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Visit a Federal Court

Many federal courthouses are historic buildings, and all are designed for the public to visit and learn first-hand about the tradition and purpose of the American judicial process. The public may visit a court to watch each step of the federal judicial process, with few exceptions.  

Access for All

A person who wishes to observe a court in session may check the court calendar online or at the courthouse and watch a proceeding. Our Constitution and court tradition give citizens right of access to court proceedings. Citizens gain confidence in the courts by seeing judicial work in action, and learn first-hand how the judicial system works.

Court dockets and some case files are available on the Internet through the Public Access to Court Electronic Records system (PACER), at https://pacer.uscourts.gov . In addition, nearly every federal court maintains a website with information about court rules and procedures.

In a few situations the public may not have full access to court records and court proceedings. In a high-profile trial, for example, available space may limit the number of observers. Or, security reasons may limit access, such as the protection of a juvenile or a confidential informant. Finally, a judge may seal certain documents, such as confidential business records, certain law enforcement reports, and juvenile records.

Access for Teachers and Students

Teachers should contact their local U.S. District Clerk's Office to set up a visit. Because the courts tend to be very busy, teachers should be prepared to allow several weeks of lead time when arranging a visit. The personnel in the clerk’s office can help teachers select an appropriate date for a class visit and can even find out what cases are on the docket if students wish to observe a court session. The clerk also will provide important logistical information, such as parking, for court visits. Some questions you may want to ask the clerk’s office:

  • How many students may I bring to the court at one time?
  • Which days and times are best to bring students to the court?
  • What can my students do at the court?
  • If we come to see a specific case and it settles, is there a back-up activity we might do?
  • What web resources should we review before the visit?
  • What are the rules of court decorum and dress the students must follow?
  • Are there any judges who would be willing to speak to students? Prosecutors? Public defenders? Other court personnel? How can I set up a meeting with them?

Before Visiting a Court

The best time to visit a court is during a unit on the judicial system or the rights that the system protects. In this context, students can put their new knowledge to use by observing and interpreting court sessions and finding out more information from judges and other court personnel. In particular, it may be helpful for students to learn about the structure, functions, and procedures of the court before attending.

Follow up After Visit

Following up on a visit to the court is just as important as the preparation for the visit. Teachers should reinforce learning from the court experience through continued classroom activities on the judicial system. Whenever possible, they should refer to what students learned while at the courts to help them make connections between the court and their classroom experiences.

It is also important to follow up with a note of thanks, preferably signed by the students, addressed to those who helped make the experience meaningful.

Visiting a Courthouse

Learning centers and educational exhibits across the country include:

  • Justice Anthony M. Kennedy Library and Learning Center , Robert T. Matsui U.S. Courthouse in Sacramento
  • Court History Museum , Everett McKinley Dirksen U.S. Courthouse in Chicago
  • Federal Court Learning Center , Birch Bayh Federal Building and U.S. Courthouse in Indianapolis
  • The Judicial Learning Center , Thomas F. Eagleton U.S. Courthouse in St. Louis
  • Judicial Education and History Center , Rush H. Limbaugh, Sr., U.S. Courthouse in Cape Girardeau
  • Justice for All: Courts and the Community Learning Center , Thurgood Marshall U.S. Courthouse in New York City
  • Federal Judicial Learning Center & Museum , U.S. Bankruptcy Courthouse in Oklahoma City

Washington, DC

The  E. Barrett Prettyman U.S. Courthouse  in the District of Columbia, because of its location in the nation's capital, handles many cases that shape the history of our country. There is an exhibit of some of these cases in the William Benson Bryant Annex of the D.C. courthouse. The next time you are in Washington, you are invited to visit the courthouse to learn about these cases from the past that have an impact on American life today. You also may want to observe a live trial. Courthouses are public buildings and courtrooms are open to the public.

Learn more about the history of the D.C. Circuit . 

The following are some of the historic cases heard at the U.S. Courthouse in the District of Columbia.

Watergate The Nixon Tapes Executive Privilege Executive Privilege and the Fifth Amendment

The First Amendment The Pentagon Papers Arthur Miller The Mayday Protestors

Criminal Law and Criminal Trials The Assassination of President Lincoln The Assassination of President Garfield Due Process Rights A Union Leader and the Law Temporary Insanity Defense The Attempt to Assassinate President Reagan

Courts in War Time Military Commissions "Axis Sally" The President at War

Enforcing Equal Justice Guarantees School Desegregation Equal Pay for Women Women on Navy Ships

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Effective July 1, 2023, Classroom Law Project is now Civics Learning Project.

After 40 years as Oregon’s leader in Civic Education, we’re excited to move into the future with our new name. We will continue to provide the broad range of engaging civics education programs you know and love, just under a name that reflects our mission and work more clearly.

You can find us online at www.civicslearning.org . Please update your bookmarks.

Our email addresses have also changed. Messages sent to our old addresses will forward to us, but please update your contacts and watch for messages from our new addresses.

Thank you for being part of our community! Let us know if you have any questions.

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Your students will see the law come alive during a Civics Learning Project Courthouse Tour! Nothing can come close to the real-life interactions students will observe between judges, attorneys, and their clients in these courthouses. The Courthouse Experience Tour will provide you and your students with topics to discuss long after this exciting field trip is over.

We have changed the process for scheduling Courthouse Experience Tours.

Click on your region below to learn how to register.

Jackson County Courthouse Experience Tours

Jefferson county courthouse experience tours, lane county courthouse experience tours, multnomah county courthouse experience tours, virtual courthouse experience tours.

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LAW & ORDER TV SERIES FILMING LOCATIONS

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Law & Order  is the longest running crime drama on television police procedural and films on location in our favorite city, New York. The series follows the lives of several police officers and prosecutors who represent the public interest in the criminal justice system. Its wild success inspired the Law & Order  franchise; three other television dramas under the same brand: Law & Order: Special Victims Unit , Law & Order: Criminal Intent , and  Law & Order: Trial by Jur y.

Often episodes were inspired by actual cases, especially in the first few seasons. This “ripped from the headlines” style entranced audiences who quickly elevated the show into a ratings bonanza. New York City Mayors Rudy Giuliani and Michael Bloomberg, attorney William Kunstler and Bronx Congressman Jose Serrano have all made cameo appearances as themselves throughout the seasons.

Ever wonder the locations where Law & Order is filmed?

Stay up to date with what’s filming in New York on our  Blog  for a chance see your favorite shows and TV stars in action in New York.

The Law & Order  series—with the exception of the reality series,  Crime and Punishment —have been filmed almost entirely in the New York City area. This is unusual, as many television dramas are taped in the Los Angeles area, even if the program is “set” in New York City.  This means every arrest, each conviction, and all the jaw dropping moments you remember happened right here in the Big Apple.  So if you can’t get your Law & Order fix from a TV marathon, its time to visit NYC and see where the live action takes place. Locations featured on the series include:

Foley Square

Think about Law and Order and what comes to mind? Most certainly the infamous Courthouse scenes!  See where the Law and order court scenes filmed and Marvel at the New York Supreme Court, also known as the NY Courthouse. The Supreme Court is New York’s trial court, located in lower Manhattan’s beautiful Foley Square. Jack McCoy and the other attorneys trek up and down these stairs in every episode. The square is often featured in  Law & Order  as well because of its long association with the NY County, NY State, and judicial building. The history and notoriety of this landmark cannot be missed on a trip to New York!

Located on the west side of Manhattan is the neighborhood of Chelsea , a historic and diverse neighborhood that is also home to the General Theological Seminary now The Highline Hotel on West 20th Street. This building has been featured in both Law & Order and Law & Order: SVU.

One Police Plaza

This is epicenter of the real NYPD and countless television versions. Also known as “Puzzle Palace” it is the largest NYPD headquarter in New York City and featured many of the squads in Law & Order including Major Case Squad, Special Victims Unit, Emergency Services Unit, Crime Scene Unit. Within these walls police work tirelessly both on television and in reality to piece together evidence and build cases.

It would be impossible to see all the memorable Law and Order sites in one day, let alone one tour, so check out these other famous hotspots from the show.

Chelsea Piers

Take a walk or bike ride along the Hudson River and see the 200,000 square feet that make up Chelsea Piers, Manhattan’s largest center for film and television production. Inside are the sets of Law & Order and Law & Order:SVU where all the harrowing courtroom drama and police interrogations took place. It’s not a bad time to check the USS Intrepid, but watch your head because helic

Union Square

Attorneys, detectives, and police officers are often seen strolling through Union Square Park. Just to the east visitors can check out Pete’s Tavern. This bar and restaurant often appears on Law & Order has the hotspot to hang after a long day.

If you take the NYC TV & Movie Tour or the When Harry Met Seinfeld bus tours you may recognize some locations from this long running series. The tours don’t feature any specific locations from the series but drive through every neighborhood in New York City where the shows have filmed.

List Of Filming Locations That Have Appeared in  Law & Order   (but are not necessarily featured on our New York tours) :

  • Lafayette Grill & Bar, 24 Franklin St
  • Foley Square, Centre St @ Reade St
  • Centre St @ Pearl
  • Booker T. Washington School, 103 W. 107th St
  • Cannon’s Pub, 2792 Broadway
  • Druids, 736 10th Ave @ 50th
  • Stop 1 Deli, 748 10th Ave
  • Pier 62, W. 23rd St @ Hudson River
  • Marine Transfer Station, W. 59th St @ West Side Highway
  • International House, 500 Riverside Drive
  • Grant’s Tomb, W. 123rd St and Riverside Drive
  • Community Garden, 600 E. 9th St @ Avenue C
  • Lehman College, 250 Bedford Park Blvd West
  • Teacher’s College, 525 W. 120th St
  • Carnegie Deli, 854 7th Ave
  • Wellington Hotel, 871 7th Ave
  • Rhiga Royal Hotel, 151 W. 54th St
  • Riverside Park, 96th St Tennis Courts
  • Artie’s Delicatessen, 2290 Broadway
  • Ouest Restaurant, 2315 Broadway
  • Liberty Travel, 2280 Broadway
  • Nation’s Rent, 91 N. 12th St
  • West Bank Café, 407 W. 42nd St
  • Wien Stadium, Columbia University Baker Field, 218th St @ Park Terrace
  • Chelsea Piers, W. 23rd St @ 12th Ave
  • Hudson’s, 3713 Riverdale Avenue
  • McDonald’s, 208 Dyckman St
  • Scott J. Salon, 257 Columbus Ave
  • Emerald Inn, 205 Columbus Ave
  • Quick Park, 38 Bowery
  • Tudor City Greens, Tudor City Place @ East 43rd St
  • Central Park, @ W. 63rd St, and various other locations
  • Weber’s, 2064 Broadway
  • General Theological Seminary, 175 9th Ave
  • New York Adorned, 47 Second Avenue
  • Princeton Review, 2315 Broadway
  • Ecco Restaurant, 124 Chambers St
  • Molyvos, 871 7th Ave
  • Gravity, 119 W. 56th St
  • Getty Gas Station, 242 Dyckman St
  • Becco, 335 W. 46th St
  • May Matthews Playground, W. 46th St, bet. 9th & 10th
  • Fischer Locksmith, 646 9th Ave
  • J.P. Warde’s Saloon, Avenue A @ 1st St
  • Brooklyn Borough Hall, 209 Joralemon St
  • Westside Tavern, 360 W. 23rd St
  • Leo House, 332 W. 23rd St
  • Lansky Lounge, 104 Norfolk St
  • Olympic Diner, 115 Delancy St
  • Max Mara, 434 W. Broadway
  • Brooklyn Correctional Facility, Flushing Ave bet. Clermont & Vanderbilt Aves.
  • Bishop Ford High School, 500 19th St
  • Amoco Service Station, 3010 Riverdale Ave
  • Port Authority Ship Terminal, 711 Twelfth Ave
  • Ari, 47 W. Broadway
  • Furla, 430 W. Broadway
  • Nancy Hoffman Gallery, 429 W. Broadway
  • Saatchi & Saatchi, 375 Hudson St
  • Code Fab, 33 Little W. 12th St
  • Jean Luc, 507 Columbus Ave
  • St. Agnes High School, 555 West End Ave
  • Church of St. Peter & St. Andrew, 263 W. 86th St
  • Municipal Building, 1 Centre St
  • Market Diner, W 43rd St @ 11th Ave
  • Barnes & Noble, 675 6th Ave
  • Cedar Tavern, 82 University Place
  • Reservoir, 70 University Place
  • City Island Avenue @ Sutherland St
  • Morell’s Wine Bar & Café, 1 Rockefeller Plaza
  • Waldorf Astoria, 100 E. 50th St
  • Metropolitan Bar, Madison Street @ Pearl St
  • Gov. Alfred E. Smith Housing, 15 St. James Place
  • Mama Mexico, 2672 Broadway
  • P.S. 173, 306 Fort Washington Avenue
  • Church of the Most Holy Redeemer, 173 E. 3rd St
  • Askura Park, W. 122nd St @ Riverside Drive
  • Payson Playground, Park House, Payson Ave & Seaman Ave
  • Dyckman Job Center, 4660 Broadway
  • Riverside Church, 490 Riverside Drive
  • Tompkins Square Park, E. 7th St & Ave A
  • Ace Hardware, 817 Amsterdam Ave
  • Loews 84th St Theater, Broadway @ 84th St
  • St. Agnes School for Boys, 55 West End Ave
  • Circle Line Boat Terminal, W. 43rd St @ 12th Ave
  • India House, 1 Hanover Square
  • GM Building, 767 5th Ave
  • Frederick Douglass Playground, W. 101st St & Amsterdam Ave
  • P.S. 173, 306 Fort Washington Ave
  • J. Hood Wright Park, 174th St & Ft. Washington Ave
  • Privilege, 565 W. 23rd St
  • Pocket Park, 24th St bet. 8th & 9th Aves
  • Peppers, 95 Leonard St
  • Goodrich Pharmacy, 104 W. 70th St
  • Chelsea Car Wash, 10th Ave bet. W. 14th & W. 15th Sts
  • Isham Park, Park Terrace East @ 215th St
  • Columbia Univeristy, Baker Field, 218th St & Park Terrace West
  • Fulton Houses Playground, 9th Ave bet. 16th and 17th Sts
  • SoHo Square Park, 6th Ave @ Spring Street
  • Dyckman Marina, 348 Dyckman Street
  • Metropolitan Museum, South Plaza Park, 5th Ave at 80th St
  • Stuyvesant Square Park, E. 16th St @ Rutherford Ave.
  • Queensborough Community College, 222-05 56th Ave
  • St. Andrews Plaza, behind 1 Centre St @ Chambers St
  • Tremont-Crotona Day Care Ctr, 1600 Crotona Park East
  • Brooklyn Navy Yard, Buildings 30, 27, 58, & 3
  • Steinway & Sons, Steinway Place & 19th Avenue
  • HSBC Bank, 739 Amsterdam Avenue
  • Stanhope Park Hyatt, 995 Fifth Avenue
  • Broadway National Bank, W. 28th St @ 5th Ave
  • Rikers Island Penitentiary, Building J.A.T.C., 1414 Hazen St
  • Coler Memorial Hospital, Main St, Roosevelt Island
  • Dewitt Clinton Park, W. 52nd St, bet. 11th & 12th Aves

* In an effort to stay current, we are constantly updating our tours with new locations and cannot guarantee the presence of locations mentioned on our site. If you have a particular interest in locations from a specific TV show or movie, please let your tour guide know and we will do our best to accommodate your request.

TAKE THE TOUR THAT FEATURES SOME OF THESE FILMING LOCATIONS!

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NYC TV & Movie Tour

Straddle fiction and reality as you visit famous sites from both the big and small screen! See a mix of nostalgic locations from Friends, Seinfeld, When Harry Met Sally, and more.

  • Tag Private Bus/Vehicle Tour
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Private Law & Order SVU Sites Tour

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NMCOURTS.Gov – The Judicial Branch of New Mexico

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Most popular pages, tours of the historic supreme court building are provided throughout the year..

The New Mexico Supreme Court welcomes tour groups of all types interested in visiting our historic Courthouse and Supreme Court Law Library. The Court and Law Library are regularly visited by school groups, community organizations, individuals, and others. The Court provides free staff-led public tours throughout the year.

Q: How may I arrange a tour of the Supreme Court  or Law Library?.

A: Individuals and groups interested in a tour of the Supreme Court Building should submit a request using the Tour Request Form below. Tour requests must be made two weeks in advance.

Q: How long is a tour of the building? A: Tours of the building usually take 45-60 minutes.

Q: What if I need special accommodations as covered under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990? A: Please indicate what your special needs are at the time you schedule a visit. We will arrange for reasonable accommodations under the ADA.

Q: How many people may I have in a visiting group? A: The Court can best accommodate groups of up to 20 individuals, but arrangements may be made to accommodate larger groups.

Q: What security protocols should I be aware of when visiting the New Mexico Supreme Court? A: Listed below are the established security protocols when visiting the Court: ● All persons entering the New Mexico Supreme Court Building are subject to search. ● The Supreme Court’s electronic device policy applies to visitors, including tour groups. Recording devices of any kind are not permitted. Please do not bring cameras, cell phones/smart phones, laptops, tablets, etc. ● The Supreme Court’s security policies do not allow backpacks or large purses, and this restriction applies to tour groups. Please do not bring backpacks, bags, or large purses. ● Court employees will not hold any prohibited items. ● All visitors are required to sign in and wear visitor badges. To assist with the security screening process, visitors and groups should submit a list of attendees in advance. ● Please allow up to 15 minutes for security screening.

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Tour Request Form

This form must be submitted at least TWO WEEKS before the requested date of the visit.

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  • Adult Guardianship
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  • Court Improvement Project
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  • Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA)
  • Judicial Performance Evaluation
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  • Animas Underground Basin Adjudication
  • Cow Creek Water Rights Adjudication
  • Lower Rio Grande Adjudication
  • San Juan River Basin Adjudication
  • Language Access Services
  • Court-Appointed Attorneys

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Supreme Court Law Library

Explore section, most popular pages.

F. A. Q. – Supreme Court of New Mexico Courthouse Tours Frequently Asked Questions

The New Mexico Supreme Court welcomes tour groups of all types interested in visiting our historic Courthouse and Supreme Court Law Library. The Court and Law Library are regularly visited by school groups, community organizations, individuals, and others. The Court provides free staff-led public tours throughout the year.

Q: How may I arrange a tour of the Supreme Court or Law Library? A: Individuals and groups interested in a tour of the Supreme Court Building should submit a request using the Tour Request Form below. Tour requests must be made two weeks in advance.

Q: How long is a tour of the building? A: Tours of the building usually take 45-60 minutes.

Q: What if I need special accommodations as covered under the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990? A: Please indicate what your special needs are at the time you schedule a visit. We will arrange for reasonable accommodations under the ADA.

Q: How many people may I have in a visiting group? A: The Court can best accommodate groups of up to 20 individuals, but arrangements may be made to accommodate larger groups. 

Q: What security protocols should I be aware of when visiting the New Mexico Supreme Court? A: Listed below are the established security protocols when visiting the Court:

● All persons entering the New Mexico Supreme Court Building are subject to search. ● The Supreme Court’s electronic device policy applies to visitors, including tour groups. Recording devices of any kind are not permitted. Please do not bring cameras, cell phones/smart phones, laptops, tablets, etc. ● The Supreme Court’s security policies do not allow backpacks or large purses, and this restriction applies to tour groups. Please do not bring backpacks, bags, or large purses. ● Court employees will not hold any prohibited items. ● All visitors are required to sign in and wear visitor badges. To assist with the security screening process, visitors and groups should submit a list of attendees in advance. ● Please allow up to 15 minutes for security screening.

The Supreme Court Law Library offers tours to individuals or groups of all ages. If you or someone you know is interested please fill out the digital form on the Supreme Court’s website, which can be found by clicking here .

Virtual Tour

Watch our Supreme Court Law Library Virtual Tour on YouTube by clicking here.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rr7v25Mgiho

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The Supreme Court, Civil Branch in New York County offers free tours by appointment to groups of students (fifth grade through college), civic organizations, senior citizens’ groups and others interested in getting a first hand look at the New York State court system.

Tour groups meet inside 60 Centre Street under the beautifully restored and much-reproduced mural, “Law Through the Ages,” which adorns the court’s historic rotunda. As the tour proceeds, participants enjoy an informative lecture on the structure of the New York State court system, learn about the jury process and its place in our democracy, get an overview of careers in the courts and observe a real trial. Young people or others may even choose, instead of a lecture, to play the role of Judge, lawyer, witness or juror in a mock trial. Tours can be tailored to a number of educational goals to ensure that group members complete their experience with a deepened understanding of the New York State judicial system.

Court Tours are currently suspended due to COVID-19.

The Royal Courts of Justice

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The Royal Courts of Justice

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The Royal Courts of Justice (London’s High Court) is an enchanting building on London’s Fleet Street.

Next Available Tours: Tuesday 13 February at 12:00 (fully booked) Thursday 15 February at 15:15 Friday 16 February at 12:00 Wednesday 21 February at 15:15 Wednesday 28 February at 10:45 Thursday 29 February at 12:00 Tuesday 5 March at 10:30

The Royal Courts of Justice is reminiscent of a cathedral in both style and scale. Soaring arches and beautiful stained glass windows ornamented with the coats of arms of Lord Chancellors and keepers of the Great Seal, combined with a mosaic marble floor leading to a maze of enchanting corridors to create a majestic setting or exciting visit to one of London’s best kept secrets.

Located on the Strand and just a few minutes from London’s Theatreland. A visit to London would not be complete without seeing the Royal Courts of Justice.

Important: Kindly be informed that all bookings must be pre-booked and paid in advance. We do not accept on-site bookings or payments. All booking requests should be made directly through us via the online booking form and the Royal Courts of Justice  should not be contacted directly.

Thank you for your understanding.

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Breathtaking Tours

With miles of enchanting corridors and stunning 19th century Gothic architecture, it is easy to immerse yourself into the history of the courts.

With tours starting from as little as £15 for children (14 years of age and under) & £17 for adults why not discover the amazing history of this fabulous building by booking a tour today.

School Groups are encouraged to familiarise themselves with the exact content of our tours in advance of booking.

Book Today!

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New Tour  – Half-Day London Legal

Join us for a unique (and unforgettable) half-day London legal walking tour which combines a tour of inside the fabulous Royal Courts of Justice with a walk through some of London’s beautiful Inns of Court.

Highlights:

  • Unique London Legal Tour by guides with legal expertise (some who are judicial-office holders).
  • Hear about the history and the development of the Inns and how legal training has evolved over many centuries, whilst walking around them and taking photographs at your leisure.
  • A tour of inside the Royal Courts of Justice (no photography allowed inside the RCJ).
  • See external views of several very important historical sites,  and hear about the fascinating judicial history and of these sites and their most famous cases.
  • Due to the expert knowledge of our Guides we can tailor the tour to meet your group’s individual needs e.g by including a trip to the Old Bailey.
  • We can’t guarantee the weather, but we guarantee the tour will always take place.
  • Tours last between two and a half to three hours.
  • Group bookings only

Please contact us for further details

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The Royal Courts are close to many London Hotels and attractions, including Covent Garden, Somerset House, the London Eye, Big Ben and St Paul's Cathedral. 

law courts tour

London Underground

Temple and Holborn (7 Minutes by foot), Chancery Lane (9 Minutes by foot), St Paul's Tube  (15 Minutes by foot)

law courts tour

Bus numbers 4, 11, 15, 23, 26, 76, 172, and 341 stop outside the RCJ.

Bus numbers 1, 59, 68, 91, 168, 171, 188, 243, 521 and X68 stop on Kingsway and Aldwych.

law courts tour

There are numerous cycle hire docks near by.

law courts tour

Opening Hours

The Courts are open from 9:30am to 16:30pm Monday to Friday all year round.

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Disabled Access

The building is DDA (Disability Discrimination Act) compliant for wheelchair users.

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The 1948 Economic Moment That Might Explain Our Own

In the aftermath of world war ii, many americans found themselves frustrated by the policies of the president, harry s. truman..

This transcript was created using speech recognition software. While it has been reviewed by human transcribers, it may contain errors. Please review the episode audio before quoting from this transcript and email [email protected] with any questions.

From “The New York Times,” I’m Michael Barbaro. This is “The Daily.”

[MUSIC PLAYING]

On Friday’s show, we explored President Biden’s political challenge with a core group of supporters, Black voters. Today, his challenge with voters motivated by the economy at a time when it looks good on paper but still feels bad for so many Americans. My colleague Nate Cohn says that, to understand the situation, it helps to look back at another election 76 years ago.

It’s Monday, February 5th.

Nate, we just got the latest batch of economic news on Friday, which showed a surge in hiring, a very strong US labor market. And it really highlighted this conundrum we’ve talked about a lot on the show, which is that we’re living in a pretty healthy economy. And yet voters are still quite sour on the economy.

And now that we’ve entered this general election phase of the presidential campaign, that dynamic looms as a pretty major question mark over the entire race because it doesn’t feel like we have a precedent for it. Does this sentiment help Trump? Does it help Biden? But you say, Nate, we actually do have a precedent for this, this weird economy in an election year. It has happened before. So just explain.

Yes, it has. But I’ve been searching for a long time to find an economic and political moment that resembles the economy we have today. And that’s been really hard because, in the era of modern consumer confidence data, there just isn’t an economy like this one. There isn’t an economy that has this weird combination of low unemployment, high economic growth, and a dissatisfied electorate.

But I wound up digging just a little bit further back, just before the era of modern consumer confidence data. And I did find an economic moment that actually bore a lot of resemblance to the economy today. And it also had very similar political characteristics to what we see today, with a dissatisfied country under circumstances that look a lot like what we’ve seen since the pandemic.

And it happened to be an election year, and a very famous election year at that.

OK, first of all, congratulations. That seems like a really big find.

What is the year?

The year is 1948.

So postwar but just barely.

Just barely. And the post-pandemic economy, the postwar economy after World War II was really weird.

Housewives shopping for their holiday dinners found food prices 40 percent higher than 18 months ago.

The end of wartime rationing led all of these consumers to immediately start buying goods again and led inflation to skyrocket.

Trying to replenish their wardrobes, Americans found clothing up 19 percent.

At the same time, all these troops had come home from overseas, and they were looking for housing. And there was a housing shortage.

Against the twin handicaps of spiraling costs and material shortages, there is no veteran problem more pressing than housing.

And a lot of that is like what we see today. Obviously, the housing market is really tight right now. And more generally, this is the only moment in the era of modern economic data when a president oversaw an economy with inflation over 7 percent while unemployment stayed 4 percent and the economy kept growing like it did today. There’s no other example like it.

[FOREBODING MUSIC]

So on paper, 1948 and 2024 have just a tremendous amount of economic similarity.

Yeah. And I think that one thing that I think is charming about the example is that the source of this weird set of economic conditions was sort of fundamentally similar. Both the end of the pandemic and the end of the war economy brought these disruptions that led to the distortions in prices, led to the distortions in the housing market, and left Americans feeling strangely dissatisfied, even though by other measures, like unemployment or growth, things look pretty good.

And at the time, Harry Truman was president. He was a Democrat. He took over after the death of FDR in 1945. And in large part because of prices and the economy, Harry Truman’s popularity collapsed. He started out with a 90 percent approval rating after World War II. But by the early part of his election year in 1948, his approval rating was all the way down to 36 percent.

Wow. Not unlike — correct me if I’m wrong, you’re the polling expert — President Biden today.

That’s right. It’s very similar. Joe Biden’s approval rating right now is in the upper 30s. So that’s right next to where Harry Truman was at the time. It’s worth dwelling on just how remarkable the public’s dissatisfaction with the economy was. I mean, we think of the postwar era as being the dawn of this really prosperous time for Americans, which in retrospect, it certainly was.

But Americans were so pessimistic about the economy. They thought a depression was likely. And more than 70 percent of Americans said they wanted their own wages to go down if that’s what it would take in order to bring down prices.

Wow. OK, so weird postwar economy, highly dissatisfied public, and you mentioned this was an election year. So Truman, politically speaking, is in real trouble.

Yeah, deep trouble. The Democratic coalition was falling apart. He’s seen as way in over his head. And to take one high profile example, the “New Republic,” then a very prominent liberal magazine, argued that he should just leave the race altogether and not even run for re-election. But of course, he doesn’t leave the race. He’s left facing an opponent, in Republican Thomas Dewey, who he seems very likely to lose to. He’s trailing in the polls. He’s in a lot of trouble heading right up to the election.

So amid this toxic economic feeling moment that seems so lethal for Truman, what happens?

Well, things start to turn around. The economy stages a big comeback. Inflation plummets. Inflation is at 10 percent in January 1948, and it falls in half by October. And voters perceived that. They reported to pollsters that they expected prices to rise when it was the summer. And by the time the election came around, they weren’t expecting additional price increases.

And with that economic backdrop, Truman runs one of the most famous campaigns in American political history.

Let’s take a look at the record of the 80th Congress they’re so proud of. I call it the notorious Do Nothing Republican 80th Congress.

You may remember from your US history class that he runs against the Do Nothing Congress.

The thing that Congress wasn’t doing was taking action to control prices.

That’s the true story of why prices are so high.

So he runs a populist campaign to try and argue that the Republicans aren’t standing up for working people. And despite all of that, Truman still trails in the polls to his rival, the Republican Thomas Dewey, all the way up until the end.

Governor Thomas E. Dewey, proclaimed as the overwhelming favorite, records his own vote with calm confidence.

The expectation that Dewey is going to win is so strong that there are even newspapers printed before the election is over that say, “Dewey Defeats Truman.” But in the end —

Through the day and far into the night, the results come in state by state, until the news that confounded the experts and the prophets, Truman wins.

Harry Truman wins in what’s arguably the most famous comeback in American political history.

So Nate, how much is President Biden on this kind of a Truman economic improvement, political fortune revival path or not?

Economically, I think there’s a really good case that Biden is on the Truman path, or even ahead of schedule. Inflation has been steadily declining already over the last year. As I just mentioned a moment ago, inflation was still at 10 percent in January 1948. And inflation today is already down under 4 percent and may still be expected to fall heading into the election.

And there are already signs that voters are beginning to respond to the positive economic news. We just got new consumer confidence data over the last few days, and it shows that consumer sentiment has risen to the highest levels since 2021, which is, of course, the year that post-pandemic inflation really began to set in.

And it also happens to be the last time Joe Biden’s approval rating was over 50 percent. And importantly, Americans expect that inflation is going to continue to decline. So there’s this sort of sense that maybe we’ve gotten through the toughest part here, and brighter days are ahead.

And these gains in consumer sentiment are broad. It’s up across every age group, every income group, and every educational group. So those are very positive signs for Joe Biden if he wanted to try and pull off something like what Harry Truman was able to pull off in ‘48.

So this very much does seem to be a largely analogous trajectory, economically speaking. 1948, 2024, Democrat Harry Truman, Democrat Joe Biden.

Yeah, absolutely. I mean, that doesn’t mean they’re the exact same election. There are all kinds of differences. Truman had to overcome challenges that Biden won’t have to overcome. Biden will have to overcome challenges that Harry Truman didn’t have to overcome.

And one of the biggest differences here is that Joe Biden owns the blame for inflation in a way that Harry Truman didn’t.

Well, as I mentioned, Harry Truman was able to blame Congress. He said he had the solution to inflation in a way that Joe Biden simply can’t say today.

But one of the biggest differences, and what may prevent history from repeating itself today, is that the economy just is not nearly as powerful as it once was in shaping electoral outcomes. And so even if Biden is able to replicate Truman’s exact same economic fortune, it may not be enough for him to win re-election.

[SUSPENSEFUL MUSIC]

We’ll be right back.

Nate, you just said that a major difference between 1948 and now, 2024, and whether or not Biden is or is not Truman in this election, has a lot to do with the economy. And you suggested that it’s not as powerful a force in elections as it had been in the past. And that’s surprising. I mean, everything we have been told as political journalists and as Americans is that it’s the economy, stupid. Right? The economy is decisive in elections. So you’re just going to have to explain yourself.

Well, the economy is absolutely a huge factor in shaping our elections still. But it’s not the only thing that matters. And over time, there have been more and more signs that the economy has become a little less important in shaping the outcome of our elections.

And what are those signs?

Well, one easy sign that I think we can all see in our everyday lives is the approval ratings of our presidents. Take Donald Trump. Donald Trump presided over an excellent economy, an economy that apparently is so good that many voters are yearning for it again today. But his approval ratings were never over 50 percent.

There’s nothing like that in the longer-term historic record. Right? That’s something that’s very different that we see today that we haven’t seen in the past. And it’s a sign that there are other things that are shaping political opinion about the president that just didn’t exist decades ago.

Now, some of that could be about the specifics of Donald Trump, or Joe Biden, or Barack Obama. But when it happens now for three straight presidents, that’s when you start to wonder whether it’s not really about anything about them but something deeper happening in American politics.

I just want to be clear. So over the last three presidencies — Biden, Trump, Obama — you’re seeing more and more of a disconnect between the health of the economy and the president’s approval ratings, which used to be a lot more of a kind of one-to-one relationship. Economy was good, approval ratings good. Economy was bad, approval ratings bad. You’re saying that relationship has kind of ruptured a little bit.

It’s not just ruptured. It’s almost gone over the last three presidents.

Well, why is that? I mean, what explains why this economic relationship to presidential approval ratings is evaporating?

Well, in a certain sense, the answer is obvious. You know, it’s that we live in a more polarized country that’s deeply divided on a pretty long set of ideologically-charged issues that voters care a lot about. Going back to the example about Donald Trump, I don’t think that our listeners should have any difficulty imagining all of the reasons why voters disapproved of Donald Trump, even though the economy was good.

There were his views on immigration. There was his conduct in office. There’s also just the general backdrop of a deeply polarized country where there are far fewer persuadable voters.

There are things like this for Joe Biden as well. There are voters who have a lot of skepticism about his age. There are people who are concerned about his stance on Israel. There are people who are concerned about immigration and the border. There’s a lot of different reasons why voters can disapprove of Joe Biden, even though they think that the economy is pretty decent.

And indeed, in 1948, for what it’s worth, Harry Truman had a lot of issues like this. Civil rights was becoming an issue in 1948. The first Israeli-Arab War and Israel’s existence was also in 1948. But the number of voters who care about these issues and now vote on them is much higher than it used to be.

Hmm. In a polarized America, where perhaps a more and more nationalized and partisan media exists, what you’re describing is an environment in which non-economic issues become more central to people’s identity, more central to how they vote.

Yeah. And it’s worth thinking about a sociological element here, too, which is that Americans are much more affluent and highly-educated than they were in 1948. Back in 1948, fewer than 10 percent of Americans had graduated college. And most people didn’t have deeply informed views on these kind of arcane social issues. They might have had some view, but it wasn’t nearly as important to them as getting their weekly paycheck and providing a basic standard of living for their families.

And today, in 2024, more than 40 percent of voters will come from households making more than $100,000 a year. This combination of material affluence and high education creates a set of conditions where voters have the privilege, as people like to say —

The luxury, right.

The luxury of voting on non-economic issues and the knowledge of the issues that would allow them to care about them, to treat politics like a sport and to value these kind of ideological questions more than they would have in the past.

OK. So who, in 2024, given everything you just explained, does the economy matter to most?

Well, everyone cares about the economy a little bit, right? But not everyone has the luxury to care about other issues. And not everyone has deeply well-informed views of those other issues, like abortion or the border and so on. And the people who care about the economy but don’t have the same kind of ideological politics tend to be working class. It’s not that there’s no one who’s working class that cares about these things, of course. And it’s not that everyone who’s highly educated and rich cares about abortion. But you’re much more likely to be persuadable on the economy if you have lower educational attainment and you have lower levels of income.

OK. So you’re saying unlike, presumably, in 1948, today that there are just fewer voters who are persuadable based on economic issues alone or primarily. And the ones who are tend to be lower income and have lower education levels. So I guess the question is, are those voters even really available to President Biden because we tend to think of them as Trump voters? Is that understanding correct?

Yeah, that’s absolutely right. I mean, Donald Trump’s political strength is among working class voters and then on the economic issue in particular. He’s always had an advantage over Joe Biden on who would handle the economy best. And we haven’t said this explicitly, but it’s worth noting that there are a lot of polls showing Joe Biden really weak among low income voters.

And that shouldn’t be too much of a surprise given his poor economic ratings and the basic theory of modern politics that I’ve outlined to you. But Democrats usually do best among low income voters. So if the economy turns around, you’re hoping, if you’re Joe Biden, that you start to do better among those low income, traditionally Democratic voters, the sort of people who voted for Harry Truman in 1948, who were voting for the Democrats because they thought the Democrats were the party of the working class and were good for their material interests.

Got it. So you’re saying, yes, these voters have tended to vote for Trump in the past, but that’s not set in stone. They are potentially persuadable. And in fact, an improving economy could bring them into Joe Biden’s camp.

That’s right. An improving economy could change the math here. The risk for Donald Trump is pretty serious. If the economy becomes less important to voters, then his biggest advantage goes away among the group he usually counts on in order to win elections. Donald Trump’s going to win voters without a college degree no matter what happens. Right?

I’m not saying that Joe Biden’s going to go and win the white working class or something like that. But whether Donald Trump can generate huge margins among that group, whether he can keep gaining among that group, that’s what keeps him in the game. That’s what gives him a chance to win the election.

What I think is interesting is we’re seeing an awareness already from Trump that this is a problem for him. The other day, he said something about how some of the recent gains in the stock market we’ve seen can actually be attributed to the polls showing him in the lead. That’s the sort of thing you say when you know the economy is really important to you and you want to make sure that, if it is improving, Joe Biden doesn’t get credit for it.

Right. I think what he said specifically was that the rising stock market was a Trump stock market because it was a stock market reacting to the assumption that he would win, which felt like a little bit of a stretch. But what you’re saying that is a sign that Trump recognizes that a kind of rising economic fortune for Biden is bad for him. And he needs to come up with some sort of plan to do something about it. And that’s a struggle.

Yeah. I mean, it’s almost better than any consumer sentiment poll that we’ve got. Right? I mean, if Donald Trump knows that he can’t pretend like the economy is bad, that says something about how credible he thinks that side of the argument is.

Fascinating. So really, just to return to our 1948 example for a moment, the difference with today is the scale of voters who may be persuaded based on economic conditions. In 1948, a whole lot of voters felt much happier by the time the election rolled around, and so that may well have convinced a lot of them to re-elect Harry Truman and swayed the election in his favor.

Today, that number of people who can be persuaded by the economy alone is a lot smaller, as you’ve explained. But both candidates would still love to have their support, especially in a close race, which we expect to have.

So what we’re likely to see now, if the economy keeps improving, is a pretty robust fight — and I guess we’re already starting to see it — over who should get the credit for it, Biden or Trump.

Yeah, I think we could see something like that. But look, Biden is likely going to get the credit for an improving economy, not Trump. Biden’s the president. Trump can try and spin the stock market all day. But that’s going to be a tough sell for the American people.

I think that, if you’re Biden, if the economy continues to improve, that’s probably going to help him to some extent or another. It could even be the foundation for his re-election.

But remember we’re talking about a persuadable group of voters, not single-issue voters. We can’t assume that, just because the economy improves, it means Biden’s going to win.

There are other issues that can sway these voters — the border, Biden’s age, the war in Israel, or something else. It’s not so simple as to say that their vote will be dictated exclusively by the economy. But I think it’s fair to say that, with all of the huge issues that loom over the country today and how polarized our country is, that an improving economy may not be the same kind of wind in Joe Biden’s sales that it was for Harry Truman in 1948.

[UPBEAT MUSIC]

We’ll, Nate, thank you very much for the history lesson and the analysis. We appreciate it.

Thanks for having me.

Here’s what else you need to know today. Over the weekend, the United States and its allies carried out a barrage of attacks on Iranian forces and the militias they support. The strikes began on Friday, targeting sites in Syria and Iraq in response to attacks that killed three American soldiers in Jordan and injured at least 40 more US troops.

The attacks continued on Saturday and Sunday, with US strikes against dozens of targets in Yemen controlled by the Iranian-backed Houthi militia, which has continued to threaten global shipping in the Red Sea. While the United States says that it is not looking to widen the war in the Middle East, the strikes over the past three days represent a clear escalation that American officials said was far from over.

I don’t have anything to share with you today on precisely who was taken out in those strikes. But I would just say that the president was clear when he ordered them and when he conducted them that was the beginning of our response, and there will be more steps to come.

And in the first Democratic presidential primary, President Biden thoroughly dominated his rivals in South Carolina, winning more than 96 percent of the vote. Biden’s campaign team was especially interested in the turnout of Black voters, who polls show are less enthusiastic about him than in the past. Biden’s aides said that early data from Saturday’s primary showed that the share of Black voters in South Carolina was 13 percent higher than in 2020.

Today’s episode was produced by Alex Stern, Mooj Zadie, Clare Toeniskoetter, and Mary Wilson. It was edited by Devin Taylor, with help from Patricia Willens, was fact-checked by Susan Lee, contains original music by Rowan Niemisto and Marion Lozano, and was engineered by Chris Wood. Our theme music is by Jim Brunberg and Ben Landsverk of Wonderly.

That’s it for “The Daily.” I’m Michael Barbaro. See you tomorrow.

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Featuring Nate Cohn

Produced by Alex Stern ,  Mooj Zadie ,  Clare Toeniskoetter and Mary Wilson

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Original music by Rowan Niemisto and Marion Lozano

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Listen and follow The Daily Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Amazon Music

President Biden has struggled to sell Americans on the positive signs in the economy under his watch, despite figures that look good on paper. That could have important ramifications for his re-election hopes.

Nate Cohn, the chief political analyst for The Times, explains why, to understand the situation, it may help to look back at another election, 76 years ago.

On today’s episode

law courts tour

Nate Cohn , the chief political analyst for The New York Times.

Images of Harry Truman and Joe Biden are side by side.

Background reading

Want to Understand 2024? Look at 1948 .

The Economy Looks Sunny, a Potential Gain for Biden .

There are a lot of ways to listen to The Daily. Here’s how.

We aim to make transcripts available the next workday after an episode’s publication. You can find them at the top of the page.

Fact-checking by Susan Lee .

The Daily is made by Rachel Quester, Lynsea Garrison, Clare Toeniskoetter, Paige Cowett, Michael Simon Johnson, Brad Fisher, Chris Wood, Jessica Cheung, Stella Tan, Alexandra Leigh Young, Lisa Chow, Eric Krupke, Marc Georges, Luke Vander Ploeg, M.J. Davis Lin, Dan Powell, Sydney Harper, Mike Benoist, Liz O. Baylen, Asthaa Chaturvedi, Rachelle Bonja, Diana Nguyen, Marion Lozano, Corey Schreppel, Rob Szypko, Elisheba Ittoop, Mooj Zadie, Patricia Willens, Rowan Niemisto, Jody Becker, Rikki Novetsky, John Ketchum, Nina Feldman, Will Reid, Carlos Prieto, Ben Calhoun, Susan Lee, Lexie Diao, Mary Wilson, Alex Stern, Dan Farrell, Sophia Lanman, Shannon Lin, Diane Wong, Devon Taylor, Alyssa Moxley, Summer Thomad, Olivia Natt, Daniel Ramirez and Brendan Klinkenberg.

Our theme music is by Jim Brunberg and Ben Landsverk of Wonderly. Special thanks to Sam Dolnick, Paula Szuchman, Lisa Tobin, Larissa Anderson, Julia Simon, Sofia Milan, Mahima Chablani, Elizabeth Davis-Moorer, Jeffrey Miranda, Renan Borelli, Maddy Masiello, Isabella Anderson and Nina Lassam.

Nate Cohn is The Times’s chief political analyst. He covers elections, public opinion, demographics and polling. More about Nate Cohn

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Belfast rappers Kneecap to sue British government over decision to ‘block’ tour funding award

Hip hop group claims decision to veto funding is attempt to ‘silence’ them.

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Kneecap, who sought the support for costs related to touring and live stage production in North America, conclude their statement with the message 'fight censorship'. Photograph: Tom Honan

The Belfast rap trio Kneecap have engaged lawyers to challenge a decision by the UK government to block a British Phonographic Industry (BPI) funding award.

The band accused the UK government of trying to “silence” them after it blocked the funding.

Phoenix Law in Belfast said it had been instructed by Kneecap to challenge the recent decision.

“On December 4th, 2023, our clients applied in their capacity as artists, for a grant under the Music Export Growth Scheme. Their application was shortlisted and approved by the panel,” their legal letter states.

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Spider: ‘I want to be the biggest rock star in the world’

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How Pat Sheedy used fraud to fund his gambling addiction: ‘I was convincing. I could make you feel sorry for me’

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“Thereafter, the minister for the department of business and trade took a decision to refuse the request for funding on the premise that our clients were ‘people that oppose the United Kingdom’. It is this decision to which is the subject of this proposed judicial review,” it says.

It was asserted that this decision was “unlawful and ought to be quashed”. Darragh Mackin is representing the group, with barristers Joe Brolly and Ronan Lavery instructed to pursue the case.

[  Belfast rappers Kneecap accuse UK government of trying to ‘silence’ them by blocking funding  ]

The funding decision placed the group at the centre of a controversy around freedom of artistic expression and arts funding.

A British government spokesperson said it was “hardly surprising” it had stopped the award given the group’s political opposition to the United Kingdom.

The funding, an award under the Music Export Growth Scheme (MEGS) to support the expansion of bands in global markets, had been signed off on by the BPI’s independent selection board.

The band alleges that a provocative 2019 tour poster is to blame, saying: “We’re told that our 2019 Farewell to the Union poster p*ssed off the Tories. Once again the British government is trying to silence voices from West Belfast – once again it will fail!”

The band, who sought the support for costs related to touring and live stage production in North America, concluded their statement with the message “fight censorship”, and congratulated the artists who received funding under the scheme.

The scheme is funded by the department for business and trade (DBT), the department for culture, media and sport (DCMS), with investment from the UK recorded music industry.

[  First Look: Kneecap the movie – Sundance has never seen anything like this immersion in acidic Northern humour  ]

SDLP leader Colum Eastwood submitted questions to business and trade secretary Kemi Badenoch following her decision to defund the rap artists.

“It is highly irregular for a secretary of state to intervene to overturn the decision of an independent assessment board to award funding to an artist on the basis of their political aspirations,” Mr Eastwood said.

“It would be unacceptable if the British government had instituted a policy of defunding groups because they support Irish unity, Scottish independence, Welsh independence or any other change to the constitutional status quo,” he said.

[  Kneecap in Dublin: It’s not rage that the punk-rap three-piece conjure. It’s joy  ]

“Worse, in the context of Northern Ireland, it may represent a breach of the British government’s obligations under the treaty signed after the Good Friday [Belfast] Agreement which includes a commitment to exercise power on the basis of parity of esteem between communities in the North.”

Art is “meant to be challenging”, Mr Eastwood added, and it was not necessary to “agree with an artist or group to understand the importance of funding creators who challenge the status quo and the establishment”.

The BPI has also expressed its “disappointment” at the decision.

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Case: Disability Discrimination/Failure to Accommodate (M.D. Fla.)

PGA Tour, Inc.’s motion to dismiss the failure to accommodate claims under the Americans with Disabilities Act and the Florida Civil Rights Act of 1992 of a former employee refusing a Covid vaccination and alternate safety measures was denied, a federal district court ruled, because wrongful termination claims aren’t separate, she exhausted her administrative remedies regarding alleged religious discrimination, and her firing logically connects to the alleged failure to accommodate claims.

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Atlanta DA admits to a relationship with Trump case prosecutor but defends her actions

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Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis speaks in Atlanta on Aug. 14, 2023, after former President Donald Trump and his allies were indicted on state charges. At right is special prosecutor Nathan Wade. A personal relationship between Willis and Wade is at the center of misconduct claims against the DA's office. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis speaks in Atlanta on Aug. 14, 2023, after former President Donald Trump and his allies were indicted on state charges. At right is special prosecutor Nathan Wade. A personal relationship between Willis and Wade is at the center of misconduct claims against the DA's office.

ATLANTA — Fulton County District Attorney Fani Willis is strongly pushing back against claims she violated federal law and ethical standards by having a personal relationship with a lead prosecutor on the 2020 election interference case against former President Donald Trump and others.

In a court filing Friday , Willis said the relationship with Nathan Wade, who was hired to work the case in 2021, did not begin until 2022 and allegations that the pair financially benefit from prosecuting the case are "meritless."

The filing asks a judge to deny a Trump codefendant's motion last month to dismiss charges.

"To be absolutely clear, the personal relationship between Special Prosecutor Wade and District Attorney Willis has never involved direct or indirect financial benefit to District Attorney Willis," the filing reads. "Defendants have produced no evidence to suggest that there is any circumstance that would constitute a financial incentive on the District Attorney's part to pursue a conviction in this case through the appointment of Special Prosecutor Wade."

According to the Jan. 8 motion , Wade has been paid more than $600,000 since 2021 for his work on the case, which primarily included overseeing a months-long special purpose grand jury process behind closed doors that investigated the failed attempt to overturn Georgia's 2020 presidential results by Trump and his allies.

The allegations of a romantic relationship between Willis and Wade were filed by former Trump campaign official Mike Roman as part of a motion to dismiss charges against him and remove the DA's office from any involvement with the case.

Lawyers for Trump and fellow codefendant Bob Cheeley have since also joined on to the request. Trump, Cheeley and Roman have pleaded not guilty to the charges against them.

Judges push back against Trump's immunity claim in the election interference case

Judges push back against Trump's immunity claim in the federal election interference case

Roman's charges include racketeering, and the motion to dismiss them argues that Willis and Wade themselves violated federal racketeering law and financially benefit from prosecuting Trump and his allies because of their relationship.

The motion also argued that Wade failed to file his oath of office before working on the case and that his hiring was never approved by county commissioners, nullifying the felony charges stemming from Roman's involvement in a scheme to send a falsified slate of presidential electors to Congress.

Friday's filing rebuts those claims. A hearing over the matter is scheduled for Feb. 15.

Plane tickets as alleged evidence

The political and optical implications of the allegations — and Willis' lack of response until now — have dominated recent headlines surrounding an already-high-profile case against the former president.

Much of the initial 127-page motion written by Ashleigh Merchant, Roman's attorney, contained innuendo and implications of wrongdoing by Willis and Wade without accompanying evidence, citing "sources" that confirmed a relationship and speculating about why Wade was hired.

Willis defended his qualifications, including in Friday's response several awards and honors Wade received and a purported screenshot of a social media post in which Merchant previously campaigned for Wade in a prior run for office.

Roman's filing also said that Wade's divorce proceedings, then filed under seal, would provide corroborating evidence about the alleged relationship, in addition to financial records that showed Wade and Willis traveled together at different times.

Credit card statements released in the divorce case show two plane tickets, one to Miami and one to San Francisco, that Wade purchased for himself and in Willis' name.

The DA said that "expenses for personal travel were roughly divided equally between us."

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Fulton County special prosecutor Nathan Wade speaks during a hearing in the 2020 Georgia election interference case on Dec. 1, 2023. John David Mercer/Pool/Getty Images hide caption

Wade's divorce docket, unsealed last week, did not show any further evidence of the relationship with the district attorney, but does show a bitter fight over money and financial statements with Jocelyn Wade, his estranged wife, who said in court documents she is unemployed.

Attacks on Willis and the case continue

Even if a judge does not dismiss the charges or remove Willis from the case, the allegations against her have set off the latest attack on Willis and the case.

Steve Sadow, one of Trump's lawyers in Georgia, initially declined to sign on to the motion against Willis, calling the filing "salacious and scandalous in nature" at a recent hearing.

But after Willis used an appearance at a Martin Luther King Jr. church service in January to suggest criticism of Wade came because he was Black, Sadow and co-counsel Jennifer Little joined in on the motion to dismiss and blasted Willis' remarks.

"[T]he DA's self-serving comments came with the added, sought after, benefit of garnering racially based sympathy for her self-inflicted quagmire," they wrote in a motion last week.

Willis replied that Trump's motion "appears designed to generate media attention rather than accomplish some form of legitimate legal practice" and should be dismissed.

On Friday, Sadow wrote in a statement that Willis' new "response asks the Court to turn a blind eye to her alleged personal and financial misconduct."

Trump himself has seized on the allegations as the latest opportunity to bash the case and has called Willis "totally compromised."

It's not the first time the former president or his allies have attacked Willis and sought to discredit the charges and derail the investigation into the failed effort to overturn Georgia's 2020 election results.

House Judiciary Chair Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, has sent several letters to Willis as part of an investigation into alleged "collusion" between Fulton County and the House committee that investigated the Jan. 6 insurrection at the U.S. Capitol.

On Friday, Jordan subpoenaed Willis for documents related to a firing of a staffer after it was alleged that she misused federal grant money. Willis on Friday said those allegations are "false."

Georgia's Republican-led state Senate, home to many lawmakers who aided Trump's election meddling efforts, recently approved a special committee to investigate Willis that has little power to act against her but may seek to subpoena testimony seeking to derail the case.

With reporting by WABE's Sam Gringlas

Latest on Oklahoma tribal tags tickets: Some tickets dropped, but bigger questions remain

Dozens of Oklahoma tribes issue license plates to citizens, including the Citizen Potawatomi Nation in Shawnee.

At least two traffic citations issued by the Oklahoma Highway Patrol to drivers whose cars carried tribal license plates have been quietly dropped, court records obtained by The Oklahoman show.

One of the tickets was dismissed Monday by a Garfield County judge, and the second was never filed in court. It was the latter citation, written to driver Crystal Deroin, that sent shock waves across the state after she posted a copy of her ticket on social media. She had valid plates issued by the Otoe-Missouria Tribe, but a trooper cited her because she lived outside of the northern Oklahoma tribe's jurisdiction.

Her $249 citation triggered questions statewide about how often troopers were writing similar tickets to tribal citizens with valid plates — and why troopers had suddenly started to focus on tribal jurisdiction.

Neither Deroin nor the second driver whose ticket was dropped could be reached by The Oklahoman to discuss how their cases were handled. The district attorney's office also did not return a message left for comment.

More: Why was a driver issued a ticket for a tribal tag? What we know about the ticket, Oklahoma law, and what's changed

Prep for the polls: See who is running for president and compare where they stand on key issues in our Voter Guide

But Deroin told KOCO-TV that she plans to keep her Otoe-Missouria tag and advocate for other drivers in similar situations.

"I hope our leaders can figure this out pretty soon, because it affects not just Otoe but the 38 other tribes, as well," Deroin told the TV station. "This is not the end. This is the end of today, but we still have tomorrow, and I still have to drive home."

Tribal leaders are still seeking a solution with the state over tribal tags

John Shotton, the chairman of the Otoe-Missouria Tribe, said he and other tribal leaders are continuing to work on the issue, but did not disclose any specifics. "Until we reach a resolution, we will support our Otoe-Missouria citizens that get caught in the crossfire of this controversy,” Shotton said in a written statement.

Shotton previously said Deroin's ticket came as a shock, and leaders of many other tribes echoed his remarks. They all said the state police have long recognized tribal plates as valid regardless of where a tribal citizen lives in Oklahoma.

More: Most tribes provide vehicle and license plate data to Oklahoma, state records show

But Gov. Kevin Stitt and the Oklahoma Department of Public Safety, which he oversees, said troopers were enforcing a 1990s Supreme Court ruling and checking whether vehicles with tribal tags were “garaged” within that tribe’s jurisdiction. Stitt said troopers were simply enforcing existing law.

Attorney General Gentner Drummond took a more moderate tone, saying a compact between tribes and the state would be the best way to solve the problem.

“The Attorney General’s highest priority is public safety, and he believes the compacting process is the ideal avenue to address these concerns," Drummond's spokesman, Phil Bacharach, said in an emailed statement to The Oklahoman in November.

More: Oklahoma lawmakers told state police to work out tag agreement with tribes — 12 years ago

Tuesday, Bacharach declined to comment about the news that some of the tickets had been dismissed.

Stitt's office said it was not involved in the dismissals. "Our office had no part in the dismissal nor were we aware of the dismissal prior to today," deputy press secretary Meyer Siegfried wrote in an email.

Echoing the governor's office, a spokesman for the Oklahoma Department of Public Safety said the agency was unaware the ticket had been dismissed. "DPS did not request that this case be dismissed. And if it has been, we were not advised that it was," agency spokesman Sarah Stewart said in an email late Tuesday.

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EHART V. LAHAINA DIVERS, INC., No. 22-16149 (9th Cir. 2024)

In this case heard by the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, the plaintiff's wife died during a scuba and snorkeling tour from Lahaina Harbor to Molokini Crater, an atoll off the coast of Maui, Hawaii. Before the tour, the plaintiff and his wife each signed a waiver document releasing their rights to sue the defendants. The plaintiff's claims were based on gross negligence and simple negligence. The defendants argued that the waiver and release were an affirmative defense to the claims based on simple negligence. However, the district court struck the defense, stating that the liability waivers were void under 46 U.S.C. § 30527(a), which prohibits certain liability waivers for vessels transporting passengers between ports in the United States or between a port in the United States and a port in a foreign country. The Ninth Circuit reversed the district court's order and held that the term "between ports in the United States" in 46 U.S.C. § 30527(a) refers to transportation between at least two separate ports in the United States. Therefore, the statute does not apply to vessels that transport passengers away from and back to a single port without stopping at any other port. The Court remanded the case for further proceedings.

Court Description: Admiralty Law. The panel reversed the district court’s order granting plaintiff’s motion to strike an affirmative defense of waiver or release and remanded for further proceedings in a wrongful death admiralty action. Plaintiff’s claims arose from his wife’s death during a scuba and snorkeling tour from Lahaina Harbor to Molokini Crater, an atoll off the coast of Maui. Before the tour, plaintiff and his wife each signed a waiver document releasing rights to sue defendants. Defendants asserted waiver and release as an affirmative defense to claims based on simple negligence. The district court struck the defense on the basis that the liability waivers were void under 46 U.S.C. § 30527(a), which prohibits certain liability waivers regarding “vessel[s] transporting passengers between ports in the United States, or between a port in the United States and a port in a foreign country.” Citing Wallis v. Princess Cruises, Inc., 306 F.3d 827 (9th Cir. 2002) (finding jurisdiction to review the district court’s grant of partial summary judgment limiting the defendant’s liability in accordance with a clause on the back of a cruise ship ticket), the panel held that it had jurisdiction to review the district court’s interlocutory order under 28 U.S.C. § 1292(a)(3) because the order determined the rights and liabilities of parties in an admiralty case. On the merits, the panel held that, under the plain meaning of “between ports in the United States,” § 30527(a) does not apply to liability waivers as to vessels that transport passengers away from and back to a single port without stopping at any other port. Dissenting, Judge Collins wrote that he would dismiss the appeal for lack of jurisdiction because the majority greatly expanded the court’s already overbroad construction of 28 U.S.C. § 1292(a)(3). He would hold that Wallis is distinguishable because there, the district court imposed an across-the-board limitation on the defendants’ liability. Judge Collins also disagreed with the majority’s interpretation of 46 U.S.C. § 30527(a).

Some case metadata and case summaries were written with the help of AI, which can produce inaccuracies. You should read the full case before relying on it for legal research purposes.

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