The U.K. Has Given Ukraine the Storm Shadow: A Western Missile on a Soviet Warbird

Russian forces in Crimea better watch out.

an raf tornado gr4 aircraft carrying two storm shadow missiles under the fuselagethis long range air launched and conventionally armed missile equips raf tornado gr4 squadrons and saw operational service in 2003 with 617 squadron during combat in iraq, prior to entering full service in 2004 post deployment analysis demonstrated the missiles exceptional accuracy, and the effect on targets was described as devastating based on this performance, it is arguably the most advanced weapon of its kind in the worldfeasibility studies on a possible uk requirement for a long range stand off missile were originally commissioned in 1982, and work was eventually subsumed in 1986 into the nato seven nation modular stand off weapon programme this project was however aborted, and the uk subsequently withdrew with the end of the cold war the uk’s continued need for a stand off requirement was reviewed and endorsed as part of the ‘options for change’ exercise an international competition was launched in 1994 to meet the uk’s conventionally armed stand off missile casom requirement, and seven companies responded

Despite extensive military assistance to Ukraine, transfers of two types of military hardware have remained taboo for Ukraine’s allies: modern Western-designed jet fighters, and long range land-attack missiles.

It’s unclear whether Ukraine has received fully capable Storm Shadows, or a reduced range model so as to adhere to the MTCR arms control regime, which ordinarily discouraged export of missiles with a range exceeding 190 miles.

While not fast like Russia’s Kinzhal aerial ballistic missile , the five-meter-long Storm Shadow is noted for its high degree of stealth, AI-driven image-matching terminal guidance system, and bunker-busting two-stage warhead (as further detailed below). Because it’s entirely pre-programmed for its targets prior to takeoff, it should be easier to integrate onto Ukraine’s Soviet warplanes than other advanced Western guided weapons.

Western governments feared Ukraine might use long-range missiles for attacks on Russian soil deemed politically provocative, which could incite escalatory retaliation. That, along with limited inventory, has most notably kept the U.S. from donating 190-mile range ATACMS ballistic missiles that are ordinarily compatible with the HIMARS and M270 rocket artillery systems donated to Ukraine.

Wallace stated that the Storm Shadows were supplied with assurances from Ukraine that they would only be used for strikes on Russian-occupied parts of the country, such as logistical centers in Starobilsk and Melitopol.

But the real bullseye falls on Russia’s extensive military infrastructure on the Crimean Peninsula, including airbases and much of Russia’s Black Sea Fleet. Russia had leased bases in that area from Ukraine for two decades, only for Putin to invade the entire peninsula in 2014.

The politics of Donated Missiles

Given that the donation from the UK sounds like it was in limited quantity (“a number”), the UK’s Storm Shadow may effectively be more a political play than a military one, much like when the country donated Western-designed main battle tanks.

Though the latter quantity was relatively small— 14 Challenger 2 tanks —it may have helped end hesitation for much larger subsequent donations of Leopard 2 and M1 tanks from the U.S. and continental Europe. The UK has been less concerned by the ‘but how will Putin react?’ factor than France or Germany.

Fortunately for Ukraine, Storm Shadow donations are more likely to be scalable than the UK’s rare Challenger 2 tanks, as the missiles are also in France’s inventory—under the designation SCALP-EG—and Italy’s. Both are major donors to Ukraine. The French Navy also uses a longer-range ship-launched variant called the MdCn.

Western governments might see whether Middle Eastern Storm Shadow clients (Egypt, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the UAE) are amenable to quietly selling back missiles in exchange for newly-built replacements later. Those sold to the Middle East are believed to be a downgraded variant with 180-mile range sometimes dubbed the Black Shaheen—still potentially useful for Ukraine’s purposes.

britain aviation show aerospace manufacturing

Origins of Storm Shadow

Not to be confused with the G.I. Joe villain of the same name, Storm Shadow/SCALP is a French-U.K. joint venture built by European missile-maker MBDA and based on the Apache runway-cratering missile. It and Germany’s KEPD-350 air-launched cruise missile are the most numerous European-built equivalents to the U.S.’s arsenal of Tomahawk land-attack missiles , which have much longer range and are primarily (but not exclusively) sea-launched.

Storm Shadow doesn’t use any input from the carrying aircraft before or after launch. Instead, it’s pre-programmed on the ground to follow waypoints to the target area autonomously using inertial and GPS navigation—usually skimming at just 100-130 feet above the ground to further reduce radar detectability. Supported by pop-out wings, it flies just below the speed of sound powered by small TRI 60-30 turbojet engine and boasts a low radar-cross section due to its non-reflective geometry.

Once near the target, the missile lunges upwards–tossing off its pointy nose cone and exposing the infrared sensor within—and uses its elevated vantage to scan the ground below, searching for anything that resembles preloaded satellite images of the target using an early AI-driven technology called DSMAC (Digital Scene Matching Area Correlator.)

If the missile can’t find the target, it can be assigned a crash point so as not to risk collateral damage. But on finding a match, it swoops down and, just before impact, discharges the pre-cursor charge of its nearly half-ton (992-pound) BROACH warhead.

The armor-penetrating precursor blasts a hole into the target’s surface, allowing the larger main charge to pass inside the targeted structure before detonating—making BROACH effective against hardened targets like underground storage facilities and bunkers.

And while a Storm Shadow can go further and has a much larger warhead than a GMRL rocket, it’s also 4-5 times more expensive, so Ukraine will receive a far smaller number. That means each shot will have to count, and there won’t be an indefinite resupply of missiles, making avoiding interception even more pertinent.

Storm Shadow was first used in combat during the 2003 invasion of Iraq by now-retired British Tornado jets. France’s SCALP-EG missiles followed in 2011, deployed by Mirage 2000Ds and carrier-based Rafale-M jets in the campaign to overthrow Qaddafi in Libya. In the mid-2010s, the UK and France also employed the missiles against ISIS in Iraq and Syria, and in strikes punishing the Syrian government for its use of chemical weapons.

Western Missiles on Soviet Warbirds

Storm Shadow/SCALP is designed to be lofted from aircraft, and has been integrated into Sweden’s JAS-39 Gripen fighter , France’s Mirage 2000 and newer Rafale fighters , and Tornado jets and newer Eurofighter Typhoons built by Germany, Italy, and the United Kingdom.

But because Storm Shadows don’t require fire control instructions from the launching fighter, they should be comparatively easy to add onto the Ukrainian Air Force’s Soviet warplanes.

Ukraine has already managed to mount AGM-88 HARM anti-radar missiles on its MiG-29 jets , a modification likely enabled by the fact the HARM has a built-in seeker. Due to Storm Shadow’s considerable size and weight, it may seek to mount it on large-but-fast Su-24 Fencer bombers or Su-27 fighters.

ukrainian mig 29 firing agm 88 harm missile

Due to Storm Shadow’s considerable range, Ukrainian jets could release the missile from relatively safe airspace. That said, to delay/avoid detection by Russian ground-based radars and attack from an unpredictable angle, Ukraine may opt for launch from low altitude—even if that reduces the maximum range and requires getting closer. There may therefore still be some need to dodge patrolling Russian MiG-31 interceptors , and Su-35 fighters scanning from above and primed to launch very-long-range R-37M missile .

Theoretically, Ukraine could also cobble together means to ground-launch Storm Shadows, accepting a significantly reduced range.

Like most long-range cruise missiles, Storm Shadows are not cheap—probably costing around $1 million per shot. And most operators have inventories in the low-to-mid hundreds, not thousands, limiting how many they’re inclined to donate. Still, if the UK’s donations breaks the taboo on transferring long-range missiles to Ukraine, then multiple donors may help make up numbers—to an extent.

Long-range Strike Tactics

When, in the summer of 2022, Ukraine began using Western-supplied HIMAR systems to launch GMLR precision-guided rockets out to a range of 56 miles, it resulted in a succession of spectacularly destructive attacks on Russian HQs, airbases, and ammo depots.

Those spectacles declined in frequency after a few months, as the Russians learned their lesson and pushed vulnerable support structures back outside of HIMARS range—accepting a loss of efficiency for better survival odds. Russia also began employing GPS-jamming to throw off the aim of HIMARS and SDB glide bombs given to Ukraine.

In theory, then, Storm Shadow and similar weapons could give Ukrainian planners a second “happy period,” as Russian depots and HQs again fall into convenient precision-strike range—potentially devastating if timed to coincide with Ukraine’s anticipated 2023 counteroffensive.

And this time, those depots and command centers might have to relocate all the way to Russian soil to escape the Storm Shadow’s reach. That could especially threaten Russian forces in southern Ukraine, most distant from the Russian border.

But there are important differences to keep in mind. While Russian air defenses struggled to shoot down supersonic HIMARS rockets, Storm Shadow is a subsonic cruise missile—a class of weapon that Ukraine’s own air defense system has become efficient at shooting down.

Storm Shadow’s success—versus Russia’s technically superior air defenses—will depend in part on its stealth characteristics. Because the missile relies on image-matching instead of GPS for terminal guidance, it should at least be less degraded by Russian GPS jamming than HIMARS rockets.

Mena Adel, who writes on military aviation for Scramble magazine, told P opular Mechanics that tactics practiced by France and the UK using SCALP/Storm Shadow against Syria’s Soviet-built air defense systems offer a relevant model for Ukraine:

“The U.S., France and UK attacked with a sweeping attack by 4 different types of missiles, including [non-stealth] Tomahawk missiles which formed the largest part to disperse the Syrian air defense thereby reducing the chance of intercepting stealth missiles. All while monitored by Russian air defenses in Syria… It is certain that future attacks will be planned using different types of missile approach from different directions to deceive the Russian systems so that the desired targets are hit with great accuracy and a minimum interception rate. Stealthiness is not enough, success will depend on planning and deception.”

As Ukraine will not have nearly as many cruise missiles available, Adel suggested Ukraine might instead launch concerted attacks with drones and SDB glide bombs (both ground- and air-launched) supported by electronic warfare systems to confuse and overwhelm Russian air defenses.

Ukraine’s promise not to strike Russian soil with Western-supplied missiles could also inspire a false flag attack making it appear it has done so—a well-established tactic in Putin’s playbook . As Ukraine is sporadically attacking targets in Russia (mainly airbases, oil depots and electrical infrastructure) using agents and domestically-built drones and missiles, there could be grounds for confusion and misinformation.

Overall, Storm Shadow is a potent long-distance strike weapon Ukraine will have to employ judiciously for maximum effect—though even the likely modest number transferred to Ukraine will likely to cause anxiety to Russian logisticians, commanders, and air defense personnel.

Headshot of Sébastien Roblin

Sébastien Roblin has written on the technical, historical, and political aspects of international security and conflict for publications including 19FortyFive, The National Interest, MSNBC, Forbes.com, Inside Unmanned Systems and War is Boring. He holds a Master’s degree from Georgetown University and served with the Peace Corps in China. You can follow his articles on Twitter . 

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UK delivers cruise missiles to Ukraine ahead of counter-offensive

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What weapons are being given to Ukraine by the UK?

  • Published 15 May 2023
  • War in Ukraine

Ukrainian soldier with Nlaw anti-tank weapon

Ukraine's President Volodymyr Zelensky has been in the UK for talks with the Prime Minister Rishi Sunak.

The visit came ahead of a Ukrainian counter-offensive against Russian forces, expected to begin in the coming weeks.

Since the start of the conflict in Ukraine, the UK has been a major supplier of weapons and equipment to Kyiv, though on a much smaller scale than the US.

So what exactly is being sent, and how much of a difference is it making?

Long-range missiles

The UK confirmed that it had supplied Ukraine with long-range missiles earlier this month.

The Storm Shadow cruise missile has a range of over 250km (155 miles), according to the manufacturer.

By contrast, the US-supplied Himars missiles used by Ukraine only have a range of around 80 km (50 miles).

Graphic showing Storm Shadow Cruise missile

Currently, Storm Shadow has the longest range of any missile available to Ukraine, and can therefore strike targets previously believed to be safe by Russian forces.

Russia claims the system has already been used against its forces.

The UK is the first country to supply cruise missiles to Kyiv.

The UK also led the way in supplying Nato standard main battle tanks to Ukraine.

In January the UK announced that 14 Challenger 2 tanks would be sent, alongside around 30 AS90 self-propelled guns.

Graphic showing characteristics of the British-made Challenger 2 tank. The Challenger 2 is heavier and better armoured than Russian or Soviet-made tanks.

The Challenger 2 was built in the 1990s, but is significantly more advanced than Warsaw Pact standard tanks used by Ukraine.

Following the UK's announcement, several others committed to sending tanks to Ukraine, including Germany with its Leopard 2 model.

Many military analysts believe tanks, in co-ordination will other weapons systems, will be vital to any attempt by Ukraine to dislodge Russian forces from heavily fortified positions in the expected counter-offensive.

On Monday, Downing Street said that it would supply "hundreds" of attack drones and air defence missiles.

The statement did not reveal what kind of drones would be supplied, but it said they would have a range of over 124 miles (200km).

It is anticipated they may be used to hit logistics and control facilities deep behind Russian lines.

In 2022, the Ministry of Defence announced supplies of heavy lift drone systems to provide logistical support to isolated forces.

Graphic showing T150 Malloy heavy lift drones

Analysts say that drones can be very effective in getting supplies over the "last mile" to front line troops, particularly under threat of Russian artillery fire and in situations where there is a risk of encirclement.

"It's the sheer quantity of stuff needed by troops," says Justin Bronk of the Royal United Services Institute (Rusi). "Every time you can use a drone instead of a soldier to get supplies forward is one less time someone is exposed to extreme danger."

Rocket systems

The donation of M270 multiple-launch rocket systems with M31A1 precision munitions to Ukraine was confirmed in 2022.

The UK's M270 system is similar to the American Himars launchers.

MLRS graphic

Jack Watling Rusi told the BBC: "These systems are precisely what Ukraine needs. They allow the Ukrainians to out-range a lot of the Russian artillery systems and also to strike with precision."

Anti-tank weapons

The UK has sent more than 5,000 next generation light anti-tank weapons, or Nlaw, to Ukraine.

Graphic showing Nlaw anti-tank weapon..

Nlaws are designed to destroy tanks at short range with a single shot.

Crucially for Ukraine's armed forces who need weapons immediately, the missiles are easy to transport and simple to use. A soldier can be trained to use them in less than a day.

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Nlaw anti-tank missile used by Ukrainian forces

Many analysts believe they had a major impact on the course of the conflict in the days following Russia's invasion.

"Nlaw was absolutely critical to the defeat of Russian ground thrusts in the early stages of the war," says Mr Bronk.

The weapons have been "particularly effective" when used in combination with artillery, he says.

Short-range missiles

Maritime Brimstone missiles were also sent to Ukraine in 2022.

Graphic showing Brimstone 1 missile.

Brimstones can be used against tanks, artillery and some smaller vessels such as landing craft, according to Capt Chris Carlson, formerly of the US Navy.

The missiles are normally fired from aircraft, but in Ukraine they are being modified to be fired from trucks.

Launching them from the ground reduces their effective range, says Capt Carlson.

When used as anti-ship missiles, Brimstones are far too small to sink larger vessels, but could cause substantial damage.

"It all depends where you hit," he says. "If you went through an engine or near the water line, you could give an enemy some serious trouble."

Armoured vehicles

Britain has donated at least 120 armoured vehicles to Ukraine, including Mastiff patrol vehicles.

Graphic showing Mastiff armoured vehicle..

Mastiffs were very popular among British troops in Afghanistan as they provide a high level of protection against landmines and improvised explosive devices.

Analysts say that in an area which as been as heavily mined as the Donbas, Mastiffs are likely to be very useful.

It is understood that both sides in the conflict have used landmines extensively.

line

War in Ukraine: More coverage

  • COUNTER-OFFENSIVE: Zelensky: We must wait before starting offensive
  • ANALYSIS: What weapons is the world giving?
  • READ MORE: Full coverage of the crisis

Air defence systems

Britain says it has donated at least six air defence systems, including Starstreak missiles.

Graphic showing Starstreak missile..

Starstreak is designed to bring down low-flying aircraft at short range.

It ignores counter-measures such as flares and chaff deployed by many aircraft.

A Ukrainian soldier fires a shoulder-mounted Starstreak missile

"From a pilot's point of view, Starstreak is a very unpleasant thing," says Mr Bronk. "There's very little you can do about it."

He says Russian forces may deem some operations too risky if they are aware that a weapon as deadly as Starstreak is on the ground.

The UK has also supplied Stormer vehicles to act as a mobile platform for Starstreak missiles.

Graphic showing Stormer HVM..

Other equipment supplied by the UK includes:

  • Javelin anti-tank missiles
  • Anti-structure munitions
  • Plastic explosives
  • Small-arms munition
  • Body armour
  • Night vision devices
  • Electronic warfare equipment
  • Counter battery radar systems
  • GPS jamming equipment

Graphics by Gerry Fletcher.

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Ukraine gets British long-range missiles ahead of counteroffensive

british cruise missiles for ukraine

LONDON — Britain has donated Storm Shadow cruise missiles to the Ukrainian air force in a move widely seen as a game changer in Kyiv’s ability to mount long-range strikes against invading Russian forces.

The decision to hand over a quantity of the MBDA-built cruise missiles was announced by British Defense Secretary Ben Wallace in a May 11 statement to lawmakers here.

“Storm Shadow is a long-range, conventional, precision-strike capability,” he said. “It compliments the long-range systems already gifted, including HIMARS and Harpoon missiles, as well as Ukraine’s own Neptune cruise missiles and longer-range munitions already gifted.”

The Anglo-French-developed Storm Shadow missile, known in France as Scalp-EG, has a range in excess of 250 kilometers, or 155 miles, and is particularly effective against hardened and buried targets, according to the manufacturer.

The donation of Storm Shadow missiles, many of which are already in Ukraine, means the British are the first nation to supply Kyiv with long range weapons.

Wallace described the government’s decision as a “calibrated, proportionate response to Russian’s escalation” in its invasion of Ukraine.

“These systems are not in the same league as the Russian AS-24 Killjoy hypersonic missile or Shahed Iranian one-way attack drones, or their Kalibr cruise missile with a range of over 2,000 km, roughly 7 times that of the Storm Shadow missile,” Wallace said. “Russia must recognize that their actions alone have led to such systems being provided to Ukraine.”

Wallace said technical hurdles integrating the weapon onto Ukraine’s Soviet-era combat jets had been successfully overcome.

“Having technically cleared the hurdles, and as everyone talks about an expected counter-offense, now is the right time to gift these to Ukraine, and they [Storm Shadows] are now going into or are in the country,” he said.

The British have been signaling for months their intention to donate the long-range weapon to the Ukrainians, and confirmation of the move comes ahead of a long expected offensive by Kyiv against Russian forces occupying parts of the country.

It’s part of a wider Western effort to strengthen Ukraine’s deep-strike capabilities which has recently seen a British-led effort to procure missiles or rockets with a range of 100-300km and payloads between 20kg and 490kg as part of an international funding arrangement.

The Storm Shadow weapon provides the Ukrainian air force with a substantial step up in capability, according to Douglas Barrie, senior air analyst at the International Institute for Strategic Studies think tank in London.

“It really provides Ukraine with a long-range strike capability it doesn’t have,” he said. “It’s in a different league compared with other weapons in Kyiv’s arsenal.”

Storm Shadow has been used extensively by the Royal Air Force, first on Tornado strike jets and more recently the Typhoon combat jet.

The weapon was rushed into operational use against Iraq in 2003 even though it was not officially in service at the time. Since then it has been used in the Middle East and Libya.

Storm Shadow is the second sophisticated Western air-to-ground weapon known to have been supplied to Ukraine since the Russian invasion got underway in late February 2022.

Last year the U.S. integrated HARM AGM-88 missiles on Ukrainian MiG-29 and Su-27 warplanes in a matter of weeks to be able to strike Russian air defenses located in Ukraine.

Andrew Chuter is the United Kingdom correspondent for Defense News.

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UK sends cruise missiles to Ukraine as Kyiv prepares for counteroffensive

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — The British government said Thursday that it sent long-range cruise missiles to Ukraine to help drive out Russia’s occupying forces, an announcement made as Kyiv said it had delayed a long-expected spring counteroffensive while awaiting the delivery of more Western weapons.

Britain is donating Storm Shadow missiles, a conventionally armed deep-strike weapon with a range of more than 250 kilometers (150 miles), U.K. Defense Secretary Ben Wallace told lawmakers in the House of Commons.

READ MORE: U.S. to provide Ukraine $1.2 billion in long-term military aid

The air-launched missiles would allow Ukrainian forces to target locations deep behind the front line, including in Russia-occupied Crimea. The invaded country has pledged not to use them to attack Russia itself, U.K. media reported.

Wallace said the missiles “are now going into or are in the country itself.” He didn’t say how many were being provided.

The announcement came shortly after Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said his country’s military needs more time to prepare for the anticipated counteroffensive.

Zelenskyy said in an interview broadcast Thursday by the BBC that it would be “unacceptable” to launch the assault now because too many lives would be lost.

“With (what we have), we can go forward and be successful,” Zelenskyy said in the interview, according to the BBC.

“But we’d lose a lot of people. I think that’s unacceptable,” he was quoted as saying. The interview was reportedly conducted in Kyiv with public service broadcasters who are members of Eurovision News, including the BBC.

“So we need to wait. We still need a bit more time,” Zelenskyy was quoted as saying. “In terms of equipment, not everything has arrived yet.”

A Ukrainian fightback against Russia’s invasion has been expected for weeks. Ukraine is receiving Western training as well as advanced weapons for its troops as it gears up for an expected assault.

The British move gives another boost to the Ukrainian military after it received other advanced Western weapons including tanks and long-range precision artillery.

Ben Hodges, a former U.S. Army Europe Commanding General, tweeted: ““Well done UK!”

“This will give Ukraine capability to make Crimea untenable for Russian forces” and require Russia to reevaluate the positioning of its Black Sea fleet, Hodges said.

While a counterpunch is possible as the weather in Ukraine improves, there has been no word on when it might happen. Zelenskyy’s remarks could be a red herring to keep the Russians guessing, and ammunition supply difficulties faced by both sides have added more uncertainty.

A claim by the Ukrainian military on Wednesday that its troops had advanced up to 2 kilometers (1.2 miles) around the hotly contested eastern city of Bakhmut brought speculation that the counteroffensive was already underway.

Serhii Cherevatyi, spokesman for Ukraine’s Operational Command East, told The Associated Press that the fighting and forward movement was not the “grand counteroffensive, but it’s a harbinger showing that there will be more such attacks in the future.”

But, the head of Russia’s private military force Wagner that has spearheaded Moscow’s battle for Bakhmut, claimed the Ukrainian counteroffensive was “in full swing,” with Ukrainian forces advancing “on the flanks” around Bakhmut.

“Unfortunately, in some areas they’re doing it successfully,” Wagner founder Yevgeny Prigozhin said.

READ MORE: What to know about Russia’s Wagner mercenaries as they threaten to leave Ukraine’s front line

The Kremlin’s forces are deeply entrenched in eastern areas of Ukraine with layered defensive lines reportedly up to 20 kilometers (12 miles) deep. Kyiv’s counteroffensive would likely face minefields, anti-tank ditches and other obstacles.

Russia is “acting slow” in Ukraine because it wants to preserve infrastructure and save lives there, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov claimed in an interview with the Bosnian Serb channel ATV broadcast Wednesday night.

Moscow has repeatedly explained its lack of advances on the battlefield as an effort to protect civilians, but those claims have been proven false.

Zelenskyy said Russian President Vladimir Putin is counting on reducing the war to a so-called frozen conflict, with neither side able to dislodge the other, according to the BBC. He ruled out surrendering territory to Russia in return for a peace deal.

Military analysts have warned that Putin is hoping that the West’s costly support for Kyiv will begin to fray.

Ukraine’s Western allies have sent the country 65 billion euros ($70 billion) in military aid to help thwart the Kremlin’s ambitions, and with no peace negotiations on the horizon the alliance is gearing up to send more.

European Union Foreign policy chief Josep Borrell said the possible need to delay a counteroffensive was a sign that the West must step up its military support for Ukraine.

“Certainly, they need more preparation,” Borrell said at a defense and security conference in Brussels. “They need more arms. They need to gather more capacity, and it is us who have to provide for that.”

A senior NATO official said that in the coming months of the war, Ukraine will have the edge in quality but Russia has the upper hand in quantity.

“The Russians are now starting to use very old materiel, very old capabilities,” Adm. Bob Bauer, chair of the NATO Military Committee, told reporters late Wednesday in Brussels.

“The Russians will have to focus on quantity,” he said. “Larger number of conscripts and mobilized people. Not well-trained. Older materiel, but large numbers, and not as precise, not as good as the newer ones.”

Over the winter, the conflict became bogged down in a war of attrition with both sides relying heavily on bombardment of each other’s positions.

Russia’s latest long-range barrages killed at least six civilians were killed and wounded 13 more between Thursday and Friday mornings, Ukraine’s presidential office said.

READ MORE: Ukraine says it downed Russian hypersonic missile with U.S. Patriot defense system

A counteroffensive is a major challenge, requiring the Ukrainian military to orchestrate a wide range of capabilities, including providing ammunition, food, medical supplies and spare parts, strung along potentially extended supply lines.

The front line extends more than 1,000 kilometers (600 miles).

The Kremlin wants Kyiv to acknowledge Russia’s sovereignty over Crimea and also recognize September’s annexation of the Ukrainian provinces of Donetsk, Kherson, Luhansk, and Zaporizhzhia.

Ukraine has rejected the demands and ruled out any talks with Russia until its troops pull back from all occupied territories.

Jill Lawless reported from London. Lorne Cook contributed to this story from Brussels.

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U.K. giving Ukraine long-range cruise missiles ahead of counteroffensive against Russia's invasion

May 11, 2023 / 10:14 AM EDT / CBS/AP

Kyiv, Ukraine  — The British government announced Thursday it was giving long-range cruise missiles to Ukraine to help drive out Russia's occupying forces. The boost to Ukraine's forces came as Kyiv delayed its long-anticipated counteroffensive more than 14 months after the Kremlin's full-scale invasion, as the country awaits the delivery of more Western weapons.

U.K. Defense Secretary Ben Wallace told lawmakers in the House of Commons that Britain is donating Storm Shadow missiles, a conventionally-armed deep-strike weapon with a range of more than 150 miles. That means they can hit targets deep behind the front lines, including in Russia-occupied Crimea. U.K. media reported that Ukraine had pledged not to use the missiles to attack Russia itself.

storm-shadow-missile-uk-ap03032205557.jpg

Wallace said the missiles were "now going into or are in" Ukraine.

Ben Hodges, a former U.S. Army Europe Commanding General, tweeted : "Well done UK!"

He added: "This will give Ukraine capability to make Crimea untenable for Russian forces," and would force a Russian rethink of where to position its Black Sea fleet.

The British move gives another boost to the Ukrainian military as it receives other advanced Western weapons, including heavy battle tanks , long-range precision artillery and air defense weapons .

The announcement came shortly after Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said his country's military needed more time to prepare for the anticipated counteroffensive, aimed at pushing back Russian forces who've occupied a vast swath of the eastern part of the country, and opening a new chapter in the war more than 14 months after the Kremlin's full-scale invasion.

Zelenskyy said in an interview broadcast Thursday by the BBC that it would be "unacceptable" to launch the assault now because too many lives would be lost.

"With (what we have) we can go forward and be successful," Zelenskyy said in the interview, according to the BBC. "But we'd lose a lot of people. I think that's unacceptable."

The interview was reportedly carried out in Kyiv with public service broadcasters who are members of Eurovision News, including the BBC.

"So we need to wait. We still need a bit more time," Zelenskyy was quoted as saying.

A Ukrainian fightback against Russia's invasion has been expected for weeks. Ukraine is receiving Western training as well as advanced weapons for its troops as it gears up for an expected assault.

While a counterpunch is possible as the weather in Ukraine improves, there has been no word on when it might happen. Zelenskyy's remarks could be a red herring to keep the Russians guessing, and ammunition supply difficulties faced by both sides have added more uncertainty.

A claim by the Ukrainian military on Wednesday that it had advanced up to 1.2 miles around the hotly contested eastern city of Bakhmut brought speculation that the counteroffensive was already underway. But Serhii Cherevatyi, spokesman for Ukraine's Operational Command East, told The Associated Press the attack was not the "grand counteroffensive, but it's a harbinger showing that there will be more such attacks in the future."

The Kremlin's forces are deeply entrenched in eastern areas of Ukraine, with layered defensive lines reportedly up to 12 miles deep. Kyiv's counteroffensive would likely face minefields, anti-tank ditches and other obstacles.

Russia is "acting slow" in Ukraine because it wants to preserve infrastructure and save lives there, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov claimed in an interview with the Bosnian Serb channel ATV broadcast Wednesday night.

Moscow has repeatedly explained its lack of advances on the battlefield as an effort to protect civilians, but those claims have been proven false.

Zelenskyy said Russian President Vladimir Putin is counting on reducing the war to a so-called frozen conflict, with neither side able to dislodge the other, according to the BBC. He has ruled out surrendering territory to Russia in return for a peace deal.

Military analysts have warned that Putin is hoping the West's costly support for Kyiv will begin to fray. Ukraine's Western allies have sent the country some $70 billion in military aid to help thwart the Kremlin's ambitions, and with no peace negotiations on the horizon the alliance is gearing up to send more.

European Union Foreign policy chief Josep Borrell said the possible need to delay a counteroffensive was a sign that the West must step up its military support for Ukraine.

"Certainly, they need more preparation," Borrell said at a defense and security conference in Brussels. "They need more arms. They need to gather more capacity, and it is us who have to provide for that."

A senior NATO official said that in the coming months of the war, Ukraine will have the edge in quality but Russia has the upper hand in quantity.

"The Russians are now starting to use very old materiel , very old capabilities," Adm. Bob Bauer, chair of the NATO Military Committee, told reporters late Wednesday in Brussels.

"The Russians will have to focus on quantity," he said. "Larger number of conscripts and mobilized people. Not well-trained. Older materiel, but large numbers, and not as precise, not as good as the newer ones."

Over the winter, the conflict became bogged down in a war of attrition with both sides relying heavily on bombardment of each other's positions.

A counteroffensive is a major challenge, requiring the Ukrainian military to orchestrate a wide range of capabilities, including providing ammunition, food, medical supplies and spare parts, strung along potentially extended supply lines.

The front line extends more than 600 miles, running from the north to the south of eastern Ukrain, but the most intense fighting this year has been around Bakhmut.

The Kremlin wants Kyiv to acknowledge Russia's sovereignty over Crimea and also recognize September's annexation of the Ukrainian provinces of Donetsk, Kherson, Luhansk, and Zaporizhzhia. Ukraine has rejected the demands and ruled out any talks with Russia until its troops pull back from all occupied territories.

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Britain prepares to send long-range missiles to Ukraine

The u.k. is pushing the biden administration into providing ukraine with weapons that can reach further into russian-held territory.

british cruise missiles for ukraine

Britain, which has prided itself on being ahead of its Western allies in introducing new weapons systems to Ukraine, now appears poised to send Kyiv the long-range missiles the Biden administration has long denied it.

In a procurement notice posted May 2 by the British-led International Fund for Ukraine, a group of northern European countries that has set up a mechanism to send weapons to the battlefield, the United Kingdom’s Defense Ministry asked for “expressions of interest” in providing strike capabilities with a range of up to 300 kilometers, or nearly 200 miles. The notice asked for responses within three days.

No final decision has been made, according to a British official who declined to confirm the type, timing or quantity of weaponry under consideration. But the notice is a substantive step toward Britain itself supplying such munitions, and the requested specifications and capabilities closely match its air-launched Storm Shadow cruise missiles.

Ukraine has long pleaded with Western nations for longer range missiles, arguing that such weapons could change the course of the war by allowing its forces to target Russian command centers, supply lines, ammunition and fuel dumps deep inside Crimea and Russian-held territory in eastern Ukraine. As Kyiv prepares to launch a major counteroffensive as soon as within the next several weeks, the ability to strike far behind Russia’s front lines would help clear the way for a ground assault with tanks and infantry troops.

Senior Ukrainian officials fear counterattack may not live up to hype

Storm Shadows can be mounted on Ukraine’s Soviet-made jets and reach into Russian territory. Kyiv has long sought that capability, and tried to ease Western escalation fears with pledges it would refrain from using donated weapons in such attacks.

“If we could strike at a distance of up to 300 kilometers, the Russian army wouldn’t be able to provide defense and will have to lose,” Ukrainian Defense Minister Oleksii Reznikov told the European Union earlier this year. “Ukraine is ready to provide any guarantees that your weapons will not be involved in attacks on the Russian territory.”

Moscow has charged that Kyiv has adapted drones for long range use in what have been sporadic attacks deep inside Russia. Kyiv has not asserted responsibility for any of the attacks, but has claimed its right to hit internal Russian targets with its own weapons.

Ukraine denies Kremlin’s claim of drone assassination attempt on Putin

Concerns that Ukraine would fire missiles at targets in Russia is a key reason the administration has repeatedly rebuffed Ukrainian pleas to supply long-range U.S. munitions.

The United States has provided multiple-launch precision rocket systems, including the High Mobility Artillery Rocket System, or HIMARS, but only with munitions whose range is limited to about 50 miles. In a weapons package announced earlier this year, the Pentagon said it will send Ukraine Ground-Launched Small-Diameter Bombs (GLSDB) with double that range. They can also be fired from HIMARS, but delivery is not expected until later this year at the earliest.

HIMARS also has the capability to fire the Army Tactical Missile System, or ATACMS, a munition with a range equal to that of the Storm Shadow’s 300 kilometers. But the Biden administration has been unyielding in denying Ukrainian appeals for those weapons, with Pentagon officials, in addition to fears of escalating the conflict, citing short supplies in U.S. arsenals.

British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak has dismissed talk among Ukraine’s benefactors of their depleted stockpiles. “If there is a moment in this conflict we can make a difference, why not seize it? What are we waiting for?” he asked of European allies at the Munich Security Conference in February. “What is the purpose of these stockpiles? If the weapons are degrading Russian armed forces, that is increasing our security.”

Weeks before those remarks, according to a previously unreported file included among the classified U.S. documents leaked online through the Discord messaging platform, U.S. intelligence confirmed Britain intended to send Ukraine an unspecified number of Storm Shadow missiles, along with British personnel to aid in targeting.

“The United Kingdom will be the first country to provide Ukraine with longer range weapons,” Sunak said in his Munich speech.

Foreign Secretary James Cleverly, on a visit Tuesday to Washington, acknowledged the argument that “we shouldn’t leave our respective military cupboards bare.” But, he said in remarks at the Atlantic Council, “My answer is that if we’re saving stuff up for a rainy day, this is the rainy day.”

Being first is something Britain has striven for throughout the war, beginning under former prime minister Boris Johnson. After the United States, Britain has been the second-largest supplier of Ukraine military aid — contributing $2.5 billion worth of munitions last year. Though that’s only a fraction of what Washington has provided, the British have claimed the cutting edge, sending some of the first shoulder-launched anti-air and antitank weapons to combat Russia’s February 2022 invasion, and more recently by training pilots on NATO-standard fighter jets.

In mid-January, Britain broke through allied reluctance to send heavy tanks to Ukraine by unilaterally announcing it would send 14 British-made Challenger tanks. The United States, Germany and others in Europe eventually followed suit in promising to send their own heavy armor.

“It’s a position the United Kingdom can uniquely do [since] Russia doesn’t like us very much anyway,” said the same British official, speaking on the condition of anonymity about internal alliance issues. “We know that if we give something it makes it slightly easier for others.”

“There is definitely a different risk tolerance among different countries. We’re often in an earlier place,” the official said, citing the pilot training, even though no country has yet agreed to provide the NATO-standard aircraft, particularly F-16s, that Ukraine has asked for.

While U.S. policy remains unchanged, Pentagon officials expressed no concern when asked about the prospect of Britain sending long range missiles to Ukraine. “Each country makes their own sovereign decisions on what types of security assistance and what kinds of equipment they provide,” said Pentagon press secretary Brig. Gen. Patrick Ryder. “We commend the significant support that allies and partners from around the world, including the United Kingdom, are providing to Ukraine.”

U.S. lawmakers of both parties who support an aggressive stance have repeatedly urged the administration to provide Ukraine with ATACMS and F-16s. In a statement issued after late-January announcements by Germany and the United States that they, too, would send tanks, Democratic Sens. Richard Blumenthal (Conn.) and Sheldon Whitehouse (R.I.), along with Republican Lindsey O. Graham (S.C.) urged “the Biden administration and our allies to send more long range artillery, such as ATACMS and fighter aircraft.”

“I’ve long been pushing for the longer range, ATACMS, for example,” Rep. Jason Crow (D-Colo.), a military veteran who served in Iraq, said at the Hudson Institute two weeks ago. “I think it’s time to do that. We see less and less talk about escalation” as Russian President Vladimir Putin has crossed “every red line,” Crow said. “The Ukrainians have proven themselves to be responsible partners” and “have every incentive” to abide by restrictions on long-range weapon use, lest they lose Western support.

The distance between Ukrainian-held territory and Sevastopol, Crimea’s largest city and the headquarters of Russia’s Black Sea fleet, is within the range of the Storm Shadow, which was originally developed as an Anglo-French project in the early 1990s and is held in the arsenals of a number of countries in Europe and the Persian Gulf. Used by Britain in Iraq in 2003, and by Britain, France and Italy in Libya in 2011, it has been adapted to fit on a number of different aircraft.

The weapons would allow Kyiv’s forces to adopt tactics already in use by Russia, which launches “cruise missiles [from aircraft] inside their own territory to be beyond Ukrainian air defenses,” said Mark Cancian, a senior adviser to the Center for Strategic and International Studies International Security Program who has specialized in weapons systems used in the Ukraine war.

“All you need to do is give it ten digit coordinates,” Cancian said of the missile targeting. “There’s nothing else you need to do intelwise.”

Dan Lamothe contributed to this report.

The Discord Leaks

The Washington Post and “ Frontline ” partnered to investigate Jack Teixeira’s alleged leak of classified U.S. intelligence on the Discord chat platform . The new documentary, “The Discord Leaks,” premiered Tuesday, Dec. 12 and is available to watch on PBS streaming platforms and washingtonpost.com .

The suspected document leaker: Teixeira, a young member of the Massachusetts Air National Guard, was indicted on six charges . Interviews with people who knew Teixeira offer the most detailed account yet of how he allegedly leaked classified information and his motivations. Discord’s rules and culture allowed a racist and antisemitic community to flourish, giving Teixeira an eager audience unlikely to report his alleged lawbreaking.

How the leak happened: The Washington Post reported that the individual who leaked the information shared documents with a small circle of online friends on the Discord chat platform. The Air Force disciplined 15 members of the Air National Guard after an internal investigation found that a “lack of supervision” helped enable Teixeira. This is a timeline of how the documents leaked .

What we learned from the leaked documents: The massive document leak has exposed a range of U.S. government secrets, including spying on allies, the grim prospects for Ukraine’s war with Russia and the precariousness of Taiwan’s air defenses . It also has ignited diplomatic fires for the White House. Here’s what we’ve learned from the documents .

british cruise missiles for ukraine

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An RAF Tornado with two Storm Shadows missiles

British-led coalition hopes to supply longer-range missiles to Ukraine

UK opens tender for rockets akin to those denied by US, which could enable strikes deep into Crimea

Britain and a group of European allies are hoping to supply long-distance cruise missiles to Ukraine , similar in range to those the US has so far refused to supply Kyiv, which could allow its army to strike deep into Russian-occupied Crimea.

A tender document quietly released by the UK calls for western arms makers to offer “missiles or rockets with a range 100-300km” (62 to 186 miles) to the International Fund for Ukraine, run jointly with Denmark, the Netherlands, Norway and Sweden.

The capabilities specified are in line with the high-end Storm Shadow missile which has a range of “in excess of 250km” according to its manufacturer, European arms group MBDA, which makes them for the British and French militaries.

A British official, speaking anonymously, said the tender requirements were “rather consistent” with the Storm Shadow, although they emphasised no final decision had yet been taken to supply the cruise missiles to Ukraine.

Ukraine’s leadership have long sought long-range missiles to hit enemy troop concentrations and logistics hubs deep behind the frontline, but the White House has refused to give Kyiv weapons that could strike well inside Russia’s internationally recognised borders.

Leaked Pentagon papers reported, based on electronic eavesdropping, that Ukraine’s president, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, complained in late February to the head of the country’s military, Gen Valeriy Zaluzhny, that Ukraine “does not have long-range missiles capable of reaching Russian troop deployments in Russia”.

High-precision US Himars rocket launchers used heavily by Ukraine use missiles with a much shorter range of 47 miles. There is also a longer-range, 186-mile ATACMS variant, but it is this that the Biden administration has repeatedly declined to supply, worried that such a move could be considered escalatory.

Britain is unlikely to want to go ahead without US support, and getting to this point may have required diplomatic wrangling. Rishi Sunak, the UK prime minister, said the UK “will be the first country to give Ukraine longer-range weapons” – but that was back in February.

Ukrainian sources said they were hopeful. The country’s leaders are also likely to promise not to strike inside Russia proper with the missiles, using them to support a keenly anticipated counteroffensive aimed at forcing Moscow to abandon Crimea and other occupied Ukrainian territory.

Ben Hodges, a former commanding general for the US army in Europe, said he believed Russia’s “Black Sea fleet would already have departed Sevastopol if Ukraine had Storm Shadow”, which is one of several precursors to recapturing Crimea. Zelenskiy and other Ukrainian leaders “would not want to lose the trust of the west” by using long-range missiles beyond agreed limits, the retired general argued.

Even if the UK and its European partners go ahead, another issue is cost. Each cruise missile is estimated to cost around £2m, a significant expense for the International Fund, which has £320m left of the £520m first raised from the UK and other partners.

Storm Shadow missiles for the UK are made in Stevenage and were originally an Anglo-French joint development. The missiles were first fired in the 2003 invasion of Iraq, and have been used by the UK on a number of occasions to bomb Islamic State targets in Syria and Iraq.

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In theory, they can be mounted on the Soviet-designed MiG-29 and Su-27 combat jets still used by Ukraine. Despite Russia’s greater air power, Kyiv has managed to retain a small air force, capable of running a dozen or so missions a day, after 15 months of the war.

Britain’s Ministry of Defence said: “We have invited industry suppliers to submit expressions of interest” to provide long -range missiles and other arms. A final decision to supply to Ukraine would rest with the five country executive panel, the spokesperson added.

Suppliers who have expressed interest “will be contacted from 5 June”, the tender document says, although the fund has in the past been plagued by delays .

It is likely that any Storm Shadow missiles supplied would be at a reduced export range of about 186 miles (300km) to comply with the voluntary Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) to which the UK, Ukraine and the US are all signed up to.

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UK offers Taurus missile swap with Germany for more Storm Shadows to arm Ukraine 

british cruise missiles for ukraine

The United Kingdom has proposed a weapon exchange to address Germany’s concerns over long-range missile delivery to Ukraine. 

According to sources cited by Handelsblatt, London is seeking Taurus cruise missiles from Berlin, in exchange for supplying additional SCALP-EG/Storm Shadow cruise missiles to Ukraine. 

The proposal aims to provide Ukraine with more advanced weaponry capable of striking deeper within Russian-occupied territory. Germany has been under pressure from Kyiv to supply its Taurus missiles. 

“The British offer has been on the table for several weeks,” a source told the German daily. “It would offer [German Chancellor Olaf] Scholz a welcome opportunity to defuse the controversy within the coalition.” 

On January 17, 2024, a motion proposing the delivery of Taurus cruise missiles to Ukraine was rejected in the Bundestag, the German parliament, by a majority vote 

british cruise missiles for ukraine

Germany’s Bundestag rejects Taurus cruise missile delivery to Ukraine 

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“ Not an equivalent replacement “

The potential deal, still under consideration by Scholz’s office, has sparked mixed reactions within Germany. For instance, some have argued that the Luftwaffe would first need to secure funding to replace any missiles provided to the Royal Air Force. 

“Ukraine needs Taurus, and it needs it now,” Chairwoman of the Defense Committee of the Bundestag, Marie-Agnès Strack-Zimmermann, commented. “Storm Shadow is not an equivalent replacement. In this respect, the proposal is unsuitable.” 

Though both missiles are ùanufactured by the European missile maker MBDA, the Taurus outshines the SCALP-EG/Storm Shadow with its advanced technology in handling the double explosive charge in its warhead. In contrast to the timed secondary explosions of its counterpart, the Taurus employs a layer counting and void detection system, ensuring unmatched precision in its strikes. This could, for example, allow Ukraine to target the pillar of a bridge after penetrating the deck.  

The offer comes in the wake of both the UK and France’s commitment to transfer around SCALP-EG/Storm Shadow cruise missiles to Ukraine, with the latter announcing a new delivery batch in January 2024.  

However, concerns persist in Germany about potential escalation by supplying Ukraine with more advanced weapons that could reach targets deep inside Russia. Both the Storm Shadow and the Taurus missile have an operational range exceeding 500 kilometers (310 miles). 

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Ukraine Has Armed Both Of Its Bomber Types With High-Tech British Cruise Missiles

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A Ukrainian air force Su-24M carrying Storm Shadow missiles.

The Ukrainian air force has armed its Sukhoi Su-24M bombers with British-made Storm Shadow cruise missiles. A photo that appeared online on Friday depicts one of the swing-wing, supersonic bombers clutching a pair of the 1.5-ton, subsonic Storm Shadows under its wing roots.

An earlier photo—actually, a photo of a photo— had confirmed Ukraine’s Su-24MR reconnaissance planes were carrying Storm Shadows. Now we know both Su-24 variants in Ukrainian service have been modified to fire the stealthy, 155-mile-range missile.

The question is, how many of the two-crew Su-24s does Ukraine have left? The answer could indicate the scale of the Ukrainian air force’s new deep-strike capability.

Just how many Storm Shadows the Ukrainians can shoot at Russian logistical targets depends not only on the number of missiles the United Kingdom has supplied, but how many Su-24s are active with the only Ukrainian unit that flies the type: the 7th Bomber Regiment at Starokostiantyniv air base in western Ukraine.

The Ukrainian air force went to war with around 125 combat aircraft, mostly Mikoyan MiG-29 fighters but also around two dozen Su-24Ms and Su-24MRs.

In 15 months of hard fighting, the Russians shot down 16 Ukrainian Su-24s that independent analysts can confirm and also destroyed a 17th bomber on the ground. Without a source of fresh airframes, the 7th Bomber Regiment by now would be incapable of sustaining daily combat sorties.

Patrick Roegies, Paul Gross and Hans Looijmans, writing for Aviation Photography Digest back in 2015, tallied 25 active Ukrainian Su-24s and also counted nine or 17 nearly-airworthy Su-24s at Starokostiantyniv plus around 30 additional bombers “stored in relatively good condition.”

They did not count scores of derelict Su-24 airframes in open storage at bases across Ukraine, in particular the aircraft boneyard in Bila Tserkva, near Kyiv.

In 1991, the Ukrainian air force inherited from the disintegrating Soviet air force no fewer than 200 Su-24s. Most of the bombers wound up in open storage. Probably none of these airframes have any value except as sources of simple airframe components that the active bomber force might use as spares.

The air force in short had as many as 47 Su-24s that, with some effort, it could bring to active status to make good the 7th Bomber Regiment’s losses. Subtract the 17 jets we know for sure the regiment has lost—and add the eight or so pre-war Sukhois that remain. The 7th Bomber Regiment in theory could operate as many as 55 Su-24s.

In reality, the number probably is much, much lower. Not only is it possible Ukraine has lost more Su-24s to Russian missiles than analysts have confirmed with photos and videos—it also is likely many of the stored Su-24s are too far gone ever to fly again.

But it’s telling that, when the United Kingdom pledged Storm Shadows to the Ukrainian war effort back in February, British and Ukrainian planners tapped the Su-24 force to carry the high-tech, GPS-guided missiles.

They surely wouldn’t have assigned Ukraine’s sole aerial deep-strike mission to the 7th Bomber Regiment if the regiment didn’t have enough airworthy Sukhois to sustain daily sorties.

David Axe

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UK offers cruise-missile swap to Germany to aid Ukraine -Handelsblatt

A STORM SHADOW MISSILE IS PREPARED FOR LOADING ON TO AN RAF TORNADO GR4AIRCRAFT IN THE GULF.

Reporting by Andreas Rinke in Berlin and Ludwig Burger in Frankfurt, additional reporting by Kylie MacLellan in London; Editing by Sandra Maler

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Russia threatens 'military response' after UK gives long-range missiles to Ukraine

Ukraine has long been calling for long-range missiles, but the US and other countries have been unwilling to supply them in case strikes inside Russia lead to escalation.

british cruise missiles for ukraine

Political reporter

Friday 12 May 2023 06:17, UK

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Ben Wallace

The UK has been threatened with a "military response" by Russia after pledging to send long-range missiles to Ukraine.

The UK's defence secretary Ben Wallace said Storm Shadow missiles will be provided to Ukraine 's military - and Sky News understands that some of the missiles are already with Ukrainian troops.

In response to reports the deal had been done, Moscow said the move would require an "adequate response from our military".

british cruise missiles for ukraine

Latest news: Politics latest: Tories clarify stance on election pact with other parties War latest: R ussia threatens UK with 'adequate response' after missile announcement

Storm Shadow is a long-range, air-launched cruise missile developed by British Aerospace and a French company, which carries a 450kg conventional warhead to a range of up to 200 miles (300km).

Speaking in the House of Commons, Mr Wallace said: "The donation of these weapons systems gives Ukraine the best chance to defend themselves against Russia's continued brutality, especially the deliberate targeting of Ukrainian civilian infrastructure, which is against international law.

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"Ukraine has a right to be able to defend itself against this."

He added that the missiles would be for use "within Ukrainian sovereign territory".

Missiles being launched into Russia would raise the likelihood of a greater Russian reaction.

British forces used Storm Shadows in the Iraq in 2003

Mr Wallace said he would not give in-depth details of the capabilities of Storm Shadow - but said: "These weapons will give Ukraine new capability, members should recognise that these systems are not even in the same league as the Russian AS-24 killjoy hypersonic missile," or "even the Kalibr cruise missile with a range of over 2,000 kilometres, roughly seven times that of a Storm Shadow missile".

What are storm shadow cruise missiles?

Niamh Lynch, Sky News reporter

News reporter

The deployment of the Storm Shadow cruise missiles mark a significant step-up in the capabilities of arms the UK has sent to Ukraine.

The missile has a strike capability of nearly 200 miles (300km) - meaning it would potentially allow Ukraine to hit further into Russian territory.

The missile weighs 1.3 tonnes and is just over 5m long.

It is launched from the air, and in theory can be used from Ukraine's Soviet-made jets.

UK-owned Storm Shadow missiles are made in Stevenage by MBDA. Each cruise missile costs an estimated £2m.

The Storm Shadow was originally developed as a project between the UK and France in the early 1990s.

It was used in Iraq in 2003, while France, Italy and the UK used it in Libya in 2011.

The missiles have also been used to bomb Islamic State targets in Syria and Iraq.

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy has pleaded with Western nations for these types of missiles for months - but the requests have been denied, especially by the US.

In his speech, the defence secretary laid out some of the ways Russia had been attacking Ukraine - including allegations it had used white phosphorous.

He said that using such weapons - "which burn at 800C" - is in contravention of "protocol three of the Convention of Certain Conventional Weapons".

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Britain is supplying Ukraine with long-range cruise missiles

british cruise missiles for ukraine

LONDON - Britain said on Thursday it has started supplying Ukraine with Storm Shadow long-range cruise missiles , which will allow Ukrainian forces to hit Russian troops and supply dumps deep behind the front lines.

Ukraine has been asking for months for long-range missiles, but support provided by Britain and other allies such as the United States has previously been limited to shorter range weapons.

“We will simply not stand by as Russia kills civilians,” Defence Minister Ben Wallace told Parliament.

“Russia must recognise that its actions alone have led to such systems being provided to Ukraine.”

Mr Wallace said Britain was supplying the weapons to Ukraine, so they could be used within its sovereign territory, implying he has received assurances from Ukraine that they will not be used to target inside Russia.

The missiles “are now going into, or are in, the country itself”, he said.

The Kremlin earlier said that if Britain provided these missiles, it would require “an adequate response from our military”.

Britain and other Western countries have increased their military aid for Ukraine in 2023.

Mr Wallace and Foreign Minister James Cleverly have been in the US for talks on supporting Ukraine in recent weeks.

Kyiv is expected to unleash a counteroffensive soon, after six months of keeping its forces on the defensive.

Russia mounted a huge winter offensive that failed to capture significant territory.

Tanks and pilot training

After the US, Britain has been the second-largest supplier of military aid to Ukraine, contributing £2.3 billion (S$3.8 billion) worth of support in 2022.

Although this is well below what the US has provided, Britain has in the past been the first country to supply more sophisticated weapons to Ukraine.

Britain sent the first shoulder-launched anti-air and anti-tank weapons to Ukraine in the run-up to the invasion and in February announced it would be the first country to begin training Ukrainian pilots on Nato fighter jets.

In January, Britain said it would send 14 of its main Challenger 2 battle tanks to Ukraine, a pledge that was followed by other nations including the US and Germany.

Last week, a British-led group of European countries asked companies for expressions of interest to supply Ukraine with missiles with a range of up to 300km, but Britain said on Tuesday that no final decision had been taken on supplying the weapons.

Storm Shadow, manufactured by European missile maker MBDA, is an air-launched long-range missile, designed for attacks against high value targets such as hardened bunkers and key infrastructure, according to the company’s website.

They have a range of more than 250km, according to the manufacturer.

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak told the Munich Security Conference in February that Britain would be the first country to provide Ukraine with longer range weapons.

The US said in February it would provide the ground-launched small diameter bomb, which has a range of about 151km. REUTERS

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UK promises Ukraine more weapons, angering Russia

Zelenskyy secures pledges of further arms as Ukraine prepares to step up assaults against Russian occupiers.

AYLESBURY, ENGLAND - MAY 15: Britain's Prime Minister, Rishi Sunak, walks Ukraine's President, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, to a waiting Chinook helicopter after meetings at Chequers on May 15, 2023 in Aylesbury, England. In recent days, Mr Zelenskiy has travelled to meet Western leaders seeking support for Ukraine in the war against Russia. Carl Court/Pool via REUTERS

The United Kingdom has promised Ukraine further arms for its fight against Russia, as President Volodymyr Zelenskyy made a surprise stop to meet with his British counterpart.

Zelenskyy landed by helicopter on Monday at Chequers Court, the British leader’s official country retreat, where he was greeted by Prime Minister Rishi Sunak with a handshake and a hug.

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Sunak’s office said that Britain was set to confirm it was giving Ukraine hundreds more air defence missiles, as well as “long-range attack drones” with a range of more than 200km (124 miles).

Zelenskyy, on his second trip to the UK since Russia invaded his country in February 2022, thanked his staunch ally and said the war was a matter of “security not only for Ukraine, it is important for all of Europe.”

Sunak told Zelenskyy that “your leadership, your country’s bravery and fortitude are an inspiration to us all”.

In the past few days, Zelenskyy has visited France , Germany and Italy, seeking more aid as Ukraine prepares a long-anticipated spring offensive to retake territory seized by Russia.

The Kremlin said it took London’s promise to supply Ukraine with more weapons “extremely negatively”, but at the same time believed the supplies would not drastically change the course of the war.

“Britain aspires to be at the forefront among countries that continue to pump weapons into Ukraine,” Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said. “We repeat once again, it cannot yield any drastic and fundamental influence on the way the special military operation [in Ukraine] is unfolding. But, definitely, it leads to further destruction, further action … It makes this whole story for Ukraine much more complicated.”

The UK has become one of Ukraine’s major military allies, sending Kyiv short-range missiles and Challenger tanks and training 15,000 Ukrainian troops on British soil.

Last week, Britain announced it had sent Ukraine Storm Shadow cruise missiles, which have a range of more than 250km (155 miles) – the first known shipment of the weaponry that Kyiv has long sought from its allies.

Russia’s Defence Ministry said for the first time on Monday that it had downed a Storm Shadow missile supplied to Ukraine by Britain.

In its daily briefing on the conflict, the ministry said that it had shot down the cruise missile, as well as shorter-range US-built HIMARS-launched and HARM missiles.

Himars

Britain is the first country to publicly supply Kyiv with long-range cruise missiles, which could allow Ukrainian forces to hit Russian troops and supply depots far behind the front lines as it prepares a major counteroffensive.

Meanwhile, Zelenskyy said more work was needed to have allies build a “fighter jet coalition” to provide Ukraine with vital air defences.

While Sunak’s spokesman said no planes would be provided, the prime minister said the UK would be a key part of the coalition and would begin training Ukrainian fighter pilots as soon as this summer.

Sunak will also push allies to deliver more support to Ukraine at a meeting of Group of Seven leaders in Japan later this week, Downing Street said.

Earlier, the office of French President Emmanuel Macron said his country would supply dozens of light tanks, armoured vehicles and more air defence systems “in the weeks ahead”, without giving specific numbers.

About 2,000 Ukrainian soldiers would also receive training in France this year and nearly 4,000 others in Poland as part of a wider European effort, Macron’s office said.

France had dispatched a plane to pick up Zelenskyy in Germany, where he met with Chancellor Olaf Scholz earlier Sunday.

It was his first visit to Berlin since the start of the invasion and came a day after the German government announced a new package of military aid for Ukraine worth more than 2.7 billion euros ($3bn), including tanks, anti-aircraft systems and ammunition.

After initially hesitating to provide Ukraine with lethal weapons, Germany has become one of the biggest suppliers of arms to Ukraine, including Leopard 1 and 2 battle tanks, and the sophisticated IRIS-T SLM air defence system. Modern Western hardware is considered crucial if Ukraine is to succeed in its planned counteroffensive.

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Russian Missiles Hit Ukrainian Cities Amid Fears Over Air Defenses

The assault killed at least five people and wounded scores in Kyiv and Kharkiv. Ukraine is pushing for further American military aid, which has been stalled in Congress.

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Emergency workers stand along red and white police tape on the periphery of a damaged building.

By Maria Varenikova

Reporting from Kyiv, Ukraine

Russia launched a combination of cruise and ballistic missiles at Ukrainian cities on Tuesday in a large volley that killed at least 19 people and injured another 120, according to local authorities. The assault added to concerns about the state of Ukraine’s air defenses as Russian barrages continue on its largest cities.

Ukraine’s air force said that 41 missiles had entered the country’s airspace early Tuesday. The Ukrainian authorities provide details of cruise missiles in flight, and residents can track them for about an hour as they fly from Russia. The ballistic missiles, which travel much faster, struck in Kyiv on Tuesday just as the cruise missiles arrived.

Yuriy Ihnat, an air force spokesman, said in a telephone interview that the military had intercepted only about half of the total barrage, and just five of the 24 ballistic missiles. That was a lower success rate for Ukraine than achieved against earlier bombardments, because ballistic missiles, which are harder to intercept, made up a higher proportion of Tuesday’s volley, he said.

“Most of missiles were ballistic, and our air force can’t down them all,” Mr. Ihnat said.

In Kyiv, the capital, at least one missile appeared to detonate at ground level, residents said, although it was unclear whether it had evaded Ukraine’s air defenses or whether the warhead fell and blew up after the missile was destroyed in the air.

Concern has grown in Ukraine that air defense ammunition will run low as further military aid from the United States remains stalled in Congress . Mr. Ihnat said that the air force had not run out of ammunition in Tuesday’s assault, but that Ukraine did require a regular resupply.

He also said that not all of the missiles that evaded Ukraine’s defenses had hit their targets. “Many of them just fell in the fields, as Russian missiles’ quality has decreased,” he said.

Residents of the capital awoke to an air-raid alarm around 6 a.m., followed by explosions and the rattle of machine guns firing at the cruise missiles. Missiles or falling debris struck five neighborhoods in Kyiv, according to the city’s mayor, Vitali Klitschko. The police strung red tape around strike sites, and emergency workers cleared bricks and broken glass from the streets.

One explosion from either falling debris or a missile rang out in the government district in central Kyiv, near the presidential office and Parliament. It was the first damage from a missile attack in the district since October 2022.

In the city’s Sviatoshynsky district, an older man stood on the street, shaking and crying, after watching wounded children being evacuated from one strike site. “Their entire bodies were bandaged,” said the man, who declined to give his name. He struggled to say anything more.

Cars caught fire on a street in one district. Mr. Klitschko wrote on the Telegram social messaging app that a warhead from one intercepted missile had landed in a resident’s kitchen but did not explode.

In Kharkiv, Ukraine’s second largest city, missiles killed two people and wounded at least 38, the mayor, Ihor Terekhov, wrote on Telegram.

Missiles hit at least four locations in the city, whose center is just 25 miles from the Russian border — the first strikes around 4 a.m. and another salvo three hours later, the head of the regional military administration, Oleh Syniehubov, said in a brief interview at the site of one of the strikes.

Tetiana Derevianko, who lives in the city, said she had been asleep in her ninth-floor apartment when a powerful blast jolted her awake. Her husband, Stas, was in the kitchen and was thrown against the refrigerator, an impact that split his forehead open.

As blood streamed down his face, he called out to his wife.

“Stas shouted to get up to hide behind the second wall,” she said. “We lay on the floor and prayed.”

In those chaotic first moments, she thought their building had been hit. But they had been spared the worst: The missile struck a five-story apartment building next door, reducing it to a heap of twisted metal and concrete.

Ukraine’s military said its soldiers had shot down one cruise missile with a machine gun, a rare feat that could not be independently confirmed. Typically, fighter jets or ground-based antiaircraft missiles are needed to intercept cruise missiles.

As Russia pressed ahead with its assaults on Ukraine, NATO officials in Brussels announced on Tuesday that the military alliance had signed contracts worth $1.2 billion to buy 155-millimeter caliber artillery shells — one of the most-needed weapons on Ukraine’s battlefields.

The estimated 220,000 shells will not be delivered for at least two years, officials said, and will be sent to member states to refill stockpiles that have been depleted by military assistance to Ukraine. It will be up to NATO states to decide whether they can spare more for Kyiv.

“Russia’s war in Ukraine has become a battle for ammunition,” said Jens Stoltenberg, the NATO secretary general.

Officials did not say which ammunition producers — whether based in Europe, the United States or elsewhere — would manufacture the shells.

Across Ukraine on Tuesday morning, thousands of people took shelter with their children in basements or subway stations. After the explosions in Kyiv, some rushed out to check on their homes and businesses.

“We ran to try to save anything we could from our shop,” said Ina Halushko, 50, the owner of a grocery store about a hundred yards from one of the sites hit in Kyiv. Its windows were shattered, she said as she pointed toward the store, but the building did not catch fire.

In Kyiv, people who had gathered near a building that was damaged by falling missile debris said they worried about the diminishing supply of antiaircraft missiles protecting the city.

“If America stops supporting us, next time you won’t see me here,” said Olesya Dubinska, who lives in a nearby building. She was watching emergency crews clean up the site with her dog, a black Doberman named Lucky.

“We understand the forces are not equal,” she said. “Our territory is far smaller than Russia. Of course we need help.”

Andrew E. Kramer contributed reporting from Kyiv, Ukraine, Marc Santora and Liubov Sholudko from Kharkiv, and Lara Jakes from Rome.

Our Coverage of the War in Ukraine

News and Analysis

The fate of Ukraine’s top commander, Gen. Valery Zaluzhny, appears to be hanging by a thread  — not over his standing in the army, where he is well regarded, but over tensions with President Volodymyr Zelensky.

Russia and Ukraine exchanged hundreds of prisoners of war , resuming the carefully choreographed trading of captives only a week after Moscow accused Kyiv of shooting down a Russian military plane  that it said was carrying Ukrainian prisoners.

Ukraine’s government says it has cobbled together financing to last several months without long-stalled aid from the United States and Europe. But further delays would trigger an all-but-certain economic crisis , officials and analysts say.

Broadcasting Rage: Residents of the battered Ukrainian city of Kharkiv turn to a station called Radio Boiling Over to vent their anger at Russian attacks .

Reined In: Ukraine’s oligarchs have lost billions from the shelling of their factories. Now the government hopes to break their political influence .

Staying Put: The front line in Ukraine is largely populated by the elderly these days. Some can’t afford to get out, while others say they won’t leave their homes .

How We Verify Our Reporting

Our team of visual journalists analyzes satellite images, photographs , videos and radio transmissions  to independently confirm troop movements and other details.

We monitor and authenticate reports on social media, corroborating these with eyewitness accounts and interviews. Read more about our reporting efforts .

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Russian missiles strike Ukrainian cities again, killing at least 7 and wounding dozens

Russian missiles targeted Ukraine’s two biggest cities on Tuesday, damaging apartment buildings and killing at least seven people after Moscow shunned any deal to end the almost two-year war. (Jan. 23) (AP video: Vasilisa Stepanenko & Alex Babenko)

Rescuers work at the scene of a building damaged by Russian rocket attack in Kharkiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2024. (AP Photo/Andrii Marienko)

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Rescuers work the scene of a building damaged by Russian rocket attack in Kharkiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2024. (AP Photo/Andrii Marienko)

Rescuers work the scene of a building damaged by a Russian rocket attack in Kharkiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2024. (AP Photo/Andrii Marienko)

Rescuers evacuate a wounded man after a Russian attack in Kyiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2024. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

A woman shows her pets as she waits in the bus while sappers operate at the site of a Russian attack in Kyiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2024. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

Sappers load an unexploded missile warhead onto a truck at the site of Russian attack in Kyiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2024. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

In this photo provided by the Ukrainian Emergency Service, rescuers work the scene of a building damaged by Russian rocket attack in Kharkiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2024. (Ukrainian Emergency Service via AP Photo)

A general view at the site of the Russian rocket attack in Kharkiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2024. (AP Photo/Andrii Marienko)

People react at the site of a Russian attack in Kyiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2024. (AP Photo/Efrem Lukatsky)

In this photo provided by the Kyiv Regional Military Administration, debris of a destroyed apartment building is seen after a Russian attack in Kyiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2024. (Kyiv Regional Military Administration via AP)

A body covered by blanket lies on the ground after Russian rocket attack in Kharkiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2024. (AP Photo/Andrii Marienko)

A vendor collects surviving goods from her shop damaged by Russian rocket attack in Kharkiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2024. (AP Photo/Andrii Marienko)

In this photo provided by Kharkiv Regional Prosecutor’s Office, medical staff carry a local resident injured as a result of a Russian missile attack in Kharkiv, Ukraine, Tuesday, Jan. 23, 2024. (Kharkiv Regional Prosecutor’s Office/ via AP)

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Russian missiles struck three Ukrainian cities Tuesday, including its two biggest, killing at least seven people and wrecking apartment buildings after Moscow shunned any deal backed by Kyiv and its Western allies to end the nearly 2-year-old war .

The barrage included more than 40 ballistic, cruise, anti-aircraft and guided missiles, officials reported, in what the United Nations said appeared to be the heaviest bombardment since early January, when hundreds of Ukrainian civilians were killed. Ukraine’s air force, whose defenses include Western-supplied systems, said it intercepted 21 of the missiles.

The attacks keep Ukrainians on edge while the 1,500-kilometer (930-mile) front line has barely budged. Both sides’ inability to deliver major gains on the battlefield has pushed the fighting toward trench and artillery warfare. Analysts say Russia stockpiled missiles at the end of last year to press a winter campaign of aerial bombardment.

The recent Russian bombardment was “an alarming reversal” of a trend last year that saw a drop in civilian casualties from Kremlin attacks, the U.N. said.

Estonia's Prime Minister Kaja Kallas talks to journalists as he arrives for an EU summit in Brussels, Thursday, Feb. 1, 2024. European Union leaders meet in Brussels for a one day summit to discuss the revision of the Multiannual Financial Framework 2021-2027, including support for Ukraine. (AP Photo/Omar Havana)

AP AUDIO: Russian missiles strike Ukrainian cities again.

AP correspondent Charles de Ledesma reports on missiles targeting Kyiv and Kharkiv.

More than 10,000 civilians have been killed and nearly 20,000 injured since Russia’s full-scale invasion in February 2022, the U.N. said.

Tuesday’s onslaught in Kharkiv , in northeastern Ukraine, killed six people and injured 57, including eight children, the U.N. said. The missiles damaged about 30 residential buildings and shattered hundreds of windows in icy weather, regional Gov. Oleh Syniehubov said.

Russia used S-300, Kh-32 and hypersonic Iskander missiles in the attack, he said.

A five-story apartment building appeared to have been directly hit by several missiles around dawn, the U.N. Human Rights Mission in Ukraine said in a statement.

An unknown number of people were trapped in the rubble with the temperature falling to minus 7 degrees Celsius (19 degrees Fahrenheit), said Kharkiv Mayor Ihor Terekhov.

Kharkiv, about 30 kilometers (18 miles) from the border, has often felt the brunt of Russia’s winter campaign of long-range strikes that commonly hit civilian areas.

Four districts of Kyiv came under an attack that injured at least 20 people, including a 13-year-old boy, according to Mayor Vitalii Klitschko. Officials corrected initial reports that a civilian had been killed in the capital, saying the wounded person was hospitalized on life support.

U.N. staff visited a Kyiv neighborhood with a damaged residential building, a school, a sports center and a kindergarten.

A missile also killed a 43-year-old woman and damaged two schools and eight high-rise buildings in Pavlohrad, an industrial city in the eastern Dnipro region, the country’s presidential office said.

In Balakliia, in the Kharkiv region, an 88-year-old man and a 78-year-old woman were rescued from the rubble of a house after Russian shelling, it said.

In the south, Russia attacked the city of Beryslav with drones, killing a 69-year-old man on a motorcycle.

There appeared to be scant chance of an end to the war anytime soon. Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov defied the United States and other Ukraine supporters at a U.N. meeting on Monday, ruling out any peace plan they support.

Lavrov claimed that Ukrainian forces have been “a complete failure” on the battlefield and are “incapable” of defeating Russia.

On Sunday, Moscow-installed officials in eastern Ukraine claimed that shelling by Kyiv killed 27 people on the outskirts of Russian-occupied Donetsk .

The Ukrainian military, however, denied it had anything to do with the attack.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Tuesday’s attacks should not be seen as Moscow’s response to the Donetsk strike. He repeated Moscow’s claim that its forces don’t strike civilian areas, although there is substantial evidence to the contrary .

Deaths of Ukrainian civilians have stirred international outrage over Russia’s invasion, and Ukrainian officials have pointed to the attacks in their efforts to secure further military aid from the country’s allies.

NATO on Tuesday signed a $1.2-billion contract to make tens of thousands of artillery rounds to replenish the dwindling stocks of its member countries. The contract will allow allies to backfill their arsenals and provide Ukraine with more ammunition.

Turkish legislators lifted a major hurdle to Sweden’s membership in NATO on Tuesday by endorsing its entry into the military alliance. Sweden and Finland abandoned their traditional positions of military nonalignment to seek protection under NATO’s umbrella after Russia’s invasion of Ukraine in February 2022.

In a virtual meeting Tuesday with Ukrainian Prime Minister Denys Shmyhal, U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen reiterated the Biden administration’s ongoing efforts to secure $11.8 billion for Ukraine, according to a Treasury Department readout of the meeting. The money would be part of a national security supplemental request before Congress.

Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk on Monday was the latest foreign leader to visit Ukraine and announce a new aid package that includes a loan to buy larger weapons and a commitment to find ways to manufacture them together.

Ukraine’s allies have recently sought to reassure the country that they are committed to its long-term defense amid concerns that Western support could be flagging. British Prime Minister Rishi Sunak and France’s new foreign minister also traveled to Kyiv in the new year.

But the United States, Ukraine’s main supplier, is currently unable to send Ukraine any ammunition or weapons. While waiting for Congress to approve more money for Ukraine’s fight, the U.S. is looking to its allies to bridge the gap.

Associated Press Writer Yuras Karmanau in Tallinn, Estonia, contributed to this report.

Follow AP’s coverage of the war in Ukraine at https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine

british cruise missiles for ukraine

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  1. What weapons are being given to Ukraine by the UK?

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  2. EXCLUSIVA CNN: Reino Unido entregó misiles de crucero de largo alcance

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  3. UK confirms supply of Storm Shadow long-range missiles in Ukraine

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  4. UK delivers long-range Storm Shadow missiles to Ukraine

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  5. Britain to provide long-range Storm Shadow cruise missiles to Ukraine

    british cruise missiles for ukraine

  6. UK Orders Production of MBDA’s SPEAR Mini-Cruise Missile

    british cruise missiles for ukraine

COMMENTS

  1. UK confirms supply of Storm Shadow long-range missiles in Ukraine

    11th May 2023, 05:54 PDT By James Gregory BBC News Gary Dawson/Shutterstock The UK has confirmed it is supplying Ukraine with long-range missiles it requested for its fight against invading...

  2. Britain has delivered long-range 'Storm Shadow' cruise missiles to

    The United Kingdom has delivered multiple "Storm Shadow" cruise missiles to Ukraine, giving the nation a new long-range strike capability in advance of a highly anticipated counteroffensive...

  3. Britain moves first to supply Ukraine with long-range cruise missiles

    LONDON, May 11 (Reuters) - Britain on Thursday became the first country to start supplying Ukraine with long-range cruise missiles, which will allow Ukrainian forces to hit Russian troops...

  4. U.K. Gives Ukraine the Storm Shadow: Long-Range Missile Details

    The U.K. has transferred Storm Shadow air-launched cruise missiles to Ukraine in response to Russia's sustained air attacks on civilian targets in Ukraine. ... British defense secretary Ben ...

  5. UK confirms supply of Storm Shadow long-range missiles in Ukraine

    The UK has confirmed it is supplying Ukraine with long-range missiles it requested for its fight against invading Russian forces. The Storm Shadow cruise missile has a range of over 250km (155 ...

  6. UK delivers cruise missiles to Ukraine ahead of counter-offensive

    Britain has delivered multiple Storm Shadow cruise missiles to Ukraine, UK defence secretary Ben Wallace has announced, boosting Kyiv's defensive capability as it prepares to launch a...

  7. UK sending long-range Storm Shadow missiles to Ukraine, says defence

    Britain has become the first western country to provide Ukraine with the long-range Storm Shadow cruise missiles that Kyiv wants to boost its chances in a much-anticipated counteroffensive ...

  8. What weapons are being given to Ukraine by the UK?

    The UK is the first country to supply cruise missiles to Kyiv. Tanks The UK also led the way in supplying Nato standard main battle tanks to Ukraine. In January the UK announced that 14...

  9. Ukraine gets British long-range missiles ahead of counteroffensive

    It's part of a wider Western effort to strengthen Ukraine's deep-strike capabilities which has recently seen a British-led effort to procure missiles or rockets with a range of 100-300km and ...

  10. UK sends cruise missiles to Ukraine as Kyiv prepares for ...

    KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — The British government said Thursday that it sent long-range cruise missiles to Ukraine to help drive out Russia's occupying forces, an announcement made as Kyiv said...

  11. U.K. giving Ukraine long-range cruise missiles ahead of

    World U.K. giving Ukraine long-range cruise missiles ahead of counteroffensive against Russia's invasion May 11, 2023 / 10:14 AM EDT / CBS/AP Kyiv, Ukraine — The British government...

  12. Britain prepares to send long-range missiles to Ukraine

    In a procurement notice posted May 2 by the British-led International Fund for Ukraine, a group of northern European countries that has set up a mechanism to send weapons to the battlefield, the ...

  13. British-led coalition hopes to supply longer-range missiles to Ukraine

    Tue 9 May 2023 13.31 EDT Britain and a group of European allies are hoping to supply long-distance cruise missiles to Ukraine, similar in range to those the US has so far refused to supply...

  14. British cruise missiles were used in significant Ukrainian attack on

    Ukraine used British cruise missiles in a significant attack against the headquarters of Russia's Black Sea Fleet in occupied Crimea, Sky News understands. A Russian submarine and warship were damaged in the pre-dawn barrage on the Sevastopol shipyard - potentially the largest strike against Russian naval targets of the war.

  15. Storm Shadow

    The Storm Shadow is a Franco - British low-observable, long-range air-launched cruise missile developed since 1994 by Matra and British Aerospace, and now manufactured by MBDA. [6] "

  16. UK suggests cruise missile swap with Germany to arm Ukraine

    The United Kingdom has proposed a weapon exchange to address Germany's concerns over long-range missile delivery to Ukraine. According to sources cited by Handelsblatt, London is seeking Taurus cruise missiles from Berlin, in exchange for supplying additional SCALP-EG/Storm Shadow cruise missiles to Ukraine. The proposal aims to provide ...

  17. Ukraine Armed Both Of Its Bomber Types With British Cruise Missiles

    Via social media. The Ukrainian air force has armed its Sukhoi Su-24M bombers with British-made Storm Shadow cruise missiles. A photo that appeared online on Friday depicts one of the swing-wing ...

  18. Storm Shadow missiles in devastating strikes far behind Russian lines

    British Storm Shadow cruise missiles have been fired for the first time by Ukrainian forces, hitting a Russian supply depot and a military command centre 80 miles behind the front line. The ...

  19. Ukraine says bomber deployed British and French cruise missiles

    Ukraine has confirmed that British and French cruise missiles - fired from either wing of a Ukrainian bomber - were used in a major attack against Russia's navy in occupied Crimea and worked "perfectly".

  20. UK offers cruise-missile swap to Germany to aid Ukraine -Handelsblatt

    The paper cited government and diplomatic sources as saying that the British government had suggested to Berlin several weeks ago that it could export Storm Shadow cruise missiles to Ukraine and ...

  21. Russia threatens 'military response' after UK gives long-range missiles

    The deployment of the Storm Shadow cruise missiles mark a significant step-up in the capabilities of arms the UK has sent to Ukraine. The missile has a strike capability of nearly 200 miles (300km ...

  22. Ukraine says it wrecked Russian submarine with British cruise missiles

    Voiced by artificial intelligence. KYIV — Ukraine on Thursday confirmed it wrecked a Russian submarine with British weapons, during a missile attack on the Black Sea port of Sevastopol in Russian-occupied Crimea. The Russian cruise missile carrier — the Rostov-on-Don — was significantly damaged in the massive Ukrainian strike, as was ...

  23. Germany Eyes Plan With UK, France on Missiles for Ukraine

    January 25, 2024 at 7:04 AM PST. Listen. 2:59. Germany is examining a potential swap deal under which it would supply long-range cruise missiles to the UK and France so they can arm Ukraine with ...

  24. Britain is supplying Ukraine with long-range cruise missiles

    Last week, a British-led group of European countries asked companies for expressions of interest to supply Ukraine with missiles with a range of up to 300km, but Britain said on Tuesday that no ...

  25. Ukraine launches massive Storm Shadow missile attack on Crimea

    A British Storm Shadow missile was likely used by Kyiv in the Crimea assault Credit: REUTERS/HO/Cpl Mark Bailey Ukraine launched a massive missile barrage against four Russian military positions ...

  26. UK promises Ukraine more weapons, angering Russia

    Last week, Britain announced it had sent Ukraine Storm Shadow cruise missiles, which have a range of more than 250km (155 miles) - the first known shipment of the weaponry that Kyiv has long ...

  27. Russian Missiles Hit Ukrainian Cities Amid Fears Over Air Defenses

    Jan. 23, 2024. Russia launched a combination of cruise and ballistic missiles at Ukrainian cities on Tuesday in a large volley that killed at least 19 people and injured another 120, according to ...

  28. Russian missiles strike Ukrainian cities, killing at least 7

    KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — Russian missiles struck three Ukrainian cities Tuesday, including its two biggest, killing at least seven people and wrecking apartment buildings after Moscow shunned any deal backed by Kyiv and its Western allies to end the nearly 2-year-old war.. The barrage included more than 40 ballistic, cruise, anti-aircraft and guided missiles, officials reported, in what the ...