog problem. And we stand behind that promise in 3 ways: Product Performance: We offer a 100-Day Money-Back Guarantee and a 1-Year Warranty on our Pig Brig Trap.

  11. Hog Traps for Wild Hogs

    DISCLAIMER: SET SAFETY PINS AROUND 12' DROP RING AFTER CRANKING UP CAGE TO REQUIRED HEIGHT AND BEFORE SETTING TRIP WIRE. HOG TRAP DROP RING WEIGHS OVER 500 LBS. Price: US$2299.99 : Quantity: These hog traps are well thought out and well built. They can easily fit into the back of a fleet-side pickup truck yet they can still catch 8 or 10 hogs.

  12. The XT Trap System

    The Pig Brig XT Trap System The Pig Brig XT is an all-in-one patented solution for feral hog trapping. The XT includes everything you need to trap feral hogs: the Base Trap Net and Boar Shield with Easy Pull Cable Seam, the Trap Cap, and the Hardware Kit. It's easy to use, simple to transport and set up, doesn't requir.

  13. How Does a Wild Hog Trap Work? Guillotine Trap Door 101

    Essentially there is a trigger or trip wire that releases a door to fall down similar to ... We have been asked to explain how a guillotine hog trap door works. Essentially there is a trigger or ...

  14. Top Ten Hog Trapping Mistakes

    Mistake #6 - Wrong Panel Selection. Several types of livestock panels are commonly used to build corral trap enclosures. These hog, sheep, goat and cattle panels range in heights between 34 and 52 inches tall, normally 16 feet long and contain mesh openings from two inches apart up to six inches apart. However, most commercial livestock ...

  15. Pig Brig Trap Systems

    Meet the perfect wild hog trap. The Pig Brig ® Trap is the most effective way to defend your land and livestock from feral hog damage, period. shop traps. 100-Day Return Policy. 1-Year Limited Warranty. Pay as low as $225/Month.

  16. Hog Trap Design

    5. Removing hogs from the trap. If hogs are going to be sold to a processor, simply back a trailer up to the trap door, place a cross tie across the gate opening to prevent them from going underneath the trailer and circle wide around to the backside of the trap. The hogs will move away from you and funnel toward the trailer. 6. Other trap designs

  17. Pig Brig Hog Trap with Sewn-in Trap Cap

    A 20-ft diameter base net with a dynamic drop strength of more than 8,000-ft-lbs as well as a vinyl-coated easy pull cable seam that makes opening and closing your trap a piece of cake. The boar shield is a heavy-duty, double wall of net that keeps big boars inside. pig brig hog traps.

  18. How to Build a Better Hog Trap

    Posts are driven on the outside of the trap with knobs facing inward. The remaining posts are evenly spaced around the trap. Posts are driven into the ground until only four inches remain above the panels. We use 12-gauge wire to secure the panels to the posts.". Keep the trap baited after a successful catch. Another.

  19. How to Set a Trip Line for a Hog Wild Trap

    Learn how to set a trip line so the hogs do all the work and shut the door themselves

  20. BoarBuster

    The Solution. Scientific research conducted over a four-year period by The Noble Research Institute demonstrates that the BoarBuster™ feral hog trapping system captures 88% of the animals in a given area, effectively reducing the overall population. Suspended traps limit trap-shy behavior associated with traditional corral traps.

  21. How to Make a Trip Wire Trap

    This is a new and improved version of the trap shown in my previous video, "How to Build a Trip Wire Snare". Enjoy. #NightHawkInLight-~-~~-~~~-~~-~-Check out...

  22. How To Bait A Pig Trap

    Roughly 90% of bait outside the trap and 10% inside. This helps the pigs get used to your new food source for them, and allows them to get used to the trap slowly. Setting the trap is a long game, and making sure they get used to your trap is step one. 5. Avoiding non-target animals in trapping wild hogs.

  23. How to Build a Hog Trap Without Welding: DIY Techniques and Materials

    Start by cutting a trap door aperture in the middle of one of the livestock panels. Install T-posts on each side of the door to provide added strength. Use heavy-gauge wire or U-bolts to link the door to both the cattle panel and the T-posts. For additional security, add an extra T-post on each side of the door.